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1.
Virchows Arch ; 479(1): 97-108, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574264

ABSTRACT

Between April and June 2020, i.e., during the first wave of pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), 55 patients underwent long-term treatment in the intensive care unit at the University Hospital of Regensburg. Most of them were transferred from smaller hospitals, often due to the need for an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system. Autopsy was performed in 8/17 COVID-19-proven patients after long-term treatment (mean: 33.6 days). Autopsy revealed that the typical pathological changes occurring during the early stages of the disease (e.g., thrombosis, endothelitis, capillaritis) are less prevalent at this stage, while severe diffuse alveolar damage and especially coinfection with different fungal species were the most conspicuous finding. In addition, signs of macrophage activation syndrome was detected in 7 of 8 patients. Thus, fungal infections were a leading cause of death in our cohort of severely ill patients and may alter clinical management of patients, particularly in long-term periods of treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection , Lung Diseases, Fungal/microbiology , Lung/microbiology , Multiple Organ Failure/microbiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cause of Death , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lung Diseases, Fungal/mortality , Lung Diseases, Fungal/pathology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/microbiology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/pathology , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
2.
Clin Appl Thromb Hemost ; 27: 10760296211051764, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511654

ABSTRACT

The precise mechanisms of pathology in severe COVID-19 remains elusive. Current evidence suggests that inflammatory mediators are responsible for the manifestation of clinical symptoms that precedes a fatal response to infection. This review examines the nature of platelet activating factor and emphasizes the similarities between the physiological effects of platelet activating factor and the clinical complications of severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Platelet Activating Factor/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/mortality , Inflammation/pathology , Multiple Organ Failure/complications , Multiple Organ Failure/metabolism , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/metabolism , Thrombosis/mortality , Thrombosis/pathology
3.
Cytokine ; 149: 155727, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506763

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although pneumonia is the hallmark of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), multiple organ failure may develop in severe disease. TNFα receptors in their soluble form (sTNFR) are involved in the immune cascade in other systemic inflammatory processes such as septic shock, and could mediate the inflammatory activation of distant organs. The aim of this study is to analyse plasma levels of sTNFR 1 and 2 in association with organ failure and outcome in critically ill patients with COVID-19. METHODS: After informed consent, we included 122 adult patients with PCR-confirmed COVID-19 at ICU admission. Demographic data, illness severity scores, organ failure and survival at 30 days were collected. Plasma sTNFR 1 and 2 levels were quantified during the first days after ICU admission. Twenty-five healthy blood donors were used as control group. RESULTS: Levels of sTNFR were higher in severe COVID-19 patients compared to controls (p < 0.001). Plasma levels of sTNFR were associated to illness severity scores (SAPS 3 and SOFA), inflammation biomarkers such as IL-6, ferritin and PCT as well as development of AKI during ICU stay. sTNFR 1 higher than 2.29 ng/mL and? sTNFR 2 higher than 11.7 ng/mL were identified as optimal cut-offs to discriminate survivors and non-survivors 30 days after ICU admission and had an area under the curve in receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.75 and 0.67 respectively. CONCLUSION: Plasma levels of sTNFR 1 and 2 were higher in COVID-19 patients compared to controls and were strongly associated with other inflammatory biomarkers, severity of illness and acute kidney injury development during ICU stay. In addition, sTNFR 1 was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality after adjustment for age and respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness/mortality , Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor/blood , Biomarkers/blood , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Severity of Illness Index
4.
Crit Care Med ; 49(7): 1149-1158, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494026

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Circulating nucleosomes and their component histones have been implicated as pathogenic in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. However, their role in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome is unknown. DESIGN: We performed a prospective cohort study in children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, with plasma collection within 24 hours of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. We associated nucleosome levels with severity of acute respiratory distress syndrome and with nonpulmonary organ failures and tested for association of nucleosomes with PICU mortality and ventilator-free days at 28 days in univariate and multivariable analyses. We also performed proteomics of DNA-bound plasma proteins in a matched case-control study of septic children with and without acute respiratory distress syndrome in order to identify specific histone proteins elevated in acute respiratory distress syndrome. SETTING: Large academic tertiary-care PICU. PATIENTS: Intubated children meeting Berlin criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We enrolled 333 children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, with 69 nonsurvivors (21%). Plasma nucleosomes were correlated with acute respiratory distress syndrome severity and with the number of nonpulmonary organ failures at acute respiratory distress syndrome onset. Nucleosomes were higher (p < 0.001) in nonsurvivors (0.40 [interquartile range, 0.20-0.71] arbitrary units) relative to survivors (0.10 [interquartile range, 0.04-0.25] arbitrary units). Nucleosomes were associated with PICU mortality in multivariable analysis (adjusted odds ratio 1.84 per 1 sd increase; 95% CI, 1.38-2.45; p < 0.001). Nucleosomes were also associated with a lower probability of being extubated alive by day 28 after multivariable adjustment (adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.88; p = 0.001). Proteomic analysis demonstrated higher levels of the core nucleosome histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 in septic children with acute respiratory distress syndrome, relative to septic children without acute respiratory distress syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma nucleosomes are associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome severity, nonpulmonary organ failures, and worse outcomes in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome.


