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1.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 104(3): 215-220, 2022 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has substantially impacted the delivery of health care, both through direct care associated with COVID-19 and through more pervasive effects. Our goal was to evaluate whether the number of orthopaedic consultations for firearm injuries differed during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic compared with the same period in prior years. We hypothesized that the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic, compared with the same period in prior years, would have a higher number of orthopaedic consultations for firearm injuries and a lower rate of outpatient follow-up after consultations. METHODS: A prospectively collected database of orthopaedic trauma consultations at a level-I trauma center was queried for firearm injuries. We compared the number of orthopaedic consultations for firearm injury during the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic (March 23, 2020, to September 30, 2020, referred to as the pandemic group) with identical dates from 2017 to 2019 (referred to as the pre-pandemic group). Outpatient follow-up rates, ZIP codes (and associated Area Deprivation Index), and demographic data were compared between the pandemic group and the pre-pandemic group. RESULTS: During the entire study period, 552 orthopaedic consultations for firearm injuries were identified. There was a 63% increase in the daily mean number of firearm injury consultations in the pandemic group, to 1.01, compared with the pre-pandemic group, 0.62 (p < 0.001). There was no difference in the rate of outpatient follow-up: 66% for the pandemic group and 72% for the pre-pandemic group. There was no difference in the percentage of patients from the most socially deprived decile: 45.3% in the pandemic group and 49.5% in the pre-pandemic group. Patients presenting during the pandemic were more often uninsured (75.8%) relative to the pre-pandemic group (67.9%), with a lack of health insurance significantly decreasing the likelihood of outpatient follow-up (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the same period in prior years, there was a significant increase in the number of orthopaedic consultations for firearm injuries during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic in our community. Patient race, socioeconomic status, and outpatient follow-up were similar between the pandemic group and the pre-pandemic group. There was a higher proportion of uninsured patients within the pandemic group and a lower rate of follow-up among those without insurance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Firearms , Musculoskeletal System/injuries , Wounds, Gunshot/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Databases, Factual , Epidemics , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Young Adult
2.
Sports Health ; 14(3): 372-376, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571719

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) affects multiple organ systems. Whether and how COVID-19 affects the musculoskeletal system remains unknown. We aim to assess the association between COVID-19 and risk of injury. HYPOTHESIS: Runners who report having COVID-19 also report a higher incidence of injury. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 4. METHODS: An electronic survey was distributed from July through September 2020, by New York Road Runners, ASICS North America, race medical directors, and through social media. Inclusion criteria were runners 18 years or older who had participated in ≥1 race (running or triathlon) in 2019. RESULTS: A total of 1947 runners participated and met inclusion criteria. Average age was 45.0 (SD, 12.2) years and 56.5% were women. A total of 123 (6.3%) runners self-reported having COVID-19; 100 (81%) reported their diagnosis was from a laboratory test (polymerase chain reaction or antibody) and 23 reported being diagnosed by a medical professional without confirmatory laboratory testing. Since March 2020, 427 (21.9%) reported an injury that prevented running for at least 1 week, including 38 of 123 (30.9%) who self-reported having COVID-19 and 389 of 1435 (21.3%) who did not report having COVID-19 (P = 0.01). After adjusting for age, sex, the number of races in 2019, and running patterns before March 2020, runners who self-reported a diagnosis of COVID-19 had a higher incidence of injury compared with those who did not (odds ratio, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.11-2.48; P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Injuries were more often self-reported by runners with laboratory-confirmed or clinically diagnosed COVID-19 compared with those who did not report COVID-19. Given the limitations of the study, any direct role of COVID-19 in the pathophysiology of injuries among runners remains unclear. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Direct and indirect musculoskeletal sequelae of COVID-19 should be further investigated, including the risk of exercise- and sports-related injury after COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Athletic Injuries , COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal System , Athletic Injuries/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal System/injuries
3.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 74: 264-270, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379039

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vascular trauma comprises a diagnostic and surgical challenge. Aim of this study was to present the vascular traumas treated in our Tertiary Hospital during the last 5 years. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the surgical records of our vascular department and documented the site and type of vascular injuries of the extremities along with the concurrence of musculoskeletal injuries. The type and outcome of surgical interventions were also recorded. RESULTS: Fifty-eight cases of vascular trauma were recorded (39 in the upper and 19 in the lower extremities). Overall, iatrogenic traumas accounted for 41.3% of cases. The arterial injuries of the upper limb were blunt and penetrating in 27% and 67%, respectively. The most affected artery in the upper limb was the radial artery (37.8%), followed by the ulnar artery (27%) and the brachial artery (24.3%). Orthopedic injuries were recorded in 19% of patients. Management involved simple revascularization, bypass operations, patch arterioplasty and endovascular management in 48.7%, 33.3%, 5.1%, and 5.1%, respectively. The most affected site in the lower extremity was the common femoral artery (36.8%) followed by the popliteal artery (21%). Bone fractures were reported in 5 cases (26.3%). The surgical management involved bypass, simple revascularization, patch arterioplasty in 42.1%, 26.3%, and 21%, respectively. Endovascular management was performed in 10.5%. CONCLUSIONS: A considerable percentage of iatrogenic vascular injuries was recorded, affecting both the upper and lower limbs. Despite the trend toward centralization of vascular services, a basic service of vascular surgery should be available in most sites to ensure that patients with vascular injuries receive fast and appropriate care.


