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1.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 845, 2021 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638197

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has recently become the most important issue in the world. Very few reports in Japan have examined the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on peripartum mental health. We examined the status of postpartum mental health before and during COVID-19 pandemic from a consecutive database in a metropolitan area of Japan. METHODS: The subjects were women who had completed a maternity health check-up at a core regional hospital in Yokohama during the period from April 1, 2017, to December 31, 2020. We collected the subjects' scores for the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the Mother-to-Infant Bonding Scale (MIBS) at 1 month postpartum. The subjects were divided into four groups (three Before COVID-19 groups and a During COVID-19 group). MANOVA and post-hoc tests were used to determine mental health changes in the postpartum period among the four groups. RESULTS: The Before and During COVID-19 groups contained 2844 and 1095 mothers, respectively. There were no significant difference in the total scores of the EPDS and MIBS among the four groups. However, the EPDS items related to anxiety factors were significantly higher and the EPDS items related to anhedonia and depression factors (excluding thoughts of self-harm) were significantly lower in the During COVID-19 group. CONCLUSION: The EPDS scores changed in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic. Anxiety, which represent hypervigilance, was significantly higher and anhedonia and depression were significantly lower in the During COVID-19 group. Our results may reflect COVID-19-related health concerns and a lack of social support caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Mothers/psychology , Postpartum Period/psychology , Adult , Anhedonia , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Retrospective Studies
2.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 33, 2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637845

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 vaccines are advised for pregnant women in the United Kingdom (UK) however COVID-19 vaccine uptake among pregnant women is inadequate. METHODS: An online survey and semi-structured interviews were used to investigate pregnant women's views on COVID-19 vaccine acceptability for themselves when pregnant, not pregnant and for their babies. One thousand one hundred eighty-one women, aged over 16 years, who had been pregnant since 23rd March 2020, were surveyed between 3rd August-11th October 2020. Ten women were interviewed. RESULTS: The majority of women surveyed (81.2%) reported that they would 'definitely' or were 'leaning towards' accepting a COVID-19 vaccine when not pregnant. COVID-19 vaccine acceptance was significantly lower during pregnancy (62.1%, p < 0.005) and for their babies (69.9%, p < 0.005). Ethnic minority women were twice as likely to reject a COVID-19 vaccine for themselves when not pregnant, pregnant and for their babies compared to women from White ethnic groups (p < 0.005). Women from lower-income households, aged under 25-years, and from some geographic regions were more likely to reject a COVID-19 vaccine when not pregnant, pregnant and for their babies. Multivariate analysis revealed that income and ethnicity were the main drivers of the observed age and regional differences. Women unvaccinated against pertussis in pregnancy were over four times more likely to reject COVID-19 vaccines when not pregnant, pregnant and for their babies. Thematic analysis of the survey freetext responses and interviews found safety concerns about COVID-19 vaccines were common though wider mistrust in vaccines was also expressed. Trust in vaccines and the health system were also reasons women gave for accepting COVID-19 vaccines. CONCLUSION: Safety information on COVID-19 vaccines must be clearly communicated to pregnant women to provide reassurance and facilitate informed pregnancy vaccine decisions. Targeted interventions to promote COVID-19 vaccine uptake among ethnic minority and lower-income women may be needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , /statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Income , Mothers/psychology , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
4.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 176, 2021 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561998

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a group of persistent psychological and physiological symptoms due to a traumatic, severe, event. Only few studies focused on the effects of Covid-19 on psychosocial outcomes in children with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) and their parents. AIM OF THE STUDY: The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence PTSD in parents of children with T1D during COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the period between March and May 2020 we submitted the "Impact of Event Scale - Revised" (IES-R) questionnaire to the parents of 34 children with Type 1 Diabetes, asking them to express their emotions about the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic. RESULTS: A total of thirty mothers (mean age 43.0 ± 4.2 years) and 25 fathers (mean age 45.6 ± 5.9 years) participated in the survey and completed the questionnaires. 29.1% of parents had a score that allows to define a clinically relevant level of PTSD; ten mothers and 6 fathers had a PTSD clinically relevant score, corresponding, respectively, to 28.4 and 24% of total mothers and fathers. Finally, mothers and fathers, both express PTSD symptoms mainly in the form of intrusion and hyperarousal. CONCLUSIONS: The present study confirms a high prevalence symptoms related to PTSD in mothers and fathers of children with Type 1 Diabetes. We believe that psychosocial outcomes of the COVID-19 pandemic should be taken into account in the planning of the next future assistance for children with T1D.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/psychology , Fathers/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Symptom Assessment
5.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 82(4)2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518675

