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1.
ScientificWorldJournal ; 2021: 9342748, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495720

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recently, an outbreak of a novel human coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has become a world health concern leading to severe respiratory tract infections in humans. Virus transmission occurs through person-to-person contact, respiratory droplets, and contaminated hands or surfaces. Accordingly, we aim at reviewing the literature on all information available about the persistence of coronaviruses, including human and animal coronaviruses, on inanimate surfaces and inactivation strategies with biocides employed for chemical and physical disinfection. METHOD: A comprehensive search was systematically conducted in main databases from 1998 to 2020 to identify various viral disinfectants associated with HCoV and methods for control and prevention of this newly emerged virus. RESULTS: The analysis of 62 studies shows that human coronaviruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus or endemic human coronaviruses (HCoV), canine coronavirus (CCV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) can be efficiently inactivated by physical and chemical disinfectants at different concentrations (70, 80, 85, and 95%) of 2-propanol (70 and 80%) in less than or equal to 60 s and 0.5% hydrogen peroxide or 0.1% sodium hypochlorite within 1 minute. Additionally, glutaraldehyde (0.5-2%), formaldehyde (0.7-1%), and povidone-iodine (0.1-0.75%) could readily inactivate coronaviruses. Moreover, dry heat at 56°C, ultraviolet light dose of 0.2 to 140 J/cm2, and gamma irradiation could effectively inactivate coronavirus. The WHO recommends the use of 0.1% sodium hypochlorite solution or an ethanol-based disinfectant with an ethanol concentration between 62% and 71%. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study can help researchers, policymakers, health decision makers, and people perceive and take the correct measures to control and prevent further transmission of COVID-19. Prevention and decontamination will be the main ways to stop the ongoing outbreak of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Disinfectants/pharmacology , Disinfection/instrumentation , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Inactivation/drug effects , 2-Propanol/pharmacology , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus, Canine/drug effects , Disinfection/methods , Ethanol/pharmacology , Formaldehyde/pharmacology , Gamma Rays , Glutaral/pharmacology , Hot Temperature , Humans , Hydrogen Peroxide/pharmacology , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects , Povidone-Iodine/pharmacology , SARS Virus/drug effects , Sodium Hypochlorite/pharmacology , Transmissible gastroenteritis virus/drug effects , Ultraviolet Rays
2.
J Virol ; 95(22): e0127621, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494956

ABSTRACT

The emergence of life-threatening zoonotic diseases caused by betacoronaviruses, including the ongoing coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, has highlighted the need for developing preclinical models mirroring respiratory and systemic pathophysiological manifestations seen in infected humans. Here, we showed that C57BL/6J wild-type mice intranasally inoculated with the murine betacoronavirus murine hepatitis coronavirus 3 (MHV-3) develop a robust inflammatory response leading to acute lung injuries, including alveolar edema, hemorrhage, and fibrin thrombi. Although such histopathological changes seemed to resolve as the infection advanced, they efficiently impaired respiratory function, as the infected mice displayed restricted lung distention and increased respiratory frequency and ventilation. Following respiratory manifestation, the MHV-3 infection became systemic, and a high virus burden could be detected in multiple organs along with morphological changes. The systemic manifestation of MHV-3 infection was also marked by a sharp drop in the number of circulating platelets and lymphocytes, besides the augmented concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 beta (IL-1ß), IL-6, IL-12, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF), thereby mirroring some clinical features observed in moderate and severe cases of COVID-19. Importantly, both respiratory and systemic changes triggered by MHV-3 infection were greatly prevented by blocking TNF signaling, either via genetic or pharmacologic approaches. In line with this, TNF blockage also diminished the infection-mediated release of proinflammatory cytokines and virus replication of human epithelial lung cells infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Collectively, results show that MHV-3 respiratory infection leads to a large range of clinical manifestations in mice and may constitute an attractive, lower-cost, biosafety level 2 (BSL2) in vivo platform for evaluating the respiratory and multiorgan involvement of betacoronavirus infections. IMPORTANCE Mouse models have long been used as valuable in vivo platforms to investigate the pathogenesis of viral infections and effective countermeasures. The natural resistance of mice to the novel betacoronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19, has launched a race toward the characterization of SARS-CoV-2 infection in other animals (e.g., hamsters, cats, ferrets, bats, and monkeys), as well as adaptation of the mouse model, by modifying either the host or the virus. In the present study, we utilized a natural pathogen of mice, MHV, as a prototype to model betacoronavirus-induced acute lung injure and multiorgan involvement under biosafety level 2 conditions. We showed that C57BL/6J mice intranasally inoculated with MHV-3 develops severe disease, which includes acute lung damage and respiratory distress that precede systemic inflammation and death. Accordingly, the proposed animal model may provide a useful tool for studies regarding betacoronavirus respiratory infection and related diseases.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Lung/pathology , Murine hepatitis virus/pathogenicity , Animals , Cell Line , Containment of Biohazards , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation , Liver/pathology , Liver/virology , Lung/virology , Mice , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects , Murine hepatitis virus/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
3.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(6): e1009644, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278205

