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1.
Rev. Nutr. (Online) ; 35: e210231, 2022. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1978905

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective The Coronavirus disease 2019 is a global public health problem that has led to psychological disorders (depression, anxiety, etc.), especially in fragile individuals such as those affected by multiple sclerosis. This study investigated the relationship between anxiety and nutritional habits during the Coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak in multiple sclerosis patients. Methods This cross-sectional study was an online survey of multiple sclerosis patients living in Turkey. The total sample consisted of 294 multiple sclerosis patients. A questionnaire containing general demographic data, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and nutritional attitudes and habits was applied to multiple sclerosis patients. Results Moderate or severe anxiety scores were found in 42.2% of multiple sclerosis patients. Weight gain was reported in 40.5% of them during the outbreak. A statistically significant difference was found in the distribution of individuals' Beck Anxiety Inventory scores for consumption of nuts/seeds, rice/pasta, cake/cookies, and water. A 1-unit increase in Beck Anxiety Inventory scores led to a 1.04 times increased consumption of bread and rice/pasta and a 1.05 times increased consumption of cake/cookies either before or after controlling for potential confounders. A 1-unit increase in Beck Anxiety Inventory scores led to a 1.06 times decreased consumption of water and a 1.04 times decreased consumption of meat and poultry, fruit (fresh), and rice/pasta, either before or after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusion During the Coronavirus disease 2019 outbreak, anxiety led to changes in multiple sclerosis patients' nutritional habits and food preferences. The continuous surveillance of psychological consequences and nutritional counseling during outbreaks should become routine as part of preparedness efforts worldwide.


RESUMO Objetivo A doença do Coronavírus - 2019, causada pelo Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), é um problema de saúde pública global e tem levado os indivíduos desenvolverem distúrbios psicológicos (depressão, ansiedade, etc.), especialmente indivíduos frágeis, como aqueles afetados por esclerose múltipla. O objetivo deste trabalho foi investigar a relação entre ansiedade e hábitos nutricionais em pacientes com esclerose múltipla durante o surto de coronavírus. Métodos Este estudo transversal é resultado de uma pesquisa online com pacientes com esclerose múltipla que vivem na Turquia (n=294). Um formulário de questionário contendo dados demográficos gerais, o Inventário de Ansiedade de Beck e atitudes e hábitos nutricionais foi aplicado a pacientes com esclerose múltipla. Resultados Escores de ansiedade moderados ou graves foram encontrados em 42,2% dos pacientes com esclerose múltipla. O ganho de peso foi relatado em 40,5% durante o surto. Foi encontrada diferença estatisticamente significativa na distribuição dos escores do Inventário de Ansiedade de Beck dos indivíduos para o consumo de nozes/sementes, arroz/massa, bolo/biscoitos e água. Um aumento de uma unidade nas pontuações do Inventário de Ansiedade de Beck levou a um aumento de 1,04 vezes no consumo de pão e arroz/massa e 1,05 vezes no consumo de bolo/biscoitos antes ou depois de controlar possíveis fatores de confusão. Um aumento de uma unidade nas pontuações do Inventário de Ansiedade de Beck levou a uma redução de 1,06 vezes no consumo de água e 1,04 vezes no consumo de carnes e aves, frutas (frescas) e arroz/massa antes ou depois de controlar possíveis fatores de confusão. Conclusão Durante o surto de coronavírus, a ansiedade levou a mudanças nos hábitos nutricionais e nas preferências alimentares dos pacientes com esclerose múltipla. A vigilância contínua das consequências psicológicas e o aconselhamento nutricional para surtos devem se tornar rotina como parte dos esforços de preparação em todo o mundo.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Young Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Feeding Behavior/ethnology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Turkey/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies
2.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0267245, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1910594