ABSTRACT

Objective: The conditions created by the COVID-19 pandemic could negatively affect maternal mental health and the mother-infant relationship. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on depression, anxiety, and mother-infant bonding among women seeking treatment for postpartum depression (PPD).Methods: Baseline data collected in two separate randomized controlled trials of a psychoeducational intervention for PPD in the same geographic region, one prior to COVID-19 (March 2019-March 2020) and one during the COVID-19 pandemic (April-October 2020), were compared. Eligible participants had an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of ≥ 10, were ≥ 18 years of age, had an infant < 12 months old, and were fluent in English. Outcomes included PPD (EPDS), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 [GAD-7]), and mother-infant relationship (Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire [PBQ]). All were measured continuously and dichotomized at accepted clinical cutoffs.Results: Of the 603 participants (305 pre-COVID-19; 298 during COVID-19), mothers enrolled during the COVID-19 pandemic reported higher levels of symptoms of PPD (B = 1.35; 95% CI, 0.64 to 2.06; Cohen d = 0.31) and anxiety (B = 1.52; 95% CI, 0.72 to 2.32; Cohen d = 0.30). During COVID-19, women had 65% higher odds of clinically significant levels of depression symptoms (OR = 1.65; 95% CI, 1.13 to 2.31) and 46% higher odds of clinically relevant anxiety symptoms (OR = 1.46; 95% CI, 1.05 to 2.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences in mother-infant bonding.Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that rates and severity of PPD and anxiety symptoms among women seeking treatment for PPD have worsened in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, treatment-seeking mothers have consistently maintained good relationships with their infants. Considering the difficulties women with PPD face when accessing treatment, it is important that strategies are developed and disseminated to safely identify and manage PPD to mitigate potential long-term adverse consequences for mothers and their families.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT03654261 and NCT04485000.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/etiology , Mother-Child Relations/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Object Attachment , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Ontario/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Self Report , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
7.
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs ; 46(6): 362, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494111
8.
Women Birth ; 34(2): 128-135, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454573

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Limited literature is available about women who wish to breastfeed but experience unexpected feelings of aversion in reaction to their infant suckling at the breast while breastfeeding. BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding benefits mothers, infants and society yet breastfeeding rates continue to fall below recommendations in part due to inadequate tailored support after hospital discharge. Influences on breastfeeding are complex and include many physiological, psychosocial and cultural factors. AIM: To better understand the experience of women who have feelings of aversion during breastfeeding by synthesising the existing literature. METHODS: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Maternity and Infant Care databases were searched for relevant literature published between 2000 to 2019. Using Covidence software, five qualitative research studies were identified. Studies were then analysed using meta-ethnographic qualitative synthesis. FINDINGS: Feelings of aversion during breastfeeding were described as visceral and overwhelming; leading to feelings of shame and inadequacy. This synthesis identified five findings; a central conceptual category of "it's such a strong feeling of get away from me" with four key metaphors translated from this central conceptual category: "I do it because I feel it is best for my baby", "I can't control those feelings", "I should be able to breastfeed my son and enjoy it", and "I'm glad I did it". This phenomenon may negatively affect a women's sense of self and impact on the mother-infant relationship. CONCLUSION: Some women who want to breastfeed can experience feelings of aversion while breastfeeding. The feelings of 'aversion' while breastfeeding can inhibit women from achieving their personal breastfeeding goals.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , Maternal Behavior/ethnology , Mothers/psychology , Adult , Affect , Anthropology, Cultural , Breast Feeding/ethnology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interviews as Topic , Maternal Behavior/psychology , Mother-Child Relations , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , Self Concept
9.
Matern Child Health J ; 25(6): 870-880, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453810