Subject(s)
Histones/blood , Nucleosomes/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Adolescent , Airway Extubation , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , DNA/blood , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Proteomics , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Sepsis/blood , Sepsis/complications , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Rate
5.
Med Intensiva (Engl Ed) ; 45(6): 325-331, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343315

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe outcomes of critically ill patients with COVID-19, particularly the association of renal replacement therapy to mortality. DESIGN: A single-center prospective observational study was carried out. SETTING: ICU of a tertiary care center. PATIENTS: Consecutive adults with COVID-19 admitted to the ICU. INTERVENTION: Renal replacement therapy. MAIN VARIABLES OF INTEREST: Demographic data, medical history, illness severity, type of oxygen therapy, laboratory data and use of renal replacement therapy to generate a logistic regression model describing independent risk factors for mortality. RESULTS: Of the total of 166 patients, 51% were mechanically ventilated and 26% required renal replacement therapy. The overall hospital mortality rate was 36%, versus 56% for those requiring renal replacement therapy, and 68% for those with both mechanical ventilation and renal replacement therapy. The logistic regression model identified four independent risk factors for mortality: age (adjusted OR 2.8 [95% CI 1.8-4.4] for every 10-year increase), mechanical ventilation (4.2 [1.7-10.6]), need for continuous venovenous hemofiltration (2.3 [1.3-4.0]) and C-reactive protein (1.1 [1.0-1.2] for every 10mg/L increase). CONCLUSIONS: In our cohort, acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy was associated to a high mortality rate similar to that associated to the need for mechanical ventilation, while multiorgan failure necessitating both techniques implied an extremely high mortality risk.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness/therapy , Renal Replacement Therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/blood , Comorbidity , Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy , Critical Illness/mortality , District of Columbia/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Procedures and Techniques Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Prospective Studies , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Risk Factors , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Treatment Outcome
6.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 611526, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305635

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been reported that dyslipidemia is related to coronavirus-related diseases. Critical patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who suffered from multiple organ dysfunctions were treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) in Wuhan, China. Whether the lipids profile was associated with the prognosis of COVID-19 in critical patients remained unclear. Methods: A retrospective study was performed in critical patients (N=48) with coronavirus disease 2019 in Leishenshan hospital between February and April 2020 in Wuhan. The parameters including lipid profiles, liver function, and renal function were collected on admission day, 2-3days after the admission, and the day before the achievement of clinical outcome. Results: Albumin value and creatine kinase (ck) value were statistically decreased at 2-3 days after admission compared with those on admission day (P<0.05). Low density lipoprotein (LDL-c), high density lipoprotein (HDL-c), apolipoprotein A (ApoA), and apolipoprotein A (Apo B) levels were statistically decreased after admission (P<0.05). Logistic regression showed that HDL-c level both on admission day and the day before the achievement of clinical outcome were negatively associated with mortality in critical patients with COVID-19. Total cholesterol (TC) level at 2-3days after admission was related to mortality in critical patients with COVID-19. Conclusions: There were lipid metabolic disorders in the critical patients with COVID-19. Lower levels of HDL-c and TC were related to the progression of critical COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Dyslipidemias/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Apolipoproteins A/blood , Apolipoproteins B/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cholesterol/blood , Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Cholesterol, LDL/blood , Critical Illness , Dyslipidemias/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
7.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 224, 2021 06 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286832

