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2.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(4): e1009531, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231265

ABSTRACT

Most individuals who consume foods contaminated with the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) develop mild symptoms, while others are susceptible to life-threatening systemic infections (listeriosis). Although it is known that the risk of severe disease is increased in certain human populations, including the elderly, it remains unclear why others who consume contaminated food develop listeriosis. Here, we used a murine model to discover that pulmonary coinfections can impair the host's ability to adequately control and eradicate systemic Lm that cross from the intestines to the bloodstream. We found that the resistance of mice to oral Lm infection was dramatically reduced by coinfection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn), a bacterium that colonizes the respiratory tract and can also cause severe infections in the elderly. Exposure to Spn or microbial products, including a recombinant Lm protein (L1S) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), rendered otherwise resistant hosts susceptible to severe systemic Lm infection. In addition, we show that this increase in susceptibility was dependent on an increase in the production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) from Ncr1+ cells, including natural killer (NK) cells. Lastly, the ability of Ncr1+ cell derived IL-10 to increase disease susceptibility correlated with a dampening of both myeloid cell accumulation and myeloid cell phagocytic capacity in infected tissues. These data suggest that efforts to minimize inflammation in response to an insult at the respiratory mucosa render the host more susceptible to infections by Lm and possibly other pathogens that access the oral mucosa.


Subject(s)
Listeria monocytogenes/immunology , Listeriosis/immunology , Pneumonia/immunology , Animals , Disease Progression , Disease Susceptibility , Female , Interleukin-10/metabolism , Killer Cells, Natural/metabolism , Killer Cells, Natural/physiology , Lipopolysaccharides , Listeria monocytogenes/pathogenicity , Listeriosis/complications , Listeriosis/pathology , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Mouth Diseases/complications , Mouth Diseases/immunology , Mouth Diseases/microbiology , Mouth Diseases/pathology , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/etiology , Pneumonia/pathology
4.
Med Hypotheses ; 143: 110124, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-662554

ABSTRACT

Utilising biomarkers for COVID-19 diagnosis, prediction of treatment response and overall prognostication have been investigated recently. However, these ventures have only considered the use of blood-based molecular markers. Saliva is another biofluid that warrants being applied in similar fashion with major advantages that centres on its non-invasive and repeatable collection as well as cost-efficiency. To this end, this article presents a hypothesis for the sources of biomarkers useful clinically for COVID-19 disease outcome estimation and identify the likely implications of their detection in saliva.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Biomarkers/analysis , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Models, Immunological , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Saliva/chemistry , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cytokines/analysis , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Extracellular Vesicles , Gingival Crevicular Fluid/chemistry , Humans , MicroRNAs/analysis , Mouth Diseases/complications , Mouth Diseases/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Saliva/immunology , Saliva/virology , Salivary Glands/metabolism , Salivary Glands/virology , Salivary Proteins and Peptides/analysis
5.
Zhonghua Kou Qiang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 55(4): 235-240, 2020 Apr 09.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-324706

ABSTRACT

Public health emergencies have an impact on the public mental health. The outbreak of the novel coronavirus has affected the normal diagnosis and treatment services in stomatological institutions across the country. Delay of non-emergency dental service will have a potential impact on the experience, cognition, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with oral diseases. Through literature retrieving, this article reviewed the oral psychosomatic diseases closely related to a patient's psychological status, such as oral mucosal disease, temporomandibular joint disease, bruxism, periodontal disease and so on. It was believed that the patients with these disorders might be more susceptible to the impact of stress events, and need be paid more attention by dental specialists. At the same time, this article analyzes the possible psychological stress symptoms of patients with various oral diseases, and puts forward suggestions for remote consultation and emergency treatment of dentists. From the perspective of social role, dentist plays not only the role of expert for professional guidance in dentistry, but also the role of helper in psychological counseling for patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mouth Diseases/complications , Mouth Diseases/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological
6.
Clin Oral Investig ; 24(6): 2137-2138, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-197618

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Explore how to manage oral healthcare during the COVID-19 outbreak. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In order to solve oral healthcare during the COVID-19 outbreak, our hospital has taken effective measures: build a team of experts, which provide a 24-h hotline, online video consultation, and online training and push popular science articles on WeChat. For the treatment of emergency patients aside from routine epidemic prevention measures, some special measures for oral treatment need to be added. RESULTS: From January 23, 2020, to March 2, 2020, a total of 3035 patients received oral therapy during the COVID-19 epidemic in our hospital. To our knowledge, no oral health worker or patient has been infected with COVID-19 due to oral treatment, and no patients have complained about the suspension of treatment by complaints hotline. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 is a novel challenge for oral healthcare. Attention should be paid to oral healthcare during the outbreak of COVID-19. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: These experiences of oral healthcare can be used as a reference by stomatological hospitals and oral clinics during public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Mouth Diseases/therapy , Oral Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China , Emergency Medical Services , Humans , Mouth Diseases/complications , SARS-CoV-2
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