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Perinatal mood and anxiety disorders can have far reaching negative impact on both maternal mental health and child growth and development. Multimodal group parenting programs have been shown to improve maternal mental health symptoms however, they are often costly to provide and not accessible to many mothers, especially those mothers suffering from mental health symptoms. Therefore, the authors sought to answer the following question by undertaking a systematic review of the literature: are parenting interventions aimed at improving maternal-child interaction also a way to address mental health symptoms (i.e. depression, anxiety, stress) in mothers? METHODS: The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed. An online platform that supports the systematic review process and quality assessment according to Cochrane guidelines, Covidence, was used in conjunction with an adapted extraction tool to identify relevant studies and extract data for analysis. RESULTS: 11 articles were included in the qualitative synthesis. There was great heterogeneity between study interventions and measurement of outcomes for maternal mental health symptoms which precluded meta-analysis. CONCLUSION: Studies reviewed did not demonstrate consistent evidence to recommend that parenting interventions leads to improvement in maternal mental health symptoms for depression, anxiety or stress. However, there was evidence that participating in parenting programs does not worsen these symptoms and some encouraging evidence that alternative delivery methods, beyond face to face, could, with more research, lead to more financially feasible and sustainable models of delivery of these types of interventions in the future.


Subject(s)
Mental Health , Mothers , Parenting , Anxiety , Female , Humans , Mother-Child Relations , Mothers/psychology
10.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257590, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430543

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Vaccine hesitancy is identified as one of the top threats to global health. A significant drop of childhood vaccine coverage is reported worldwide. One of the key reasons that influenced mothers' choice to postpone, or avoid children's vaccination, is knowledge. This study aimed to assess the level of Cypriot mothers' knowledge on certain aspects of vaccination of their children, examine the association between vaccination knowledge and selected socio-demographic factors, and lastly assess the association of mothers' knowledge about vaccination with vaccination coverage and delay, compliance to the recommended schedules, vaccination during pregnancy and mother-pediatrician relationship. METHODS: An online-based cross-sectional study conducted to collect information about socio-demographic characteristics, child's characteristics, vaccination, and vaccine knowledge, using a self-administered questionnaire. The survey was conducted between April 2020 and June 2020 and the study population included mothers over 18 years old with at least one child (<18 years old) living in Cyprus. RESULTS: A total of 703 Cypriot mothers participated in the study. Most of the participants stated that they vaccined their children (97%) and the most popular source of information about vaccination was their pediatrician (90%). More than half of the participants (57%) have delayed their child/children vaccination with their pediatrician's suggestion being the main reason. 36% of mothers had low knowledge while the overall correct rate was 13.6% and the median (IQR) knowledge score was 11 (9-12). Having a medium knowledge about vaccination was associated with having a medium or high income, whilst high knowledge compared to low knowledge was associated with completed a higher education and having a high income. Our analysis showed that the correct knowledge by mothers with regards to vaccination increases the probability of vaccinating their children, following the local recommendations for vaccine dosages, and acquiring and trusting vaccination-related information from their children's pediatrician. CONCLUSION: Our findings show that the majority of mothers in Cyprus had positives perceptions regarding childhood vaccination, as reflected with the high vaccination rate, however, some aspects of mothers' knowledge of vaccination need to be improved. Public health strategies to promote vaccination, education programs as well as improved communication tools between pediatricians and mothers need to be considered to achieve favorable vaccination attitudes and practices for all mothers in Cyprus.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Mothers/psychology , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cyprus , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Odds Ratio , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
11.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 625, 2021 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412672

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has placed additional stressors on mothers during an already vulnerable lifecourse transition. Initial social distancing restrictions (Timepoint 1; T1) and initial changes to those social distancing restrictions (Timepoint 2; T2) have disrupted postpartum access to practical and emotional support. This qualitative study explores the postpartum psychological experiences of UK women during different phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated 'lockdowns'. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 women, approximately 30 days after initial social distancing guidelines were imposed in the UK (22 April 2020). A separate 12 women were interviewed approximately 30 days after the initial easing of social distancing restrictions (10 June 2020). Data were transcribed verbatim, uploaded into NVivo for management and analysis, which followed a recurrent cross-sectional approach to thematic analysis. RESULTS: Two main themes were identified for T1: 'Motherhood is Much Like Lockdown' and 'A Self-Contained Family Unit'. Each main T1 theme contained two sub-themes. Two main themes were also identified for T2: 'Incongruously Held Views of COVID-19' and 'Mothering Amidst the Pandemic'. Each main T2 theme contained three sub-themes. Comparisons between data gathered at each timepoint identified increased emotional distress over time. Current findings call for the improvement of postpartum care by improving accessibility to social support, and prioritising the re-opening of schools, and face-to-face healthcare appointments and visitation. CONCLUSION: Social distancing restrictions associated with COVID-19 have had a cumulative, negative effect on postpartum mental health. Recommendations such as: Allowing mothers to 'bubble' with a primary support provider even at their healthcare appointments; allowing one support partner to attend all necessary healthcare appointments; and providing tailored informational resources, may help to support postpartum emotional wellbeing during this, and similar health crises in the future.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Psychological Distress , Social Support , Adult , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Mental Health Services , Postnatal Care/methods , Postpartum Period/psychology , Qualitative Research
12.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2124273, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409779