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies reporting the causes of death in patients with severe COVID-19 have provided conflicting results. The objective of this study was to describe the causes and timing of death in patients with severe COVID-19 admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: We performed a retrospective study in eight ICUs across seven French hospitals. All consecutive adult patients (aged ≥ 18 years) admitted to the ICU with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and acute respiratory failure were included in the analysis. The causes and timing of ICU deaths were reported based on medical records. RESULTS: From March 1, 2020, to April 28, 287 patients were admitted to the ICU for SARS-CoV-2 related acute respiratory failure. Among them, 93 patients died in the ICU (32%). COVID-19-related multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) was the leading cause of death (37%). Secondary infection-related MODS accounted for 26% of ICU deaths, with a majority of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Refractory hypoxemia/pulmonary fibrosis was responsible for death in 19% of the cases. Fatal ischemic events (venous or arterial) occurred in 13% of the cases. The median time from ICU admission to death was 15 days (25th-75th IQR, 7-27 days). COVID-19-related MODS had a median time from ICU admission to death of 14 days (25th-75th IQR: 7-19 days), while only one death had occurred during the first 3 days since ICU admission. CONCLUSIONS: In our multicenter observational study, COVID-19-related MODS and secondary infections were the two leading causes of death, among severe COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Cause of Death , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypoxia/mortality , Hypoxia/virology , Intensive Care Units , Ischemia/mortality , Ischemia/virology , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/mortality , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/mortality , Pulmonary Fibrosis/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Med Virol ; 93(3): 1652-1664, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196493

ABSTRACT

Multiorgan injury has been implicated in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We aim to assess the impact of organ injury (OI) on prognosis according to the number of affected organs at admission. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients with confirmed COVID-19 in Wuhan Third Hospital & Tongren Hospital of Wuhan University from February 17 to March 22, 2020. We classified the patients according to the presence and number of damaged organs (heart, liver, and kidney). The percentage of patients with no, one, two, or three organs affected was 59.75%, 30.46%, 8.07%, and 1.72%, respectively. With the increasing number of OI, there is a tendency of gradual increase regarding the white blood cell counts, neutrophil counts, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), lactate dehydrogenase, D-dimer, and fibrinogen as well as the incidence of most complications. In a Cox regression model, individuals with OI, old age, and an abnormal level of CRP were at a higher risk of death compared with those without. Patients with three organ injuries had the highest mortality rate (57.9%; hazard ratio [HR] with 95% confidence interval [CI] vs. patients without OI: 22.31 [10.42-47.77], those with two [23.6%; HR = 8.68, 95% CI = 4.58-16.48], one [8.6%; HR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.7-5.7], or no OI [2.6%]; p < .001). The increasing number of OI was associated with a high risk of mortality in COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Female , Fibrinogen/metabolism , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/metabolism , Leukocyte Count/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/metabolism , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 4263, 2021 02 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091460

ABSTRACT

Infection by the new corona virus strain SARS-CoV-2 and its related syndrome COVID-19 has been associated with more than two million deaths worldwide. Patients of higher age and with preexisting chronic health conditions are at an increased risk of fatal disease outcome. However, detailed information on causes of death and the contribution of pre-existing health conditions to death yet is missing, which can be reliably established by autopsy only. We performed full body autopsies on 26 patients that had died after SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 at the Charité University Hospital Berlin, Germany, or at associated teaching hospitals. We systematically evaluated causes of death and pre-existing health conditions. Additionally, clinical records and death certificates were evaluated. We report findings on causes of death and comorbidities of 26 decedents that had clinically presented with severe COVID-19. We found that septic shock and multi organ failure was the most common immediate cause of death, often due to suppurative pulmonary infection. Respiratory failure due to diffuse alveolar damage presented as immediate cause of death in fewer cases. Several comorbidities, such as hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and obesity were present in the vast majority of patients. Our findings reveal that causes of death were directly related to COVID-19 in the majority of decedents, while they appear not to be an immediate result of preexisting health conditions and comorbidities. We therefore suggest that the majority of patients had died of COVID-19 with only contributory implications of preexisting health conditions to the mechanism of death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Cause of Death , Hospital Mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autopsy , Berlin/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitals, Teaching/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Myocardial Ischemia/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Shock, Septic/mortality , Shock, Septic/virology
10.
Med Clin (Barc) ; 155(5): 191-196, 2020 09 11.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-526756