Subject(s)
Extremities/blood supply , Iatrogenic Disease , Vascular Surgical Procedures , Vascular System Injuries/surgery , Wounds, Nonpenetrating/surgery , Wounds, Penetrating/surgery , Adult , Aged , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Female , Greece , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal System/injuries , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Vascular System Injuries/diagnostic imaging , Vascular System Injuries/etiology , Wounds, Nonpenetrating/diagnostic imaging , Wounds, Nonpenetrating/etiology , Wounds, Penetrating/diagnostic imaging , Wounds, Penetrating/etiology
4.
Br J Sports Med ; 55(15): 843-850, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315801

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the incidence rate, severity, burden and aetiology of medical attention and time-loss injuries across five consecutive seasons at a professional ballet company. METHODS: Medical attention injuries, time-loss injuries and dance exposure hours of 123 professional ballet dancers (women: n=66, age: 28.0±8.3 years; men: n=57, age: 27.9±8.5 years) were prospectively recorded between the 2015/2016 and 2019/2020 seasons. RESULTS: The incidence rate (per 1000 hours) of medical attention injury was 3.9 (95% CI 3.3 to 4.4) for women and 3.1 (95% CI 2.6 to 3.5) for men. The incidence rate (per 1000 hours) of time-loss injury was 1.2 (95% CI 1.0 to 1.5) for women and 1.1 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.3) for men. First Soloists and Principals experienced between 2.0-2.2 additional medical attention injuries per 1000 hours and 0.9-1.1 additional time-loss injuries per 1000 hours compared with Apprentices (p≤0.025). Further, intraseason differences were observed in medical attention, but not time-loss, injury incidence rates with the highest incidence rates in early (August and September) and late (June) season months. Thirty-five per cent of time-loss injuries resulted in over 28 days of modified dance training. A greater percentage of time-loss injuries were classified as overuse (women: 50%; men: 51%) compared with traumatic (women: 40%; men: 41%). CONCLUSION: This is the first study to report the incidence rate of medical attention and time-loss injuries in professional ballet dancers. Incidence rates differed across company ranks and months, which may inform targeted injury prevention strategies.


Subject(s)
Absenteeism , Dancing/injuries , Occupational Injuries/epidemiology , Adult , Confidence Intervals , Dancing/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Incidence , Injury Severity Score , Male , Musculoskeletal System/injuries , Occupational Injuries/classification , Occupational Injuries/therapy , Prospective Studies , Seasons , Sex Distribution , Time Factors
5.
Acta Orthop ; 91(5): 556-561, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153041

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose - The COVID-19 pandemic has been recognized as an unprecedented global health crisis. This is the first observational study to evaluate its impact on the orthopedic workload in a London level 1 trauma center (i.e., a major trauma center [MTC]) before (2019) and during (2020) the "golden month" post-COVID-19 lockdown.Patients and methods - We performed a longitudinal observational prevalence study of both acute orthopedic trauma referrals, operative and anesthetic casemix for the first "golden" month from March 17, 2020. We compared the data with the same period in 2019. Statistical analyses included median (median absolute deviation), risk and odds ratios, as well as Fisher's exact test to calculate the statistical significance, set at p ≤ 0.05.Results - Acute trauma referrals in the post-COVID period were almost halved compared with 2019, with similar distribution between pediatric and adult patients, requiring a significant 19% more admissions (RR 1.3, OR 2.6, p = 0.003). Hip fractures and polytrauma cases accounted for an additional 11% of the modal number of injuries in 2020, but with 19% reduction in isolated limb injuries that were modal in 2019. Total operative cases fell by a third during the COVID-19 outbreak. There was a decrease of 14% (RR 0.85, OR 0.20, p = 0.006) in aerosol-generating anesthetic techniques used.Interpretation - The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has led to a decline in the number of acute trauma referrals, admissions (but increased risk and odds ratio), operations, and aerosolizing anesthetic procedures since implementing social distancing and lockdown measures during the "golden month."