ABSTRACT

Importance: Early evidence shows a decrease in the number of US births during the COVID-19 pandemic, yet few studies have examined individual-level factors associated with pregnancy intention changes, especially among diverse study populations or in areas highly affected by COVID-19 in the US. Objective: To study changes in pregnancy intention following the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic and identify factors possibly associated with these changes. Design, Setting, and Participants: A cross-sectional, population-based study was conducted among women who were currently pregnant or had delivered a live infant and responded to a survey emailed to 2603 women (n = 1560). Women who were mothers of young children enrolled in the prospective New York University Children's Health and Environment Study birth cohort were included; women who were not currently pregnant or recently postpartum were excluded. Exposures: Demographic, COVID-19-related, stress-related, and financial/occupational factors were assessed via a survey administered from April 20 to August 31, 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Pregnancy intentions before the COVID-19 pandemic and change in pregnancy intentions following the outbreak. Results: Of the 2603 women who were sent the survey, 1560 (59.9%) who were currently pregnant or had delivered a live infant responded, and 1179 women (75.6%) answered the pregnancy intention questions. Mean (SD) age was 32.2 (5.6) years. Following the outbreak, 30 of 61 (49.2%) women who had been actively trying to become pregnant had ceased trying, 71 of 191 (37.2%) women who had been planning to become pregnant were no longer planning, and 42 of 927 (4.5%) women who were neither planning nor trying were newly considering pregnancy. Among those who ceased trying, fewer than half (13 [43.3%]) thought they would resume after the pandemic. Of those pre-COVID-19 planners/triers who stopped considering or attempting pregnancy, a greater proportion had lower educational levels, although the difference was not statistically significant on multivariable analysis (odds ratio [OR], 2.14; 95% CI, 0.92-4.96). The same was true for those with higher stress levels (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.99-1.20) and those with greater financial insecurity (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.97-1.92. Those who stopped considering or attempting pregnancy were more likely to respond to the questionnaire during the peak of the outbreak (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.01-4.11). Of those pre-COVID-19 nonplanners/nontriers who reported newly thinking about becoming pregnant, a smaller proportion responded during the peak, although the finding was not statistically significant on multivariable analysis (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.26-1.03). Likewise, fewer respondents who were financially insecure reported newly considering pregnancy, although the finding was not statistically significant (OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.46-1.03). They were significantly less likely to be of Hispanic ethnicity (OR, 0.27; 955 CI, 0.10-0.71) and more likely to have fewer children in the home (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40-0.98) or self-report a COVID-19 diagnosis (OR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.31-5.55). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cross-sectional study of 1179 women who were mothers of young children in New York City, increased stress and financial insecurity owing to the COVID-19 pandemic paralleled a reduction in pregnancy intention in the early months of the pandemic, potentially exacerbating long-term decreases in the fertility rate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Intention , Mothers/psychology , Pregnancy/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mothers/statistics & numerical data , New York City , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Medwave ; 21(7): e8454, 2021 Aug 30.
Article in Spanish, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406848

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 disease can affect women at any stage of pregnancy, and newborns could become infected with SARS-CoV-2 through vertical or horizontal transmission. Objective: To determine clinical and epidemiological characteristics of mothers with COVID-19, associated neonatal outcomes, and to evaluate SARS-CoV-2 vertical transmission. Methods: We conducted an observational, descriptive, cross-sectional study. We included all mothers with positive serology for SARS-CoV-2 and their newborns at the Hospital Regional Docente de Trujillo from April 18 to September 30, 2020. Variables were collected from the medical records, and descriptive statistics were used for the analysis. Results: A total of 647 mothers and 656 neonates were enrolled. Of all live births, 85.3% and 14.7% were term and preterm neonates, respectively. We found 1.7% (11/656) of newborns with positive RT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2; and that 27.3% (3/11) of these neonates required hospitalization. Neonatal mortality was 4/656 (0.6%), and no case was attributed to COVID-19. Of all mothers affected with COVID-19, 95.7% were asymptomatic, and 4.3% presented clinical symptoms attributed to COVID-19, most of which were mild. The most frequent obstetric complications were preeclampsia-eclampsia, prelabour rupture of membranes, and acute fetal distress. All the mothers were discharged. Conclusion: We found 1.7% of newborns with positive RT-PCR test for SARS-CoV-2; and that 20.1% of these neonates were hospitalized. The most frequent morbidity was neonatal sepsis and prematurity. The infection was mild among newborns, showing a 0.6% overall mortality, with no cases attributed to COVID-19. We found that only 5% of mothers presented symptoms, most of which were mild to moderate symptoms. There was no record of maternal mortality in this study group. It is not possible to conclude whether vertical transmission or intrapartum-acquired infection is responsible for neonatal COVID-19 infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Mothers/psychology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
14.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257357, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405343