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of our study was to assess organ function in 102 patients with severe COVID-19 infections, using retrospective clinical analysis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted on 102 patients with severe COVID-19 infections. The patients were divided into a survival group (n=73) and a non-survival group (n=29) according to their prognosis. The age, sex, underlying diseases, clinical laboratory data within 48h (routine blood tests, ALT, AST, TBIL, ALB, BUN, CR, D-Dimer, PT, APTT, FIB, F VIII:C, CK-MB, CK, and LDH), and ventilation status were collected. The organ functions of these severe COVID-19 patients were assessed by comparing the differences between the two groups. RESULTS: AST, BUN, CR, CK-MB, LDH, and CK in the non-survival group were higher than those in the survival group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). D-Dimer, PT, FIB, and F VIII:C in the non-survival group were higher than the values observed in the survival group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). PLT, AST, BUN, CR, D-Dimer, PT, FIB, F VIII:C, CK-MB, CK, and LDH predicted the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the COVID19 endpoint events and were 0.721, 0.854, 0.867, 0.757, 0.699, 0.679, 0.715, 0.811, 0.935, and 0.802, respectively. CONCLUSION: The results showed that there were different degrees of damage to the liver, kidneys, blood coagulation, and heart function in the non-survival group. In addition, PLT, AST, BUN, CR, D-Dimer, PT, FIB, F VIII:C, CK-MB, CK, and LDH had value in evaluating disease prognosis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/blood , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Blood Purif ; 50(4-5): 520-530, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992129

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Critically ill patients with COVID-19 may develop multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, including acute kidney injury (AKI). We report the incidence, risk factors, associations, and outcomes of AKI and renal replacement therapy (RRT) in critically ill COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with COVID-19 diagnosis admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) between March 2020 and May 2020. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was applied to identify risk factors for the development of AKI and use of RRT. The primary outcome was 60-day mortality after ICU admission. RESULTS: 101 (50.2%) patients developed AKI (72% on the first day of invasive mechanical ventilation [IMV]), and thirty-four (17%) required RRT. Risk factors for AKI included higher baseline Cr (OR 2.50 [1.33-4.69], p = 0.005), diuretic use (OR 4.14 [1.27-13.49], p = 0.019), and IMV (OR 7.60 [1.37-42.05], p = 0.020). A higher C-reactive protein level was an additional risk factor for RRT (OR 2.12 [1.16-4.33], p = 0.023). Overall 60-day mortality was 14.4% {23.8% (n = 24) in the AKI group versus 5% (n = 5) in the non-AKI group (HR 2.79 [1.04-7.49], p = 0.040); and 35.3% (n = 12) in the RRT group versus 10.2% (n = 17) in the non-RRT group, respectively (HR 2.21 [1.01-4.85], p = 0.047)}. CONCLUSIONS: AKI was common among critically ill COVID-19 patients and occurred early in association with IMV. One in 6 AKI patients received RRT and 1 in 3 patients treated with RRT died in hospital. These findings provide important prognostic information for clinicians caring for these patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Renal Replacement Therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Kidney Injury/blood , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brazil/epidemiology , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Comorbidity , Creatinine/blood , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
14.
Blood Purif ; 50(4-5): 513-519, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975762

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, pneumonia associated with COVID-19 has spread from Wuhan to other areas in China. In the present study, we aimed to further clarify the clinical features and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients infected with COVID-19 in Xiangyang, Hubei, China. METHODS: All confirmed cases of COVID-19 with AKI in Xiangyang Central Hospital from January 22 to May 31, 2020, were included in this retrospective study. Data of epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, radiological tests, treatment, complication, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. Patients were divided into intensive care unit (ICU) group and isolation ward (non-ICU) group. RESULTS: Of the total patients, 33.3% in the non-ICU group and 85.7% in the ICU group had chronic diseases. In addition, 85.7% of patients in the ICU group died. The most common symptoms were fever, cough, and fatigue. The lymphocyte count in the ICU group was significantly reduced compared with the non-ICU group. The chest computed tomography (CT) images appeared showed multiple mottles and ground-glass opacity. Strip shadow could be found in chest CT images of some recovered patients. All patients received antiviral treatment. Most patients in the ICU group were given methylprednisolone, immunoglobulin, antibiotics, and mechanical ventilation and 35.7% of patients in the ICU group received continuous renal replacement therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly with chronic comorbidities were more susceptible to COVID-19, showing a higher mortality rate due to multiple organ damage, and 35.7% of patients with AKI in ICU received renal replacement therapy. Moreover, part of the cured patients might need additional time to recover for poor lung function.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Hospital Mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Agents/therapeutic use , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Chronic Disease/mortality , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitals, Urban/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Plasma Exchange/methods , Plasma Exchange/statistics & numerical data , Renal Dialysis/methods , Renal Dialysis/statistics & numerical data , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Symptom Assessment , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
15.
J Med Virol ; 93(4): 2021-2028, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-798885