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal System/injuries , Workload/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , London , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Young Adult
6.
Isr Med Assoc J ; 23(2): 71-75, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085835

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) crisis has affected how hospitals work and has had an effect on orthopedic surgery. OBJECTIVES: To compare patient management and low-energy and high-energy trauma treatment at two orthopedic trauma units during the COVID-19 crisis and to clarify resource demands and preparedness in orthopedic clinics during the state of emergency caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted at two orthopedic trauma units from 14 March 2019 to 14 April 2019 and from 14 March 2020 to 14 April 2020. RESULTS: The proportion of patients admitted in the multi-trauma orthopedic unit decreased by one-third, the mean time interval from admission to surgery significantly decreased, and the number of surgeries and mean length of stay in hospital decreased in 2020 compared to the same test period in 2019. In the orthopedic trauma unit, the number of patients and surgeries also decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlights changes in orthopedic injury characteristics in two orthopedic units during the COVID-19 crisis in Latvia and compares these changes to data from the same time period one year earlier.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Latvia , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal System/injuries , Musculoskeletal System/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors , Young Adult
7.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 22442, 2020 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1003320

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to the worldwide implementation of unprecedented public protection measures. On the 17th of March, the French government announced a lockdown of the population for 8 weeks. This monocentric study assessed the impact of this lockdown on the musculoskeletal injuries treated at the emergency department as well as the surgical indications. We carried out a retrospective study in the Emergency Department and the Surgery Department of Nantes University Hospital from 18 February to 11 May 2020. We collected data pertaining to the demographics, the mechanism, the type, the severity, and inter-hospital transfer for musculoskeletal injuries from our institution. We compared the 4-week pre-lockdown period and the 8-week lockdown period divided into two 4-week periods: early lockdown and late lockdown. There was a 52.1% decrease in musculoskeletal injuries among patients presenting to the Emergency Department between the pre-lockdown and the lockdown period (weekly incidence: 415.3 ± 44.2 vs. 198.5 ± 46.0, respectively, p < .001). The number of patients with surgical indications decreased by 33.4% (weekly incidence: 44.3 ± 3.8 vs. 28.5 ± 10.2, p = .048). The policy for inter-hospital transfers to private entities resulted in 64 transfers (29.4%) during the lockdown period. There was an increase in the incidence of surgical high severity trauma (Injury Severity Score > 16) between the pre-lockdown and the early lockdown period (2 (1.1%) vs. 7 (7.2%), respectively, p = .010) as well as between the pre-lockdown and the late lockdown period (2 (1.1%) vs. 10 (8.3%), respectively, p = .004). We observed a significant increase in the weekly emergency department patient admissions between the early and the late lockdown period (161.5 ± 22.9, 235.5 ± 27.7, respectively, p = .028). A pronounced decrease in the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries was observed secondary to the lockdown measures, with emergency department patient admissions being halved and surgical indications being reduced by a third. The increase in musculoskeletal injuries during the late confinement period and the higher incidence of severe trauma highlights the importance of maintaining a functional trauma center organization with an inter-hospital transfer policy in case of a COVID-19s wave lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Musculoskeletal Diseases/surgery , Musculoskeletal System/injuries , Aged , Communicable Disease Control/legislation & jurisprudence , Female , Humans , Male , Musculoskeletal System/surgery , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data
8.
ANZ J Surg ; 91(1-2): 68-72, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-852209

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected communities worldwide. This study examines the impact that public health measures to control viral spread have had on orthopaedic trauma presenting to an Australian level 1 trauma centre. We hypothesized that the volume of orthopaedic trauma in the period of social distancing would decrease, and the mechanisms of injury differ, compared to pre-pandemic times. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients requiring emergency orthopaedic surgery between 16 March and 21 April 2020 (the period after social distancing and lockdown commenced), and compared it to the group of patients from the same period in 2019. We collected demographic data, as well as injury type, anatomical location, mechanism of injury and surgical logistics. RESULTS: During the COVID-19 period, total emergency operations performed decreased by 15.6% compared to the same period in 2019. Orthopaedic admissions decreased by 30.8%. Demographics of the groups were unchanged. Anaesthetic time decreased, but total time spent in the operating theatre was unchanged. Road trauma comprised a similar proportion of cases overall; however, cycling-related accidents increased significantly, making up 11% of presentations during COVID-19. Sporting injuries, work-related injuries and multi-traumas reduced during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The impact of COVID-19-related lockdown measures and social distancing on orthopaedic trauma in Australia has been an overall decrease in volume of cases, combined with significant changes in the mechanisms of injury necessitating surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Musculoskeletal System/injuries , Orthopedic Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Physical Distancing , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Adult , Australia , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , Wounds and Injuries/surgery
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