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Australia has maintained low rates of SARS-COV-2 (COVID-19) infection, due to geographic location and strict public health restrictions. However, the financial and social impacts of these restrictions can negatively affect parents' and children's mental health. In an existing cohort of mothers recruited for their experience of adversity, this study examined: 1) families' experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic and public health restrictions in terms of clinical exposure, financial hardship family stress, and family resilience (termed 'COVID-19 impacts'); and 2) associations between COVID-19 impacts and maternal and child mental health. METHODS: Participants were mothers recruited during pregnancy (2013-14) across two Australian states (Victoria and Tasmania) for the 'right@home' trial. A COVID-19 survey was conducted from May-December 2020, when children were 5.9-7.2 years old. Mothers reported COVID-19 impacts, their own mental health (Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales short-form) and their child's mental health (CoRonavIruS Health and Impact Survey subscale). Associations between COVID-19 impacts and mental health were examined using regression models controlling for pre-COVID-19 characteristics. RESULTS: 319/406 (79%) mothers completed the COVID-19 survey. Only one reported having had COVID-19. Rates of self-quarantine (20%), job or income loss (27%) and family stress (e.g., difficulty managing children's at-home learning (40%)) were high. Many mothers also reported family resilience (e.g., family found good ways of coping (49%)). COVID-19 impacts associated with poorer mental health (standardised coefficients) included self-quarantine (mother: ß = 0.46, child: ß = 0.46), financial hardship (mother: ß = 0.27, child: ß = 0.37) and family stress (mother: ß = 0.49, child: ß = 0.74). Family resilience was associated with better mental health (mother: ß = -0.40, child: ß = -0.46). CONCLUSIONS: The financial and social impacts of Australia's public health restrictions have substantially affected families experiencing adversity, and their mental health. These impacts are likely to exacerbate inequities arising from adversity. To recover from COVID-19, policy investment should include income support and universal access to family health services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Mothers/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cost of Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Psychology, Child , Quarantine/economics , Resilience, Psychological
16.
17.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256597, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372014

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study objectives were to investigate maternal psychological distress, mothers' fear of their children contracting COVID-19, mothers' perceptions of the information available regarding children and COVID-19, changes in children's behavior during lockdown, and concerns of pregnant women in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: This cross-sectional study surveyed women aged 18 years and older who either had children under 10 years of age or were pregnant at the time of the survey. The outcomes included psychological distress, mothers' fear of their children contracting COVID-19, change in children's behaviors during COVID-19 lockdown and pregnant women's concerns. Multivariable ordinary least squares regression models were employed to examine the adjusted associations between sociodemographic factors and psychological distress, as well as fear of COVID-19. RESULTS: Of 628 women, 11.8% (n = 74) were pregnant at the time of survey. Most of the pregnant women (89.2%, n = 66) had some degree of concerns about their unborn babies getting infected during delivery in the hospital. Among mothers of children under 10 years of age (n = 564), half (n = 282) reported change in their children's behavior during the lockdown. Most mothers and pregnant women (94.9%, n = 569) had some degree of psychological distress. Mothers and pregnant women with a college degree had significantly lower psychological distress (ß = -1.346; p = 0.014) than women with a high school education or less. Similarly, mothers and pregnant women with monthly family income ≥ US$ 1,333 had lower psychological distress than those with < US$ 1,333. Women with pre-existing chronic physical (ß = 2.424; p < 0.001) or mental (ß = 4.733; p < 0.001) conditions had higher psychological distress than those without these conditions. Having children in the house was a contributory factor for higher psychological distress. For example, mothers with one child (ß = 2.602; p = 0.007) had significantly higher psychological distress compared to expectant mothers without children in the house. CONCLUSIONS: Most mothers and expectant mothers in our study had moderate to high levels of psychological distress during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak in Saudi Arabia. Education, family income and chronic mental and physical conditions were associated with high psychological distress in Saudi Arabia during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Fear , Mothers/psychology , Pregnant Women/psychology , Psychological Distress , Adolescent , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Young Adult
18.
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs ; 46(5): 284-292, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360376