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: REsilience and Activities for every DaY (READY) is an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-based group resilience-training program that has preliminary empirical support in promoting quality of life and other psychosocial outcomes in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). Consistent with the Medical Research Council framework for developing and evaluating complex interventions, we conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT), followed by a phase III RCT. The present paper describes the phase III RCT protocol. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a multi-centre cluster RCT comparing READY with a group relaxation program (1:1 ratio) in 240 PwMS from eight centres in Italy (trial registration: isrctn.org Identifier: ISRCTN67194859). Both interventions are composed of 7 weekly sessions plus a booster session five weeks later. Resilience (primary outcome), mood, health-related quality of life, well-being and psychological flexibility will be assessed at baseline, after the booster session, and at three and six month follow-ups. If face-to-face group meetings are interrupted because of COVID-19 related-issues, participants will be invited to complete their intervention via teleconferencing. Relevant COVID-19 information will be collected and the COVID-19 Peritraumatic Distress scale will be administered (ancillary study) at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Analysis will be by intention-to-treat to show superiority of READY over relaxation. Longitudinal changes will be compared between the two arms using repeated-measures, hierarchical generalized linear mixed models. CONCLUSION: It is expected that his study will contribute to the body of evidence on the efficacy and effectiveness of READY by comparing it with an active group intervention in frontline MS rehabilitation and clinical settings. Results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and at other relevant conferences.


Subject(s)
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy , COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Clinical Trials, Phase III as Topic , Humans , Italy , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
3.
Mult Scler ; 28(7): 1072-1080, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861986

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccine willingness among people living with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) requires assessment following the approval of the first COVID-19 vaccines, since there remains uncertainty on multiple aspects of COVID-19 vaccination in immunosuppressed patients. OBJECTIVE: To understand COVID-19 and influenza vaccine willingness and its associations among PwMS, following the approval of the first two mRNA COVID-19 vaccines. METHODS: A survey was distributed to PwMS via an online platform from December 2020 to February 2021. Logistic regression models were constructed to determine the relationship between (1) COVID-19 and (2) influenza vaccination willingness with demographic and clinical characteristics. RESULTS: Of 701 responding PwMS, 76.6% were COVID-19 vaccine willing. COVID-19 vaccine willingness was significantly associated with influenza vaccine willingness (p < 0.001). In multivariable models, older age increased the odds of COVID-19 and influenza vaccine willingness (odds ratios (ORs) > 1) and other race decreased the odds of COVID-19 and influenza vaccine willingness (ORs < 1); higher functional disability decreased the odds of COVID-19 vaccine willingness (OR = 0.88, 95% confidence interval = 0.80-0.96). Prevalent vaccine-related concerns include safety (n = 244) and efficacy (n = 122). CONCLUSION: Our findings identify demographic and clinical factors as well as concerns influencing vaccine hesitancy in PwMS. These results may inform effective public health interventions to improve vaccine acceptability in this at-risk group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Multiple Sclerosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/psychology
4.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 63: 103888, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1851848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The present cross-national study addressed the relationship among three pandemic-related variables and multiple sclerosis (MS) disability outcomes among people with MS in Italy and the United States (US). METHODS: This cross-sectional web-based study was administered to 708 patients with MS from the US and Italy in late Spring through mid-Summer of 2020. Pandemic-related variables assessed worry, self-protection, and post-traumatic growth. The Performance Scales© assessed MS disability. Multivariate multiple regression models addressed, separately by country, the relationship among worry, protection, and post-traumatic growth with MS disability, after covariate adjustment. RESULTS: The Italian sample (n = 292) was younger and less disabled than the US group (n = 416). After covariate adjustment, all three pandemic-related variables were associated with MS disability outcomes in the US sample, but only worry and post-traumatic growth were associated in the Italian sample. Worse cognitive and depression symptoms were associated with worry, and lesser mobility disability was associated with endorsed growth in both countries. More disability variables were associated with worry and growth in the Italian sample. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic's negative aspects were associated with worse disability in both countries, and reported post-traumatic growth was associated with lesser disability. These findings may suggest directions for clinical intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/complications , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , United States/epidemiology
5.
Acta Neurol Belg ; 122(1): 23-29, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653825

ABSTRACT

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has taken the lives of nearly 5.2 million up to now. With no definite treatment and considering close contact as the primary mode of transmission, telemedicine has emerged as an essential medical care platform. Virtual medical communications have offered clinicians the opportunity to visit and follow up on patients more efficiently during the lockdown. Not only has telemedicine improved multiple sclerosis (MS) patients' health and quality of life during the pandemic, but it could also be used as a cost-effective platform for physical and cognitive MS rehabilitation programs. Cognitive impairment is a common problem among MS patients even at the initial phases of the disease. Rehabilitation training programs such as RehaCom, BrainHQ, Speed of Processing Training (PST), and COGNI-TRAcK have made great strides in improving a wide range of cognitive functions that MS patients are challenged with. Regarding the impact of COVID-19 on the cognitive aspects of MS patients, efforts to implement rehabilitation training applications have been increased. Web-based mobile applications, virtual visits, and telephone follow-ups are examples of such efforts. Having said that, limitations such as privacy, socioeconomic disparities, e-health literacy, study settings, and challenges of neurologic examinationss have been raised. Since most MS patients are young, all the beneficiaries are encouraged to embrace the research in the field to pave the road for more feasible and efficient ways of cognitive enhancement in MS patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Dysfunction/rehabilitation , Communicable Disease Control , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Telemedicine , Cognition , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/psychology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Pandemics , Quality of Life
6.
Neurol Sci ; 43(4): 2263-2269, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1640878

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus outbreak, which emerged in Wuhan, China, in late 2019 and spread to the world, has changed each of our lives. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of quarantine on depression, anxiety, sleep quality, fatigue, and SF-36 of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients during the COVID-19 outbreak and differences between healthy controls (HC). METHODS: Eighty-six MS patients and 65 HC patients were included in the study. Participants filled out the various scales through face-to-face interviews for mental health assessment from January 15 to February 15, 2021. RESULTS: When both groups were compared in terms of BECK-D inventory (p < 0.001), BECK-A inventory (p = 0.010), and FS (p < 0.001), the patient group had significantly higher results. Physical functioning (p < 0.001), physical role limitation (p = 0.001), energy vitality rates (p = 0.010), and general health perception (p < 0.001) were higher in the HC group. When MS patients were divided according to EDSS scores, BECK-A (p < 0.001), BECK-D (p = 0.001), and PSQI (p = 0.006) scores of the patients with EDSS > 3 were higher, while emotional role restriction rates (p = 0.006), energy and vitality (p = 0.018), and pain (p = 0.005) were significantly lower than those with EDSS ≤ 3. When MS patients were divided into two groups as who had COVID-19 and who did not and compared SF-36 subscale scores, pain, (p = 0.049) and mental status (p = 0.030) were obtained significant differences in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our study revealed that MS patients, who are more susceptible to the new 'normal' that emerged during the pandemic period, are among the priority groups that should be supported in terms of mental health as well as physical health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Humans , Mental Health , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Pandemics , Quality of Life/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Ann Clin Transl Neurol ; 8(4): 918-928, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1092494

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report initial results of a planned multicenter year-long prospective study examining the risk and impact of COVID-19 among persons with neuroinflammatory disorders (NID), particularly multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: In April 2020, we deployed online questionnaires to individuals in their home environment to assess the prevalence and potential risk factors of suspected COVID-19 in persons with NID (PwNID) and change in their neurological care. RESULTS: Our cohort included 1115 participants (630 NID, 98% MS; 485 reference) as of 30 April 2020. 202 (18%) participants, residing in areas with high COVID-19 case prevalence, met the April 2020 CDC symptom criteria for suspected COVID-19, but only 4% of all participants received testing given testing shortages. Among all participants, those with suspected COVID-19 were younger, more racially diverse, and reported more depression and liver disease. PwNID had the same rate of suspected COVID-19 as the reference group. Early changes in disease management included telemedicine visits in 21% and treatment changes in 9% of PwNID. After adjusting for potential confounders, increasing neurological disability was associated with a greater likelihood of suspected COVID-19 (ORadj  = 1.45, 1.17-1.84). INTERPRETATIONS: Our study of real-time, patient-reported experience during the COVID-19 pandemic complements physician-reported MS case registries which capture an excess of severe cases. Overall, PwNID seem to have a risk of suspected COVID-19 similar to the reference population.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/epidemiology , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Self Report , Adult , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Sclerosis/diagnosis , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/psychology , Pandemics , Prospective Studies
8.
J Health Serv Res Policy ; 26(3): 189-197, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992317

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the disruptions in care experienced by persons with Multiple Sclerosis in Italy due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the self-reported impact on their health and wellbeing. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was completed by 2722 persons with Multiple Sclerosis, after Italy instituted a national lockdown in response to the pandemic. RESULTS: Persons with Multiple Sclerosis reported that the pandemic caused broad disruptions to usual health and social care services, which impacted on their health and wellbeing. Disruptions in care were consistently associated with negative self-reported impacts on the expected progression of the disease, on out-of-pocket expenditure and on carer's stress. Psychological consequences were associated with interruption to usual psychological support, and concerns about the safety of care delivered in person. CONCLUSIONS: The quality of life of persons with Multiple Sclerosis depends greatly on prompt access to a broad range of health and care services. Negative psychological impacts reported by persons with Multiple Sclerosis with less severe disabilities show that accessible integrated services are crucial for maintenance of their wellbeing. Most persons with Multiple Sclerosis with more severe disability experienced negative impacts on perceived health. Their carers compensating for lack of social input resulted in care overburden. As continuity of care is crucial for persons with Multiple Sclerosis, as well as for persons with chronic conditions in general, strategies must be in place to ensure it is included in future pandemic response plans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Adult , Caregiver Burden/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Disabled Persons/psychology , Female , Financing, Personal , Health Status , Humans , Italy , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , Severity of Illness Index , Social Work/organization & administration , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(21)2020 11 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-918191

ABSTRACT

The confinement forced by COVID-19 can have repercussions on the health of people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. The objective of this study is to analyze the relationships between physical activity, a sense of coherence, resilience and coping among people diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis during the health emergency situation. To achieve this goal, this transversal descriptive study included 84 patients that belonged to multiple sclerosis associations during the period of confinement. Participants filled out the Physical Activity (IPAQ-SF), Sense of Coherence (SOC-13), Resilience Scale (ER-14) and coping (COPE-28) questionnaires. The results showed that the average age was 46.9 and that 67.9% had Relapsing Remittent Multiple Sclerosis diagnosed on average 13.9 years ago. They had a high degree (33.3%) and moderate degree (34.5%) of physical activity, high levels of resilience, while the level of a sense of coherence was average and the most commonly used strategies for coping were active confrontation and religion. Physical activity was not related to the rest of the studied variables, but there were correlations between the other variables. The people with multiple sclerosis who belong to patient associations have remained physically active during the obligatory confinement period and have elevated degrees of resilience and an average sense of coherence, as well as using suitable coping strategies, which is why the social-health resource of belonging to a patient association could be boosting these variables that are beneficial to their health.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Coronavirus Infections , Multiple Sclerosis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Sense of Coherence , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0241103, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890189

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in Wuhan, China, in late 2019 and Covid-19, a disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 became a pandemic in March 2020. As the pandemic still unfolds, uncertainty circles around the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on patients with chronic diseases, including autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). To diminish the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and lessen the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the healthcare of MS patients, it is essential to understand knowledge, attitudes, and various behavioral practices related to Covid-19 among MS patients. Therefore, this study aimed to look at the behavioral practices related to Covid-19 among patients with MS. A total of 176 MS patients diagnosed at least one year before the survey were conveniently sampled online in Saudi Arabia and their data collected using a structured interview questionnaire in electronic Google form. We determined the reliability of the questionnaire by measuring its internal consistency in a pilot sample of 30 participants. Overall, more than 80% of participants had good knowledge and attitudes towards Covid-19. However, this did not correlate well with the impact on healthcare (r = 0.06). Our study revealed that 46% of participants were anxious about taking their medication, and 32% of participants missed their hospital appointments. Furthermore, 15% of the participants had a relapse but did not go to the hospital because of the pandemic, 15.9% stopped their DMTs, and 35.2% missed drug infusions or refills. Our study revealed overall good knowledge and attitudes related to Covid-19 among MS patients. However, the healthcare impact was considerable, as 32% of the participants missed their hospital appointments, and another 15% had a relapse. This highlights the significance of the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the healthcare of patients with MS. Measures to mitigate the effect of the pandemic on healthcare service delivery to patients with MS, such as telemedicine, should be strongly encouraged.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , Anxiety , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Young Adult
11.
Arq Neuropsiquiatr ; 78(9): 570-575, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808491

