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1.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6588-6594, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562422

ABSTRACT

This study is aimed to identify the adverse effects associated with three types of coronavirus disease 2019 vaccines. Approximately 1736 individuals agreed to participate in this study. The participants involved in the study were individuals who had received the first dose or full course (two doses) of the vaccine at least 30 days before the survey. A direct and interactive web-based system interview with a paper and electronic version of the questionnaire was used for all participants. A total of 1736 randomized individuals were identified. The reactogenicity of the vaccines including pain, redness, urticaria, and swelling at the site of the injection was reported in 34.56% of the participants. Local site reaction was reported in more individuals who had Pfizer and AstraZeneca vaccines than those who received the Sinopharm vaccine. The systemic events were more common with AstraZeneca and Pfizer vaccines, symptoms reported were fatigue, body pain, headache, muscle pain, fever, and gastrointestinal side effects. There were no correlations between age or gender, and the duration of the adverse effects for the three vaccines. Swelling and severe allergic reaction of the eyelids, severe hypotension, generalized body aches, shortness of breath, weakness and numbness on the injected arm, acute hyperglycemia, severe chest pain, and fever more than 39°C were among the unusual signs and symptoms reported by the participants. Pfizer, AstraZeneca, and Sinopharm vaccines were found to be safe and Sinopharm vaccine showed a lower prevalence of adverse effects compared with the other vaccines. The duration and severity of adverse effects were not affected by age or gender. Unusual side effects should be closely monitored to establish determine they are linked to the immunization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Headache/etiology , Humans , Injection Site Reaction/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Pain/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
2.
Drug Discov Ther ; 15(5): 254-260, 2021 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542928

ABSTRACT

Post COVID-19 sequelae are a constellation of symptoms often reported after recovering from COVID-19. There is a need to better understand the clinical spectrum and long-term course of this clinical entity. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical features and risk factors of post COVID-19 sequelae in the North Indian population. This prospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary healthcare centre in Northern India between October 2020 and February 2021. Patients aged >18 years with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were recruited after at least two weeks of diagnosis, and details were captured. A total of 1234 patients were recruited and followed up for a median duration of 91 days (IQR: 45-181 days). Among them, 495 (40.1%) had persistent symptoms post-discharge or recovery. In 223 (18.1%) patients, the symptoms resolved within four weeks; 150 (12.1%) patients had symptoms till 12 weeks, and 122 (9.9%) patients had symptoms beyond 12 weeks of diagnosis/symptom-onset of COVID-19. Most common symptoms included myalgia (10.9%), fatigue (5.5%), shortness of breath (6.1%), cough (2.1%), insomnia (1.4%), mood disturbances (0.48%) and anxiety (0.6%). Patients who were hospitalized were more likely to report fatigue as a feature of long COVID. Hypothyroidism (OR: 4.13, 95% CI: 2.2-7.6, p-value < 0.001) and hypoxia (SpO2 ≤ 93%) (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1-2.4, p-value 0.012) were identified as risk factors for long COVID sequelae. In conclusion, long COVID symptoms were common (22%), and 9.9% had the post COVID-19 syndrome. Myalgias, fatigue and dyspnoea were common symptoms. Patients with hypothyroidism and hypoxia during acute illness were at higher risk of long COVID.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/epidemiology , Myalgia/etiology , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Young Adult
3.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6566-6574, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1530179

ABSTRACT

Post recovery manifestations have become another concern in patients who have recovered from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Numerous reports have shown that COVID-19 has a variety of long-term effects on almost all systems including respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, neurological, psychiatric, and dermatological systems. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of the post-COVID syndrome among COVID-19 survivors and to determine the factors associated with persistent symptoms. This prospective study enrolled in patients with COVID-19 followed in hospital or outpatient clinics in Ankara City Hospital. We performed a special questionnaire to inquire about the presence of persistent symptoms beyond 12 weeks from the first diagnosis. Demographic data, comorbid diseases, characteristics of acute COVID-19, presence of persistent symptoms by systems, and knowledge about outpatient clinic visits after recovery were assessed. Of a total of 1007 participants, 39.0% had at least one comorbidity, and 47.5% had persistent symptoms. Fatigue/easy fatigability, myalgia, and loss of weight were the most frequent persistent symptoms (overall 29.3%) followed by respiratory symptoms (25.4%). A total of 235 participants had visited outpatient clinics due to several reasons during the post-COVID-19 period, and 17 of them were hospitalized. Severe acute COVID-19, hospitalization, and presence of comorbidity were independent factors for the development of persistent symptoms. Fully understanding the spectrum of the post-COVID syndrome is essential for appropriate management of all its long-term effects. Our study once again underlined the fact that the prevalence of post-COVID syndrome is higher than expected and concerns many systems, and a multidisciplinary follow-up should be provided to COVID-19 survivors in the post recovery period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Weight Loss , Young Adult
4.
Pain ; 162(12): 2832-2840, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522382

