Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
1.
Neurol Sci ; 43(9): 5165-5168, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1877850

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several neurological complications have been reported following SARS-Cov-2 vaccination, without a clear causal relationship ever being verified, including some cases of worsening of Parkinson's disease (PD) symptoms and new onset of movement disorders in non-parkinsonian patients. METHODS: We describe two new cases of PD patients treated with device-aided therapy who developed worsening of parkinsonian symptoms after receiving the third vaccine dose (booster). We also conducted a short review of the cases reported in literature of PD symptoms worsening and new onset of movement disorders in non-parkinsonian patients after SARS-Cov-2 vaccination. RESULTS: The first patient, a 46-year-old man implanted with bilateral Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation, experienced temporary motor and non-motor symptoms worsening after mRNA-1273 booster, improved after stimulation settings modification. The second patient, a 55-year-old man implanted with percutaneous endoscopic transgastric jejunostomy (PEG-J) for levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) infusion experienced severe temporary worsening of dyskinesia and managed through temporary LCIG dose reduction. Other seven cases of vaccine-related movement disorder are currently reported in literature, four describing PD symptoms worsening and three the onset of new movement disorders in otherwise healthy people. CONCLUSION: Both our patients and the cases described so far completely recovered after few days with parkinsonian therapy modification, symptomatic treatment, or even spontaneously, underlining the transient and benign nature of side effects from vaccine. Patients should be reassured about these complications, manageable through a prompt evaluation by the reference neurologist.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Movement Disorders , Parkinson Disease , Vaccination , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Carbidopa/therapeutic use , Deep Brain Stimulation , Drug Combinations , Humans , Immunization, Secondary/adverse effects , Levodopa/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Movement Disorders/etiology , Movement Disorders/therapy , Parkinson Disease/etiology , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Treatment Outcome , Vaccination/adverse effects
2.
Eur J Neurol ; 29(4): 1243-1253, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The scientific literature on COVID-19 is increasingly growing. METHODS: In this paper, we review the literature on movement disorders in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: First, there are a variety of transient movement disorders that may manifest in the acute phase of COVID-19, most often myoclonus, with more than 50 patients described in the literature. New onset parkinsonism, chorea, and tic-like behaviours have also been reported. Movement disorders as a side effect after COVID-19 vaccination are rare, occurring with a frequency of 0.00002-0.0002 depending on the product used, mostly manifesting with tremor. Current evidence for potential long-term manifestations, for example, long COVID parkinsonism, is separately discussed. Second, the pandemic has also had an impact on patients with pre-existing movement disorder syndromes, with negative effects on clinical status and overall well-being, and reduced access to medication and health care. In many parts, the pandemic has led to reorganization of the medical system, including the development of new digital solutions. The movement disorder-related evidence for this is reviewed and discussed. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic and the associated preventive measures have had a negative impact on the clinical status, access to health care, and overall well-being of patients with pre-existing movement disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Movement Disorders , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Movement Disorders/epidemiology , Movement Disorders/etiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
JAMA Neurol ; 78(12): 1503-1509, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482083

ABSTRACT

Importance: Neuropsychiatric manifestations of COVID-19 have been reported in the pediatric population. Objective: To determine whether anti-SARS-CoV-2 and autoreactive antibodies are present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of pediatric patients with COVID-19 and subacute neuropsychiatric dysfunction. Design, Setting, and Participants: This case series includes 3 patients with recent SARS-CoV-2 infection as confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction or IgG serology with recent exposure history who were hospitalized at the University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children's Hospital and for whom a neurology consultation was requested over a 5-month period in 2020. During this period, 18 total children were hospitalized and tested positive for acute SARS-CoV-2 infection by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction or rapid antigen test. Main Outcomes and Measures: Detection and characterization of CSF anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG and antineural antibodies. Results: Of 3 included teenaged patients, 2 patients had intrathecal anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. CSF IgG from these 2 patients also indicated antineural autoantibodies on anatomic immunostaining. Autoantibodies targeting transcription factor 4 (TCF4) in 1 patient who appeared to have a robust response to immunotherapy were also validated. Conclusions and Relevance: Pediatric patients with COVID-19 and prominent subacute neuropsychiatric symptoms, ranging from severe anxiety to delusional psychosis, may have anti-SARS-CoV-2 and antineural antibodies in their CSF and may respond to immunotherapy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Autoantibodies/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Mental Disorders/cerebrospinal fluid , Mental Disorders/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Adolescent , Animals , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , Autoimmunity , Female , Humans , Male , Marijuana Smoking/immunology , Mice , Movement Disorders/etiology , Neurologic Examination , Transcription Factor 4/immunology
4.
J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab ; 34(12): 1611-1614, 2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405353