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study reported on a variety of psychological reactions related to anxiety, sleep quality, depression, fatigue, and quality of life in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), related to the Covid-19 quarantine experience. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the neuropsychiatric effects of the COVID-19 pandemic in MS patients and to analyze the risk factors contributing to psychological stress. METHODS: The study was designed as a prospective, cross-sectional survey study. Multiple assessment tools that are used in neurological practice, including Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 (MSQOL-54) were administered prospectively both during the early and the peak stages of COVID-19 outbreak (ESO and PSO, respectively). The survey forms were designed using SurveyMonkey and the participants were participating in the survey via a web link and QR code. RESULTS: Fifty patients were included in the study. BDI scores, PSQI and FSI measurements, cognitive and social subscale scores and total FIS score, MSQOL-54 measurements, physical and mental subscale scores, and total MSQOL-54 score at PSO were significantly different than those at ESO. The body mass index values of the patients increased significantly at PSO compared to those measured at ESO. CONCLUSIONS: The results provide a basis for the development of psychological interventions that could minimize the prevalence of sleep disorders and depression and could improve patients' quality of life during the outbreak.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/psychology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress, Psychological , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/physiopathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Neurol ; 268(5): 1598-1607, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-722251

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Individuals with pre-existing chronic illness have shown increased anxiety and depression due to COVID-19. Here, we examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on emotional symptomatology and quality of life in individuals with Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (PMS). METHODS: Data were obtained during a randomized clinical trial on rehabilitation taking place at 11 centers in North America and Europe. Participants included 131 individuals with PMS. Study procedures were interrupted in accordance with governmental restrictions as COVID-19 spread. During study closure, a COVID Impact Survey was administered via telephone or email to all participants, along with measures of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, quality of life, and MS symptomatology that were previously administered pre-pandemic. RESULTS: 4% of respondents reported COVID-19 infection. No significant changes were noted in anxiety, quality of life, or the impact of MS symptomatology on daily life from baseline to lockdown. While total HADS-depression scores increased significantly at follow-up, this did not translate into more participants scoring above the HADS threshold for clinically significant depression. No significant relationships were noted between disease duration, processing speed ability or EDSS, and changes in symptoms of depression or anxiety. Most participants reported the impact of the virus on their psychological well-being, with a little impact on financial well-being. The perceived impact of the pandemic on physical and psychological well-being was correlated with the impact of MS symptomatology on daily life, as well as changes in depression. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, little change was noted in symptoms of depression or anxiety or overall quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotions , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , North America/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
J Neurol ; 268(3): 743-750, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680349

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anxiety, depression and reduction of quality of life (QoL) are common in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). Fear of getting sick from COVID-19, government's lockdown and the imposed social distancing might have had an impact on psychological distress and QoL. OBJECTIVES: The aim of our study was to investigate anxiety, depression and QoL changes in pwMS during SARS-CoV-2 outbreak and lockdown in Italy. METHODS: 67 pwMS with a previous (less than 6 months) neuropsychological evaluation before SARS-CoV-2 outbreak (T0) were re-evaluated at the time of the outbreak and lockdown in Italy (T1). They underwent a clinical and neurological evaluation and completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y1), the Beck Depression Inventory second edition (BDI-II), and Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54 (MsQoL-54) at T0 and T1. Benjamini-Hochberg procedure was applied to control the false discovery rate. RESULTS: BDI-II and STAI-Y1 scores did not change between T0 and T1. At T1, MsQoL-54 scores were higher on the satisfaction with sexual life and the social function subscales, and lower on the limitation due to emotional problems subscale. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that evaluated mood and QoL levels before and during the lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic in pwMS. No worsening of anxiety and depression levels was found. Contrariwise some improvements were noted on QoL, the most reliable regarding the sexual satisfaction and the social function.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Satisfaction , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Quality of Life , Quarantine/psychology , Sexuality , Social Behavior
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