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1.
Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg ; 28(11): 1655-1658, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2111172

ABSTRACT

The pulmonary symptoms secondary to severe acute respiratory syndrome in coronavirus (COVID-19) infections are the most common presentation for the disease; however, it is now known that in a small portion of patients, severe hemorrhagic complications can also be seen. In this report, three cases of elderly women with known COVID-19 infection, developing spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma on anticoagulation therapy, are presented. Three cases presented above emphasize the need to perform a computed tomography examination after a sudden hemodynamic deterioration and a decrease in hemoglobin count in COVID-19 patients in intensive care units (ICUs). Since this clinical deterioration can be caused by spontaneous rectus sheath hematomas (RSH), it must be taken into consideration while examination. If these RSHs rupture into the abdominal cavity, the outcome may be fatal in few hours as represented in two of our cases. Major spontaneous hemorrhage in COVID-19 patients is quite uncommon; therefore, it may cause serious complications as it is rarely taken into consideration. Failure to acknowledge such a risk could significantly worsen the prognosis of the patients especially in ERs and ICUs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Muscular Diseases , Humans , Female , Aged , Rectus Abdominis/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/complications , Hematoma/etiology , Hematoma/complications , Muscular Diseases/complications , Muscular Diseases/therapy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Anticoagulants/adverse effects
2.
Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg ; 28(10): 1468-1474, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081059

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There has been an increased incidence of rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) due to chronic cough attacks and anti-coagulant therapy due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study aims to determine, in which parameters differ before and during the diagnosis of RSH in COVID-19 patients and what may be expected during diagnosis and follow-up. METHODS: Thirty-five patients diagnosed with RSH were evaluated retrospectively between March 2016 and March 2021. The COVID-19 group comprised 11 patients. Various information including patient history and time of discharge/death were retrieved and compared between the experimental groups. RESULTS: The rates of hypotension on admission (p=0.011) and the rates of defense and rebound (p=0.030) were higher in the patients with COVID-19 than in those without. Although there was no difference in terms of bleeding width, there was a greater decrease in the hemoglobin levels (p=0.009) in the COVID-19 patients and the need for erythrocyte suspension (p=0.040) increased significantly in that group. CONCLUSION: The present study constitutes the first evaluation of RSH in COVID-19 patients. The clinical situation is serious due to high rates of hypotension, defense or rebound, and decreases in hemoglobin levels in COVID-19 patients. This makes the clinical management of RSH more difficult, resulting in longer hospitalization. Despite these difficulties, COVID-19 infection does not increase morbidity or mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypotension , Muscular Diseases , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Testing , Follow-Up Studies , Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage , Hematoma/diagnosis , Hematoma/etiology , Hematoma/therapy , Hemoglobins , Humans , Hypotension/complications , Hypotension/drug therapy , Muscular Diseases/complications , Muscular Diseases/drug therapy , Pandemics , Rectus Abdominis , Retrospective Studies
3.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(9)2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010208

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: Consequences due to infection with SARS-CoV-2 virus can have a direct impact on skeletal muscle, due to the fact that both cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue show robust ACE2(angiotensin-converting enzyme 2) expression, suggesting a potential susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection in both types of tissues. From the articles analyzed we concluded that the musculoskeletal damage is firstly produced by the inflammatory effects, cytokine storm and muscle catabolism. However, myopathy, polyneuropathy and therapies such as corticoids were also considered important factors in muscle fatigue and functional incapacity. Pulmonary rehabilitation programs and early mobilization had a highly contribution during the acute phase and post-illness recovery process and helped patients to reduce dyspnea, increase the capacity of physical effort, overcome psychological disorders and improved the quality of their life. Materials and Methods: We have included in this review 33 articles that contain data on muscle damage following SARS-CoV-2 infection. We used the following keywords to search for articles: SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19, muscle weakness, muscle disease, muscle fatigue, neurological disorders. As a search strategy we used PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects and Health Technology Assessment Database to collect the information. We also have chosen the most recent articles published in the last 5 years. Conclusions: Muscular damage, as well as the decrease in the quality of life, are often a consequence of severe SARS-CoV-2 infection through: systemic inflammation, corticotherapy, prolonged bed rest and other unknown factors. Pulmonary rehabilitation programs and early mobilization had a highly contribution during the acute phase and post-illness recovery process and helped patients to reduce dyspnea, increase the capacity of physical effort, overcome psychological disorders and improve the quality of their life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Muscular Diseases , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Dyspnea , Humans , Muscle Fatigue , Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism , Muscular Diseases/complications , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
4.
Neuromuscul Disord ; 32(6): 486-492, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778387