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The impact of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) on metabolic outcome in patients with inborn errors of metabolism has rarely been discussed. Herein, we report a case with an acute encephalopathic crisis at the course of COVID-19 disease as the first sign of glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA-1). CASE PRESENTATION: A 9-month-old patient was admitted with encephalopathy and acute loss of acquired motor skills during the course of COVID-19 disease. She had lethargy, hypotonia, and choreoathetoid movements. In terms of COVID-19 encephalopathy, the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay test for COVID-19 was negative in cerebral spinal fluid. Brain imaging showed frontotemporal atrophy, bilateral subcortical and periventricular white matter, basal ganglia, and thalamic involvement. Elevated glutarylcarnitine in plasma and urinary excretion of glutaric and 3-OH-glutaric acids was noted. A homozygote mutation in the glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase gene led to the diagnosis of GA-1. CONCLUSIONS: With this report, neurological damage associated with COVID-19 has been reported in GA-1 patients for the first time in literature.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors/complications , Brain Diseases, Metabolic/complications , Brain Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Glutaryl-CoA Dehydrogenase/deficiency , Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors/diagnostic imaging , Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors/genetics , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain Diseases/complications , Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Brain Diseases, Metabolic/diagnostic imaging , Brain Diseases, Metabolic/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19 Testing , Carnitine/analogs & derivatives , Carnitine/blood , Carnitine/urine , Female , Genetic Testing , Glutarates/blood , Glutarates/urine , Glutaryl-CoA Dehydrogenase/genetics , Humans , Infant , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Motor Skills , Movement Disorders/etiology , Muscle Hypotonia/etiology
6.
J Neuroimmunol ; 358: 577655, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293993

ABSTRACT

Movement disorders are extremely rare in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and in the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) infection. We herein report a 34-years-old previously healthy woman who presented with a febrile illness and a constellation of movement disorders (predominantly myoclonus) followed by encephalopathy. After exclusion of common infectious, autoimmune and paraneoplastic etiologies, she was diagnosed to have COVID-19 induced ADEM, which responded to intravenous methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin. Our case adds to the tally of cases of post-SARS-CoV-2 infection related movement disorders and to the exceedingly rare list of cases in which movement disorders preceded ADEM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Encephalomyelitis, Acute Disseminated/diagnostic imaging , Encephalomyelitis, Acute Disseminated/etiology , Movement Disorders/diagnostic imaging , Movement Disorders/etiology , Adult , Female , Humans
8.
Rev Neurol ; 71(12): 431-437, 2020 12 16.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-977846

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused a collapse situation in many hospitals around the world. The aim of this study is to analyse the utility of the electroencephalogram (EEG) in the management of the neurological patient during the COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Clinical Neurophysiology Department of the Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla was dissolved due to the hospital collapse situation. Therefore, the EEG was performed exceptionally in those cases with the greatest probability of providing a benefit in its management. We describe seven patients (four in ICU and three hospitalized) diagnosed with COVID-19, who underwent through an EEG. RESULTS: The EEG showed abnormalities in all cases, including one case of brain death. The EEG resulted in a change in clinical management in four of the patients (57%) and helped the clinician provide information to the family. In the other three cases, a toxic-metabolic origin was suspected before the EEG was performed, so it did not imply a change in the clinical management already proposed, although it facilitated a prognostic orientation. Slow polymorphic waves were evident in five cases. Five patients were unresponsive. Currently, one patient remain hospitalized and four have died. CONCLUSIONS: The EEG was useful and facilitated decision making in COVID-19 patients in whom it was requested. It guided the diagnosis in cases where CT was non-contributory and led to a change in therapeutic management in most patients. The most frequent findings were signs of encephalopathy and epileptiform discharges.