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus infection induces the unfolded protein response (UPR), a cellular signalling pathway composed of three branches, triggered by unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) due to high ER load. We have used RNA sequencing and ribosome profiling to investigate holistically the transcriptional and translational response to cellular infection by murine hepatitis virus (MHV), often used as a model for the Betacoronavirus genus to which the recently emerged SARS-CoV-2 also belongs. We found the UPR to be amongst the most significantly up-regulated pathways in response to MHV infection. To confirm and extend these observations, we show experimentally the induction of all three branches of the UPR in both MHV- and SARS-CoV-2-infected cells. Over-expression of the SARS-CoV-2 ORF8 or S proteins alone is itself sufficient to induce the UPR. Remarkably, pharmacological inhibition of the UPR greatly reduced the replication of both MHV and SARS-CoV-2, revealing the importance of this pathway for successful coronavirus replication. This was particularly striking when both IRE1α and ATF6 branches of the UPR were inhibited, reducing SARS-CoV-2 virion release (~1,000-fold). Together, these data highlight the UPR as a promising antiviral target to combat coronavirus infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects , Unfolded Protein Response/drug effects , Activating Transcription Factor 6/metabolism , Animals , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Drug Delivery Systems , Endoribonucleases/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mice , RNA-Seq , Vero Cells , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
4.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 05 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242675

ABSTRACT

There is an urgent need for new approaches to limit the severity of coronavirus infections. Many cells of the immune system express receptors for the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and GABA-receptor (GABA-R) agonists have anti-inflammatory effects. Lung epithelial cells also express GABA-Rs, and GABA-R modulators have been shown to limit acute lung injuries. There is currently, however, no information on whether GABA-R agonists might impact the course of a viral infection. Here, we assessed whether clinically applicable GABA-R agonists could be repurposed for the treatment of a lethal coronavirus (murine hepatitis virus 1, MHV-1) infection in mice. We found that oral GABA administration before, or after the appearance of symptoms, very effectively limited MHV-1-induced pneumonitis, severe illness, and death. GABA treatment also reduced viral load in the lungs, suggesting that GABA-Rs may provide a new druggable target to limit coronavirus replication. Treatment with the GABAA-R-specific agonist homotaurine, but not the GABAB-R-specific agonist baclofen, significantly reduced the severity of pneumonitis and death rates in MHV-1-infected mice, indicating that the therapeutic effects were mediated primarily through GABAA-Rs. Since GABA and homotaurine are safe for human consumption, they are promising candidates to help treat coronavirus infections.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , GABA-A Receptor Agonists/therapeutic use , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Animals , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Mice , Murine hepatitis virus/pathogenicity , Pneumonia/mortality , Pneumonia/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Viral Load/drug effects , Weight Loss/drug effects , gamma-Aminobutyric Acid/therapeutic use
5.
ACS Appl Mater Interfaces ; 13(18): 20995-21006, 2021 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209173

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has been diffusely pandemic around the world, characterized by massive morbidity and mortality. One of the remarkable threats associated with mortality may be the uncontrolled inflammatory processes, which were induced by SARS-CoV-2 in infected patients. As there are no specific drugs, exploiting safe and effective treatment strategies is an instant requirement to dwindle viral damage and relieve extreme inflammation simultaneously. Here, highly biocompatible glycyrrhizic acid (GA) nanoparticles (GANPs) were synthesized based on GA. In vitro investigations revealed that GANPs inhibit the proliferation of the murine coronavirus MHV-A59 and reduce proinflammatory cytokine production caused by MHV-A59 or the N protein of SARS-CoV-2. In an MHV-A59-induced surrogate mouse model of COVID-19, GANPs specifically target areas with severe inflammation, such as the lungs, which appeared to improve the accumulation of GANPs and enhance the effectiveness of the treatment. Further, GANPs also exert antiviral and anti-inflammatory effects, relieving organ damage and conferring a significant survival advantage to infected mice. Such a novel therapeutic agent can be readily manufactured into feasible treatment for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Glycyrrhizic Acid/therapeutic use , Inflammation/drug therapy , Nanoparticles/therapeutic use , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/pharmacology , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Glycyrrhizic Acid/chemistry , Humans , Liver/pathology , Lung/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/pharmacology , RAW 264.7 Cells , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , THP-1 Cells , Viral Load/drug effects , Virus Diseases/pathology , Virus Replication/drug effects
6.
Int J Infect Dis ; 103: 300-304, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009578

ABSTRACT

The emergence and re-emergence of coronaviruses (CoV) continually cause circulating epidemics and pandemics worldwide, such as the on-going outbreak of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The resultant disease, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has rapidly developed into a worldwide pandemic, leading to severe health and economic burdens. Although the recently announced vaccines against COVID-19 has rekindled hope, there is still a major challenge to urgently meet the global need for rapid treatment of the pandemic. Given the urgency of the CoV outbreak, we propose a strategy to screen potential broad-spectrum drugs against CoV in a high-throughput manner, particularly against SARS-CoV-2. Since the essential functional domains of CoV are extensively homologous, the availability of two types of mild CoV, HCoV-OC43 and MHV, should provide a valuable tool for the rapid identification of promising drugs against CoV without the drawbacks of level three biological confinements. The luciferase reporter gene is introduced into HCoV-OC43 and MHV to indicate viral activity, and hence the antiviral efficiency of screened drugs can be quantified by luciferase activity. Compounds with antiviral activity against both HCoV-OC43 and MHV are further evaluated in SARS-CoV-2 after structural optimizations. This system allows large-scale compounds to be screened to search for broad-spectrum drugs against CoV in a high-throughput manner, providing potential alternatives for clinical management of SARS-CoV-2 or other CoV.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , High-Throughput Screening Assays/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Coronavirus OC43, Human/drug effects , Humans , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects
7.
Immunol Lett ; 217: 25-30, 2020 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-888577

ABSTRACT

In a previous work we demonstrated that inhibition of mouse indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by methyltryptophan (MT) exacerbated the pathological actions of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV-A59) infection, suggesting that tryptophan (TRP) catabolism was involved in viral effects. Since there is a second enzyme that dioxygenates TRP, tryptophan-2, 3-dioxygenase (TDO), which is mainly located in liver, we decided to study its role in our model of MHV-infection. Results showed that in vivo TDO inhibition by LM10, a derivative of 3-(2-(pyridyl) ethenyl) indole, resulted in a decrease of anti- MHV Ab titers induced by the virus infection. Besides, a reduction of some alarmin release, i.e, uric acid and high-mobility group box1 protein (HMGB1), was observed. Accordingly, since alarmin liberation was related to the expression of autoantibodies (autoAb) to fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), these autoAb also diminished. Moreover, PCR results indicated that TDO inhibition did not abolish viral replication. Furthermore, histological liver examination did not reveal strong pathologies, whereas mouse survival was hundred percent in control as well as in MHV-infected mice treated with LM10. Data presented in this work indicate that in spite of the various TDO actions already described, specific TDO blockage could also restrain some MHV actions, mainly suppressing autoimmune reactions. Such results should prompt further experiments with various viruses to confirm the possible use of a TDO inhibitor such as LM-10 to treat either viral infections or even autoimmune diseases triggered by a viral infection.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/enzymology , Autoimmunity/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Liver/enzymology , Murine hepatitis virus/immunology , Tryptophan Oxygenase/antagonists & inhibitors , Tryptophan Oxygenase/metabolism , Alarmins/metabolism , Animals , Autoantibodies/drug effects , Autoantibodies/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , HMGB1 Protein/blood , HMGB1 Protein/metabolism , Hydrolases/immunology , Indoles/therapeutic use , Liver/drug effects , Liver/immunology , Liver/pathology , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Murine hepatitis virus/drug effects , Murine hepatitis virus/growth & development , Tryptophan/metabolism , Tryptophan Oxygenase/genetics , Uric Acid/blood , Uric Acid/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/immunology
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