ABSTRACT

Neuromuscular complications in paediatric patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are poorly characterised. However, adult patients with severe COVID-19 reportedly present with frequent neuromuscular complications that mainly include critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP), critical illness myopathy (CIM), and focal neuropathies. We examined the records of all paediatric patients with severe COVID-19 who were mechanically ventilated and experienced neuromuscular complications from our single tertiary centre between March 2020 and August 2021. During this period, 4/36 (11%) patients admitted to the paediatric ICU who were mechanically ventilated experienced neuromuscular complications (one CIM, two focal neuropathies, and one CIP associated with plexopathy). In three of them, the gamma genetic variant of SARS-CoV-2 was identified. At the 4-5 month follow-up, three of our patients exhibited slight clinical improvement. We conclude that paediatric patients with severe COVID-19 may present neuromuscular complications similar to adults (11%), and their medium-term prognosis seems unfavourable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Muscular Diseases , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases , Polyneuropathies , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Child , Critical Illness , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Muscular Diseases/complications , Peripheral Nervous System Diseases/complications , Polyneuropathies/complications , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Rheumatol Int ; 42(5): 905-912, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739303

ABSTRACT

Adult COVID-19 patients can present with acute muscle and/or cardiac involvement. Our study aims to describe the incidence and characteristics of patients with the co-occurrence of COVID-19 myopathy and inflammatory cardiac disease. We retrospectively reviewed all COVID-19 patients admitted to a large tertiary center to assess the co-occurrence of myopathy and inflammatory cardiac disease. We conducted a literature review of prior relevant case reports. There were three COVID-19 patients with concurrent involvement from our center and five cases in the published literature. Overall, mean age was 57.7 ± 16, four were females (50%) and only two patients (25%) had major relevant comorbidities. Muscle involvement included rhabdomyolysis or myositis and cardiac involvement included myocarditis or pericarditis. Most patients (75%) had no respiratory COVID-19 symptoms. Troponin and creatine phosphokinase levels were higher than twofold of the upper limit of normal for all patients. Steroids were used in the treatment of most patients (75%). All patients had a resolution or improvement of their extra-pulmonary involvement while two (25%) deteriorated due to COVID-19 pneumonia. The incidence for this co-occurrence is 0.07% among hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Patients with these rare COVID-19 simultaneous manifestations have distinct features. They are generally younger, present with extra-pulmonary symptoms and do not have severe respiratory compromise. An underdiagnosis causing treatment delay is possible. Further study is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Muscular Diseases , Myocarditis , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Muscular Diseases/complications , Muscular Diseases/epidemiology , Myocarditis/epidemiology , Myocarditis/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Neurol Sci ; 42(6): 2173-2178, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146213

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report clinical and electroneuromyographic (ENMG) characteristics of patients affected by severe COVID-19 infection, evaluated for muscular weakness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ENMGs performed for evaluation of diffuse weakness in patients who could not be discharged from semi-intensive care COVID unit because of difficulties in ventilation weaning were reviewed. Patients with severe COVID-19 infection who had undergone endotracheal intubation and able to co-operate were considered. ENMG protocol was focused on neurophysiological items that excluded or confirmed critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP), myopathy (CIM), or polyneuromyopathy (CIPM). Standardized clinical evaluation was performed using Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score. RESULTS: Eight patients were included in the study. All presented known risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICU-AW), and none of them had history of underlying neuromuscular disorders. ENMG findings were normal in two patients, while only two patients had an altered MRC sum score (< 48). Neuromuscular involvement was diagnosed in 6/8 patients (75%): 2 had CIP, 1 had possible CIM, 1 had CIPM, while 1 patient, with clinically evident weakness but equivocal ENMG findings, was classified as ICU-AW. Finally, 1 patient was diagnosed with acute demyelinating neuropathy. Patients with neuromuscular involvement were those with longer intubation duration and higher levels of IL-6 at admission. CONCLUSION: Neuromuscular complications are frequent in severe COVID-19 and cannot be excluded by MRC sum scores above 48. Standardized ENMG is helpful in guiding diagnosis when clinical evaluation is not reliable or possible. Elevated IL-6 at admission may be a predictor biomarker of ICU-AW in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Muscular Diseases , Polyneuropathies , Critical Illness , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Muscle Weakness/diagnosis , Muscle Weakness/etiology , Muscular Diseases/complications , Muscular Diseases/diagnosis , Polyneuropathies/complications , Polyneuropathies/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2
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