TITLE: Utilidad y valor pronóstico del electroencefalograma en la COVID-19 y la encefalopatía: patrones electroencefalográficos en una serie de casos.Introducción. La enfermedad por coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) causó el colapso de muchos hospitales. El objetivo de este estudio es analizar la utilidad del electroencefalograma (EEG) en el tratamiento del paciente neurológico durante la pandemia de COVID-19. Pacientes y métodos. El Servicio de Neurofisiología Clínica del Hospital Central de la Defensa Gómez Ulla fue disuelto debido a la situación de saturación hospitalaria. En consecuencia, se realizó un EEG excepcionalmente a los pacientes a los que tenía mayor probabilidad de aportar un beneficio en su tratamiento. Se describen siete pacientes (cuatro en cuidados intensivos y tres hospitalizados) diagnosticados con COVID-19 a quienes se les realizó un EEG. Resultados. El EEG mostró anormalidades en todos los casos, incluyendo un caso de muerte cerebral. El EEG supuso un cambio en el tratamiento clínico en cuatro de los pacientes (57%) y ayudó al clínico a informar a la familia. En los otros tres casos, se sospechó un origen tóxico-metabólico previo al EEG, por lo que no implicó un cambio en el tratamiento ya propuesto, aunque facilitó una orientación pronóstica. Se evidenciaron ondas lentas polimorfas en cinco casos. Actualmente, un paciente permanece hospitalizado y cuatro han fallecido. Conclusiones. El EEG fue de utilidad y facilitó la toma de decisiones en los pacientes con COVID-19 en los que se solicitó. Orientó al diagnóstico en casos en los que la tomografía computarizada no contribuyó y supuso un cambio en el tratamiento terapéutico en la mayoría de los pacientes. Los hallazgos más frecuentes fueron signos de encefalopatía y descargas epileptiformes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Electroencephalography , Encephalitis, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Comorbidity , Consciousness Disorders/etiology , Consciousness Disorders/physiopathology , Encephalitis, Viral/etiology , Female , Heart Arrest , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Movement Disorders/etiology , Movement Disorders/physiopathology , Nasopharynx/virology , Pandemics , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies
9.
IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng ; 28(12): 2837-2848, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-936597

ABSTRACT

Motor disorder is a typical symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Neurologists assess the severity of PD motor symptoms using the clinical rating scale, i.e., MDS-UPDRS. However, this assessment method is time-consuming and easily affected by the perception difference of assessors. In the recent outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019, telemedicine for PD has become extremely urgent for clinical practice. To solve these problems, we developed an automated and objective assessment method of the leg agility task in the MDS-UPDRS using videos and a graph neural network. In this study, a sparse adaptive graph convolutional network (SA-GCN) was proposed to achieve fine-grained quantitative assessment of skeleton sequences extracted from videos. Specifically, the sparse adaptive graph convolutional unit with a prior knowledge constraint was proposed to perform adaptive spatial modeling of physical and logical dependency for skeleton sequences, thus achieving the sparse modeling of the discriminative spatial relationships. Subsequently, a temporal context module was introduced to construct the remote context dependency in the temporal dimension, hence determining the global changes of the task. A multi-domain attention learning module was also developed to integrate the static spatial features and dynamic temporal features, and then to emphasize the salient feature selection in the channel domain, thereby capturing the multi-domain fine-grained information. Finally, the evaluation results using a dataset with 148 patients and 870 samples confirmed the effectiveness and reliability of our scheme, and the method outperformed other related state-of-the-art methods. Our contactless method provides a new potential tool for automated PD assessment and telemedicine.


Subject(s)
Leg/physiopathology , Parkinson Disease/diagnosis , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , Aged , Algorithms , Automation , COVID-19 , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Machine Learning , Male , Middle Aged , Movement Disorders/diagnosis , Movement Disorders/etiology , Movement Disorders/physiopathology , Neural Networks, Computer , Parkinson Disease/complications , Psychomotor Performance , Reproducibility of Results , Telemedicine/methods , Video Recording
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL