Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 27
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Artif Organs ; 45(12): 1522-1532, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526346

ABSTRACT

Disturbed oxygenation is foremost the leading clinical presentation in COVID-19 patients. However, a small proportion also develop carbon dioxide removal problems. The Advanced Organ Support (ADVOS) therapy (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany) uses a less invasive approach by combining extracorporeal CO2 -removal and multiple organ support for the liver and the kidneys in a single hemodialysis device. The aim of our study is to evaluate the ADVOS system as treatment option in-COVID-19 patients with multi-organ failure and carbon dioxide removal problems. COVID-19 patients suffering from severe respiratory insufficiency, receiving at least two treatments with the ADVOS multi system (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany), were eligible for study inclusion. Briefly, these included patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) according to KDIGO guidelines, and moderate or severe ARDS according to the Berlin definition, who were on invasive mechanical ventilation for more than 72 hours. In total, nine COVID-19 patients (137 ADVOS treatment sessions with a median of 10 treatments per patient) with moderate to severe ARDS and carbon dioxide removal problems were analyzed. During the ADVOS treatments, a rapid correction of acid-base balance and a continuous CO2 removal could be observed. We observed a median continuous CO2 removal of 49.2 mL/min (IQR: 26.9-72.3 mL/min) with some treatments achieving up to 160 mL/min. The CO2 removal significantly correlated with blood flow (Pearson 0.421; P < .001), PaCO2 (0.341, P < .001) and HCO 3 - levels (0.568, P < .001) at the start of the treatment. The continuous treatment led to a significant reduction in PaCO2 from baseline to the last ADVOS treatment. In conclusion, it was feasible to remove CO2 using the ADVOS system in our cohort of COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure. This efficient removal of CO2 was achieved at blood flows up to 300 mL/min using a conventional hemodialysis catheter and without a membrane lung or a gas phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Carbon Dioxide/blood , Extracorporeal Circulation/instrumentation , Lung/physiopathology , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , Renal Dialysis/instrumentation , Respiration, Artificial , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Extracorporeal Circulation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/physiopathology , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
2.
Artif Organs ; 45(12): 1522-1532, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1429491

ABSTRACT

Disturbed oxygenation is foremost the leading clinical presentation in COVID-19 patients. However, a small proportion also develop carbon dioxide removal problems. The Advanced Organ Support (ADVOS) therapy (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany) uses a less invasive approach by combining extracorporeal CO2 -removal and multiple organ support for the liver and the kidneys in a single hemodialysis device. The aim of our study is to evaluate the ADVOS system as treatment option in-COVID-19 patients with multi-organ failure and carbon dioxide removal problems. COVID-19 patients suffering from severe respiratory insufficiency, receiving at least two treatments with the ADVOS multi system (ADVITOS GmbH, Munich, Germany), were eligible for study inclusion. Briefly, these included patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) according to KDIGO guidelines, and moderate or severe ARDS according to the Berlin definition, who were on invasive mechanical ventilation for more than 72 hours. In total, nine COVID-19 patients (137 ADVOS treatment sessions with a median of 10 treatments per patient) with moderate to severe ARDS and carbon dioxide removal problems were analyzed. During the ADVOS treatments, a rapid correction of acid-base balance and a continuous CO2 removal could be observed. We observed a median continuous CO2 removal of 49.2 mL/min (IQR: 26.9-72.3 mL/min) with some treatments achieving up to 160 mL/min. The CO2 removal significantly correlated with blood flow (Pearson 0.421; P < .001), PaCO2 (0.341, P < .001) and HCO 3 - levels (0.568, P < .001) at the start of the treatment. The continuous treatment led to a significant reduction in PaCO2 from baseline to the last ADVOS treatment. In conclusion, it was feasible to remove CO2 using the ADVOS system in our cohort of COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiorgan failure. This efficient removal of CO2 was achieved at blood flows up to 300 mL/min using a conventional hemodialysis catheter and without a membrane lung or a gas phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Carbon Dioxide/blood , Extracorporeal Circulation/instrumentation , Lung/physiopathology , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , Renal Dialysis/instrumentation , Respiration, Artificial , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Extracorporeal Circulation/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/physiopathology , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
3.
Chest ; 160(3): e279-e283, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379053

ABSTRACT

CASE PRESENTATION: A 24-year-old previously healthy woman was brought to the hospital for acute altered mental status. One week prior to presentation, she had developed a sore throat, nausea, and vomiting. At that time, SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction and rapid streptococcal pharyngitis test results were both negative. On the day prior to presentation, the patient had developed an erythematous painful rash on her left arm. The following day she was noted to be agitated, combative, and having trouble communicating, prompting ED evaluation. In the ED, the patient was tachycardic to 108 beats/min and tachypneic to 30 breaths/min but normotensive and afebrile. Her initial workup was notable for leukocytosis with bandemia, acute liver injury with coagulopathy, and acute renal failure. She was intubated, transferred to our hospital, and admitted to the MICU. The patient's medical history was notable for obesity and oral contraceptive use. She had no family history of autoimmune, rheumatologic, or hematologic disorders. She was a student and worked part time in retail. She had no recent travel or outdoor exposure. The patient's family was unaware of any tobacco or drug use but did report that she drank socially.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Health , Acute Disease , Biopsy , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Mental Disorders/complications , Multiple Organ Failure/complications , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Young Adult
4.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 15872, 2021 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1345580

ABSTRACT

COVID-19-associated respiratory failure offers the unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the differential host response to a uniform pathogenic insult. Understanding whether there are distinct subphenotypes of severe COVID-19 may offer insight into its pathophysiology. Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score is an objective and comprehensive measurement that measures dysfunction severity of six organ systems, i.e., cardiovascular, central nervous system, coagulation, liver, renal, and respiration. Our aim was to identify and characterize distinct subphenotypes of COVID-19 critical illness defined by the post-intubation trajectory of SOFA score. Intubated COVID-19 patients at two hospitals in New York city were leveraged as development and validation cohorts. Patients were grouped into mild, intermediate, and severe strata by their baseline post-intubation SOFA. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering was performed within each stratum to detect subphenotypes based on similarities amongst SOFA score trajectories evaluated by Dynamic Time Warping. Distinct worsening and recovering subphenotypes were identified within each stratum, which had distinct 7-day post-intubation SOFA progression trends. Patients in the worsening suphenotypes had a higher mortality than those in the recovering subphenotypes within each stratum (mild stratum, 29.7% vs. 10.3%, p = 0.033; intermediate stratum, 29.3% vs. 8.0%, p = 0.002; severe stratum, 53.7% vs. 22.2%, p < 0.001). Pathophysiologic biomarkers associated with progression were distinct at each stratum, including findings suggestive of inflammation in low baseline severity of illness versus hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in higher baseline severity of illness. The findings suggest that there are clear worsening and recovering subphenotypes of COVID-19 respiratory failure after intubation, which are more predictive of outcomes than baseline severity of illness. Distinct progression biomarkers at differential baseline severity of illness suggests a heterogeneous pathobiology in the progression of COVID-19 respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/physiopathology , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 141: 111922, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309164

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 19 (Covid-19) pandemic is devastating the public health: it is urgent to find a viable therapy to reduce the multiorgan damage of the disease. A validated therapeutic protocol is still missing. The most severe forms of the disease are related to an exaggerated inflammatory response. The pivotal role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the amplification of inflammation makes the antioxidants a potential therapy, but clinical trials are needed. The lecitinized superoxide dismutase (PC-SOD) could represent a possibility because of bioaviability, safety, and its modulatory effect on the innate immune response in reducing the harmful consequences of oxidative stress. In this review we summarize the evidence on lecitinized superoxide dismutase in animal and human studies, to highlight the rationale for using the PC-SOD to treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Phosphatidylcholines/therapeutic use , Superoxide Dismutase/therapeutic use , Animals , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/drug therapy , Multiple Organ Failure/metabolism , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Pandemics , Phosphatidylcholines/pharmacology , Reactive Oxygen Species/antagonists & inhibitors , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Superoxide Dismutase/pharmacology
6.
Arch Argent Pediatr ; 119(3): e252-e255, 2021 06.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242314

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus infections (CoV) are common in pediatric patients. In general, they produce a mild clinical presentation consisting of an upper respiratory tract infection that does not usually infect the lungs, with the exception of preterm infants and children with chronic diseases. These infections exceptionally affect other organs (heart, brain, gastrointestinal tract), thus increasing their severity. In relation to the temporal coincidence with the beginning of the current situation of pandemic by the new beta coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 responsible for its associated disease (COVID-19), this study presents a clinical case of a 5-year-old patient showing multiple-organ failure and neurological sequelae due to bulbar injury and vascular thrombosis caused by an alpha coronavirus (CoV-NL63) due to its severity and exceptionality.


Las infecciones por coronavirus son habituales en los pacientes pediátricos. Por lo general, producen un cuadro clínico leve de infección del tracto respiratorio superior que no suele afectar a los pulmones, salvo en prematuros y niños con enfermedades crónicas de base. Excepcionalmente, afectan a otros órganos (corazón, cerebro, tracto gastrointestinal) e incrementan su gravedad. En relación con la coincidencia temporal con el inicio de la actual pandemia por el nuevo beta coronavirus (SARSCoV- 2), responsable de su enfermedad asociada (COVID-19), se presenta el caso clínico de un paciente de 5 años con fracaso multiorgánico y secuelas neurológicas por afectación bulbar y trombosis vascular ocasionados por un alfa coronavirus (CoVNL63) debido a su gravedad y excepcionalidad.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus NL63, Human/isolation & purification , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Diagnosis, Differential , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/complications
7.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(4)2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180949

ABSTRACT

Since the emergence of SARS-CoV-2, clinicians have been challenged with a wide spectrum of disease severity. One of the serious complications associated with the virus is multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). It is characterised by inflammation leading to organ damage, in the setting of positive SARS-CoV-2 infection. MIS-C is thought to be a postviral reaction where most children are negative on PCR testing but are positive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently defined the same phenomenon occurring in adults as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A) and emphasised on the use of antibody testing in this population. Here we describe an adult woman with an exposure to SARS-CoV-2 who presented with unexplained organ failure and shock. Positive antibody testing was the only clue to the diagnosis of MIS-A. We stress the importance of SARS-CoV-2 antibody detection in order to identify these cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Adult , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(15): e25255, 2021 Apr 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1180670

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Fibrinolysis shutdown associated with severe thrombotic complications is a recently recognized syndrome that was previously seldom investigated in patients with severe severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. It presents a unique therapeutic dilemma, as anticoagulation with heparin alone is insufficient to address the imbalance in fibrinolysis. And while the use of fibrinolytic agents could limit the disease severity, it is often associated with bleeding complications. There is a need for biomarkers that will guide the timely stratification of patients into those who may benefit from both anticoagulant and fibrinolytic therapies. PATIENT CONCERNS: All 3 patients presented with shortness of breath along with comorbidities predisposing them to severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. One patient (Patient 3) also suffered from bilateral deep venous thrombosis. DIAGNOSES: All 3 patients tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and were eventually diagnosed with respiratory failure necessitating intubation. INTERVENTIONS: All 3 patients required mechanical ventilation support, 2 of which also required renal replacement therapy. All 3 patients were also placed on anticoagulation therapy. OUTCOMES: In Patients 1 and 2, the initial D-dimer levels of 0.97 µg/ml fibrinogen equivalent units (FEU) and 0.83 µg/ml FEU were only slightly elevated (normal <0.50 µg/ml FEU). They developed rising D-dimer levels to a peak of 13.21 µg/ml FEU and >20.0 µg/ml FEU, respectively, which dropped to 1.34 µg/ml FEU 8 days later in Patient 1 and to 2.94 µg/ml on hospital day 13 in Patient 2. In Patient 3, the D-dimer level on admission was found to be elevated to >20.00 µg/ml FEU together with imaging evidence of thrombosis. And although he received therapeutic heparin infusion, he still developed pulmonary embolism (PE) and his D-dimer level declined to 5.91 µg/ml FEU. Despite "improvement" in their D-dimer levels, all 3 patients succumbed to multi-system organ failure. On postmortem examination, numerous arterial and venous thromboses of varying ages, many consisting primarily of fibrin, were identified in the lungs of all patients. LESSONS: High D-dimer levels, with subsequent downtrend correlating with clinical deterioration, seems to be an indicator of fibrinolysis suppression. These findings can help form a hypothesis, as larger cohorts are necessary to demonstrate their reproducibility.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Multiple Organ Failure , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Autopsy/methods , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Deterioration , Female , Fibrinolysis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Renal Replacement Therapy/methods , Respiration, Artificial/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Venous Thrombosis/blood , Venous Thrombosis/complications , Venous Thrombosis/diagnosis
9.
Scand J Gastroenterol ; 56(5): 585-587, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132187

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A relation between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and acute pancreatitis has been suggested. However, the incidence and clinical relevance of this relation remain unclear. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the incidence, severity and clinical impact of acute pancreatitis in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of a prospective, observational cohort concerning all COVID-19 patients admitted to two Dutch university hospitals between 4 March 2020 and 26 May 2020. Primary outcome was acute pancreatitis potentially related to COVD-19 infection. Acute pancreatitis was defined according to the revised Atlanta Classification. Potential relation with COVID-19 was defined as the absence of a clear aetiology of acute pancreatitis. RESULTS: Among 433 patients with COVID-19, five (1.2%) had potentially related acute pancreatitis according to the revised Atlanta Classification. These five patients suffered from severe COVID-19 infection; all had (multiple) organ failure and 60% died. None of the patients developed necrotizing pancreatitis. Moreover, development of acute pancreatitis did not lead to major treatment consequences. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast with previous research, our study demonstrated that COVID-19 related acute pancreatitis is rare and of little clinical impact. It is therefore debatable if acute pancreatitis in COVID-19 patients requires specific screening. We hypothesize that acute pancreatitis occurs in patients with severe illness due to COVID-19 infection as a result of transient hypoperfusion and pancreatic ischemia, not as a direct result of the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Organ Failure , Pancreas , Pancreatitis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Ischemia/etiology , Ischemia/physiopathology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/physiopathology , Netherlands/epidemiology , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pancreas/blood supply , Pancreas/physiopathology , Pancreatitis/diagnosis , Pancreatitis/epidemiology , Pancreatitis/etiology , Pancreatitis/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index
10.
JCI Insight ; 6(7)2021 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112383

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTIONThe clinical course of coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) is heterogeneous, ranging from mild to severe multiorgan failure and death. In this study, we analyzed cell-free DNA (cfDNA) as a biomarker of injury to define the sources of tissue injury that contribute to such different trajectories.METHODSWe conducted a multicenter prospective cohort study to enroll patients with COVID-19 and collect plasma samples. Plasma cfDNA was subject to bisulfite sequencing. A library of tissue-specific DNA methylation signatures was used to analyze sequence reads to quantitate cfDNA from different tissue types. We then determined the correlation of tissue-specific cfDNA measures to COVID-19 outcomes. Similar analyses were performed for healthy controls and a comparator group of patients with respiratory syncytial virus and influenza.RESULTSWe found markedly elevated levels and divergent tissue sources of cfDNA in COVID-19 patients compared with patients who had influenza and/or respiratory syncytial virus and with healthy controls. The major sources of cfDNA in COVID-19 were hematopoietic cells, vascular endothelium, hepatocytes, adipocytes, kidney, heart, and lung. cfDNA levels positively correlated with COVID-19 disease severity, C-reactive protein, and D-dimer. cfDNA profile at admission identified patients who subsequently required intensive care or died during hospitalization. Furthermore, the increased cfDNA in COVID-19 patients generated excessive mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) in renal tubular cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This mtROS production was inhibited by a TLR9-specific antagonist.CONCLUSIONcfDNA maps tissue injury that predicts COVID-19 outcomes and may mechanistically propagate COVID-19-induced tissue injury.FUNDINGIntramural Targeted Anti-COVID-19 grant, NIH.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cell-Free Nucleic Acids , Multiple Organ Failure , Organ Specificity/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers/analysis , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Cell-Free Nucleic Acids/analysis , Cell-Free Nucleic Acids/blood , Cohort Studies , DNA Methylation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology
12.
Med Clin (Barc) ; 155(5): 191-196, 2020 09 11.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-526756

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to assess organ function in 102 patients with severe COVID-19 infections, using retrospective clinical analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted on 102 patients with severe COVID-19 infections. The patients were divided into a survival group (n=73) and a non-survival group (n=29) according to their prognosis. The age, sex, underlying diseases, clinical laboratory data within 48h (routine blood tests, ALT, AST, TBIL, ALB, BUN, CR, D-Dimer, PT, APTT, FIB, F VIII:C, CK-MB, CK, and LDH), and ventilation status were collected. The organ functions of these severe COVID-19 patients were assessed by comparing the differences between the two groups. RESULTS: AST, BUN, CR, CK-MB, LDH, and CK in the non-survival group were higher than those in the survival group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). D-Dimer, PT, FIB, and F VIII:C in the non-survival group were higher than the values observed in the survival group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). PLT, AST, BUN, CR, D-Dimer, PT, FIB, F VIII:C, CK-MB, CK, and LDH predicted the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the COVID19 endpoint events and were 0.721, 0.854, 0.867, 0.757, 0.699, 0.679, 0.715, 0.811, 0.935, and 0.802, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results showed that there were different degrees of damage to the liver, kidneys, blood coagulation, and heart function in the non-survival group. In addition, PLT, AST, BUN, CR, D-Dimer, PT, FIB, F VIII:C, CK-MB, CK, and LDH had value in evaluating disease prognosis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Infect Chemother ; 27(2): 364-368, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-816672

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) can lead to severe disease or death and is characterized by a wide range of mild to severe symptoms. In addition to the lungs, studies have reported the involvement of the stomach, intestine, and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptors in the heart. CASE REPORT: We present a case of a patient with COVID-19 who died soon after developing multi-organ failure and myocardial injury due to COVID-19-associated pneumonia. A 71-year-old man who contracted COVID-19 was admitted to the hospital after presenting with fever for 7 days and developed dyspnea. Following treatment, his respiratory status worsened. Thus, he was transferred to our hospital for intensive care on day 11. Physical examination revealed fever, dyspnea, respiratory distress, and no chest pain. Invasive positive pressure ventilation was initiated for acute respiratory distress syndrome on day 14. On day 15, we observed renal, liver, and coagulation dysfunction, indicating multi-organ failure. Chest radiography did not show clear signs of an increased cardiothoracic ratio or pulmonary congestion. An electrocardiogram (ECG) showed signs of myocardial infarction, which was confirmed by elevated troponin I and creatine kinase levels. The patient's circulatory dynamics did not improve on medication, and he died on day 16. CONCLUSIONS: We report the case of a patient with severe COVID-19 who died from an exacerbation of myocardial injury. Clinicians should not only evaluate respiration but also assess the heart by performing a 12-lead ECG, echocardiogram, and myocardial injury marker examination. Together, these tools can help predict which patients will develop severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Creatine Kinase/blood , Electrocardiography/methods , Fatal Outcome , Heart Injuries/diagnosis , Heart Injuries/etiology , Humans , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardium/pathology , Radiography/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thorax/diagnostic imaging , Troponin I/blood
16.
J Atheroscler Thromb ; 28(1): 90-95, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736814

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is an acute infectious disease that spreads mainly via the respiratory route. Elderly patients or those with underlying diseases are more seriously affected. We report a case of COVID-19 infection in a geriatric patient with arteriovenous thrombosis of the right lower limb. Despite persistent anticoagulant therapy, the patient's arterial thrombosis continued to progress and presented with ischemic necrosis of the lower extremity. After amputation in this case, the levels of D-dimer and inflammatory cytokine increased progressively, and he presented with acute myocardial infarction, which progressed rapidly to multisystem organ failure. However, whether coronavirus can directly cause the damage of the cardiovascular system and thrombosis needs further investigation.


Subject(s)
Amputation , COVID-19 , Lower Extremity , Multiple Organ Failure , Myocardial Infarction , Postoperative Complications , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thrombosis , Aged , Amputation/adverse effects , Amputation/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Fatal Outcome , Femoral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Femoral Vein/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Lower Extremity/pathology , Lower Extremity/surgery , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Necrosis/etiology , Necrosis/surgery , Postoperative Complications/blood , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/physiopathology , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/physiopathology , Thrombosis/therapy , Ultrasonography/methods
18.
Br J Surg ; 107(10): e379, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-677649

ABSTRACT

HUMAN AND ANIMAL RIGHTS: Every patient has given permission for publication of information from the medical history as long as it is used for medical research purposes. INFORMED CONSENT: Informed consent was obtained from all the individual participants of the study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pancreatitis/diagnosis , Pancreatitis/therapy , Pandemics , Patient Care Team , Severity of Illness Index , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Pancreatitis/microbiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Pol Arch Intern Med ; 130(5): 390-399, 2020 05 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-627704

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) infection spread worldwide. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to identify the clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with severe incidence of SARS ­CoV­2 infection. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All adult patients (median [IQR] age, 52 [37-58] years) consecutively admitted to the Dabieshan Medical Center from January 30, 2020 to February 11, 2020 were collected and reviewed. Only patients diagnosed with COVID­19  according to the World Health Organization interim guidance were included in this retrospective cohort study. RESULTS: A total of 108 patients with COVID­19 were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty­five patients (23.1%) developed severe disease, and of those 12 patients (48%) died. Advanced age, comorbidities (most commonly hypertension), higher blood leukocyte count, neutrophil count, higher C­reactive protein level, D­dimer level, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score were associated with greater risk of COVID­19, and so were lower lymphocyte count and albumin level. Multivariable regress ion showed increasing odds of severe COVID­19 associated with higher SOFA score (odds ratio [OR], 2.45; 95% CI, 1.302-4.608; P = 0.005), and lymphocyte count less than 0.8 × 109/l (OR, 9.017; 95% CI, 2.808-28.857; P <0.001) on admission. Higher SOFA score (OR, 2.402; 95% CI, 1.313-4.395; P = 0.004) on admission was identified as risk factor for in­hospital death. CONCLUSIONS: Lymphocytopenia and a higher SOFA score on admission could help clinicians to identify patients at high risk for developing severe COVID­19. More related studies are needed in the future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Pandemics , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/diagnosis
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...