ABSTRACT

Recent literature suggests that approximately 5%-18% of patients diagnosed with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 may progress rapidly to a severe form of the illness and subsequent death. We examined the relationship between sociodemographic, clinical, and laboratory findings with mortality among patients. In this study, 112 patients were evaluated from February to May 2020 and 80 patients met the inclusion criteria. Tocilizumab was administered, followed by methylprednisolone to patients with pneumonia severity index score ≤130 and computerized tomography scan changes. Demographic data and clinical outcomes were collected. Laboratory biomarkers were monitored during hospitalization. Statistical analyses were performed with significance p ≤ .05. A total of 80 patients: 45 males (56.25%) and 35 females (43.75%) met the study inclusion criteria. A total of 7 patients (8.75%) were deceased. An increase in mortality outcome was statistically significantly associated with higher average levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) with p value (.050), and d-dimer with p value (.024). Bivariate logistics regression demonstrated a significant increased odds for mortality for patients with bacterial lung infections (odds ratio [OR]: 10.83; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.05-57.40; p = .005) and multiorgan damage (OR: 103.50; 95% CI: 9.92-1079.55; p = .001). Multivariate logistics regression showed a statistically significant association for multiorgan damage (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 94.17; 95% CI: 7.39-1200.78; p = .001). We identified three main predictors for high mortality. These include IL-6, d-dimer, and multiorgan damage. The latter was the highest potential risk for in-hospital deaths. This warrants aggressive health measures for early recognition of the problem and initiation of treatment to reverse injuries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/metabolism , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/virology , Prognosis , Risk Factors , Texas
16.
J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) ; 22(10): 1780-1788, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-767484

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is associated with high incidence of multiorgan dysfunction and death. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which facilitates SARS-CoV-2 host cell entry, may be impacted by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), two commonly used antihypertensive classes. In a multicenter, international randomized controlled trial that began enrollment on March 31, 2020, participants are randomized to continuation vs withdrawal of their long-term outpatient ACEI or ARB upon hospitalization with COVID-19. The primary outcome is a hierarchical global rank score incorporating time to death, duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of renal replacement or vasopressor therapy, and multiorgan dysfunction severity. Approval for the study has been obtained from the Institutional Review Board of each participating institution, and all participants will provide informed consent. A data safety monitoring board has been assembled to provide independent oversight of the project.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/pharmacology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , COVID-19/complications , Multiple Organ Failure/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Adult , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/adverse effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/adverse effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Prospective Studies , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use , Withholding Treatment/statistics & numerical data
17.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(36): e21596, 2020 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-752040

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Globally, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is still spreading rapidly. At present, there are no specifically approved therapeutic agents or vaccines for its treatment. Previous studies have shown that the convalescent plasma therapy (CPT) is effective in patients with COVID-19. However, its efficacy in patients with persistently positive nucleic acid test is unknown. PATIENT CONCERNS: In this report, we present the clinical data of 5 critically ill COVID-19 patients admitted, between January 16 and February 26, 2020, in intensive care unit of Xiaogan Central Hospital. DIAGNOSIS AND INTERVENTIONS: All these patients had a persistently positive nucleic acid test and received CPT. All 5 patients had severe respiratory failure, and thus, required invasive mechanical ventilation. The median time from the onset of symptoms to initiating the CPT was 37 (Interquartile range, 34-44) days. OUTCOMES: Only 2 patients were cured and subsequently discharged, while 3 patients succumbed due to multiple organ failure. CONCLUSION: The time of initiating the CPT may be an important factor affecting its efficacy, and its therapeutic effect in the treatment of COVID-19, in the late stage, is limited.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , APACHE , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Critical Illness/mortality , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Cleve Clin J Med ; 87(7): 384-388, 2020 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-186659

ABSTRACT

Information about the clinical presentation and course of COVID-19 is evolving rapidly. On presentation, cough and fever predominate, but extrapulmonary symptoms are also common; in some patients, loss of sense of smell may be an early but favorable sign. The mortality rate varies widely in different reports but should become clearer as more data are collected. Risk factors for severe disease and death include comorbid conditions such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Other implicated factors include older age, obesity, end-stage renal disease, and a higher neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Multiple Organ Failure , Pneumonia, Viral , Symptom Assessment/methods , COVID-19 , Clinical Deterioration , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Mortality , Multiple Chronic Conditions/epidemiology , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/mortality , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Analysis , Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data
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