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted health care delivery and services around the world causing rapid changes to maternity care protocols and pregnant women to give birth with tight restrictions and significant uncertainties. There is a gap in evidence about expectant and new mothers' experiences with birthing during the pandemic. We sought to describe and understand pregnant and new mothers' lived experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic using authentic birth stories. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Using a narrative analysis framework, we extracted relevant YouTube birth stories using predetermined search terms and inclusion criteria. Mothers' birth stories were narrated in their second or third trimester or those who had recently given birth during the pandemic. Birth stories were analyzed using an inductive and deductive approach to capture different and salient aspects of the birthing experience. RESULTS: N = 83 birth stories were analyzed. Within these birth stories, four broad themes and 13 subthemes were identified. Key themes included a sense of loss, hospital experiences, experiences with health care providers, and unique experiences during birth and postpartum. The birth stories revealed that the COVID-19 pandemic brought unexpected circumstances, both positive and negative, that had an impact on mothers' overall birthing experience. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Results provided a detailed description of women's lived experience with giving birth during the COVID-19 pandemic. Maternity nurses should try to provide clear communication and compassionate patient-centered care to relieve women's anxieties about uncertain and unpredictable policy changes on COVID-19 as the pandemic continues to evolve.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Maternal Health Services , Mothers/psychology , Parturition/psychology , Physical Distancing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; 20(10): 1339-1349, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352053

ABSTRACT

Vaccine hesitancy seriously hinders herd immunity. We explored the determinants of parental hesitancy to vaccinate children against Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China.A population-based self-administered online questionnaire evaluating parental hesitancy in vaccinating their children against COVID-19 was conducted in Taizhou, China. Of the 2463 parents who received the invitation, 1788 (72.6%) responded to the survey.Of the repondents, 52.5% were hesitant. Mothers exhibited a greater proportion of vaccine hesitancy than fathers did (57.5% vs. 41.7%, P < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that parents with children under 18 years of age (OR = 0.94, 95%CI: 0.90-0.99), lower knowledge scores about COVID-19 vaccination (Q1: OR = 1.92, 95%CI: 1.37-2.69; Q2: OR = 1.51, 95%CI: 1.10-2.08), lower awareness of the permission of vaccinating children (OR = 1.74, 95%CI: 1.36-2.23) and hesitancy to inoculate themselves (OR = 8.18, 95%CI: 6.48-10.33) were associated with parental hesitancy to inoculate their children. Results also revealed the disparity between fathers and mothers regarding associated factors.This study found that a substantial proportion of parents reported being hesitant to vaccinate children against COVID-19, implying the necessity of comprehensive assessment and health education programs for vaccination systems in China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fathers/psychology , Mothers/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Child , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fathers/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mothers/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
20.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 543, 2021 Aug 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1342808

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to understand the perceptions of new mothers using virtual care via video conferencing to gain insight into the benefits and barriers of virtual care for obstetric patients. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 patients attending the Kingston Health Sciences Centre. The interviews were 20-25 min in length and recorded through an audio recorder. Thematic analysis was conducted in order to derive the major themes explored in this study. RESULTS: New mothers must often adopt new routines to balance their needs and their child's needs. These routines could impact compliance and motivation to attend follow-up care. In our study, participants expressed high satisfaction with virtual care, emphasizing benefits related to comfort, convenience, communication, socioeconomic factors, and the ease of technology use. Participants also perceived that they could receive emotional support and build trust with their health care providers despite the remote nature of their care. Due to its ease of use and increased accessibility, we argue that virtual care shows promise to facilitate long-term compliance to care in obstetric patients. CONCLUSIONS: Virtual care is a useful modality that could improve compliance to obstetric care. Further research and clinical endeavours should examine how social factors and determinants intersect to determine how they underpin patient perceptions of virtual and in-person care.


Subject(s)
Mothers/psychology , Postnatal Care/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Videoconferencing , Adult , Canada/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Patient Compliance , Patient Satisfaction , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research , Social Determinants of Health
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