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: This study investigated the association between COVID-related myalgia experienced by patients at hospital admission and the presence of post-COVID symptoms. A case-control study including patients hospitalised due to COVID-19 between February 20 and May 31, 2020, was conducted. Patients reporting myalgia and patients without myalgia at hospital admission were scheduled for a telephone interview 7 months after hospital discharge. Hospitalisation and clinical data were collected from medical records. A list of post-COVID symptoms with attention to musculoskeletal pain was evaluated. Anxiety and depressive symptoms, and sleep quality were likewise assessed. From a total of 1200 hospitalised patients with COVID-19, 369 with and 369 without myalgia at hospital admission were assessed 7.2 months (SD 0.6) after hospital discharge. A greater proportion (P = 0.03) of patients with myalgia at hospital admission (20%) showed ≥3 post-COVID symptoms when compared with individuals without myalgia (13%). A higher proportion of patients presenting myalgia (odds Rratio 1.41, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.90) exhibited musculoskeletal post-COVID pain when compared to those without myalgia. The prevalence of musculoskeletal post-COVID pain in the total sample was 38%. Fifty percent of individuals with preexisting musculoskeletal pain experienced a worsening of their symptoms after COVID-19. No differences in fatigue, dyspnoea, anxiety/depressive levels, or sleep quality were observed between myalgia and nonmyalgia groups. The presence of myalgia at hospital admission was associated with preexisting history of musculoskeletal pain (OR 1.62, 95% confidence interval 1.10-2.40). In conclusion, myalgia at the acute phase was associated with musculoskeletal pain as long-term post-COVID sequelae. In addition, half of the patients with preexisting pain conditions experienced a persistent exacerbation of their previous syndromes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Pain , Case-Control Studies , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Musculoskeletal Pain/epidemiology , Myalgia/epidemiology , Myalgia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Headache ; 60(10): 2389-2405, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455545

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this experimental study, we aimed to determine whether guided music listening (GML) - a music intervention based on models of mood mediation and attention modulation - modulates masticatory muscle activity and awake bruxism in subjects with chronic painful muscular temporomandibular disorders (TMD myalgia, mTMD), a condition causing a significant burden to patients, their families, and healthcare systems. BACKGROUND: Awake bruxism - a stress behavior characterized by clenching of the teeth - is a strong contributor to chronic mTMD. GML modulates psychological stress and motor responses and could thus reduce muscle activity in chronic musculoskeletal conditions, including mTMD. METHODS: We recorded the electromyographic (EMG) activity in the right masseter of 14 women with chronic (>6 months) mTMD (median [IQR] = 39.5.3 [24.3] years) and 15 pain-free women (median [IQR] = 30.0 [3.5] years) during a GML session, including 3 music (stressful, relaxing, and participants' favorite music) and a no-music (pink noise) control blocks, each lasting 15 minutes. We measured the motor effort of the right masseter relative to the participants' maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), the muscular effort to maintain mandibular posture (EMGposture ), and to produce spontaneous awake bruxism episodes (EMGbruxism ), and the duration and frequency of spontaneous awake bruxism episodes. We tested between-group and within-group (between blocks) differences, as well as the effect of the interaction group by experimental block on these outcome measures. RESULTS: In both groups, EMGposture was significantly affected by the interaction group by experimental block (P < .001). Compared to pink noise [mean (95% CI); mTMD: 2.2 (1.6-2.8) %MVC; Controls: 1.1 (0.5-1.7) %MVC], EMGposture increased during the stressful music block [contrast estimate (95% CI); mTMD: +0.8 (0.7-0.8) %MVC; Controls: +0.3 (0.3-0.4) %MVC; both P < .001], and decreased during the relaxing [mTMD: -0.4 (-0.5 to -0.4) %MVC; Controls: -0.3 (-0.4 to -0.3) %MVC; both P < .001] and favorite [mTMD: -0.5 (-0.6 to -0.5) %MVC; Controls: -0.5 (-0.5 to -0.4) %MVC; both P < .001] music blocks. EMGposture was greater in mTMD individuals than controls during the favorite music [contrast estimate (95% CI): +1.1 (0.2-1.9) %MVC; P = .019] and the pink noise [+1.1 (0.2-2.0) %MVC; P = .014] blocks. EMGbruxism was significantly affected by the interaction group by experimental block (P < .001). In mTMD participants, compared to the pink noise block [mean (95% CI); 23.8 (16.0-31.6) %MVC], EMGbruxism increased during the stressful music block [contrast estimate (95% CI); +10.2 (8.6-11.8) %MVC], and decreased during the relaxing [-6.2 (-8.1 to -4.3) %MVC; P < .001] and favorite [-10.2 (-12.2 to -9.1) %MVC; P < .001] music blocks. These effects were not observed in the control group [mean (95% CI); pink noise: 19.3 (10.9-27.6); stressful: 21.2 (12.9-29.4) %MVC; relaxing: 21.6 (13.3-29.9) %MVC; favorite: 24.2 (15.8-32.7) %MVC; all P > .05]. EMGbruxism was significantly greater in mTMD participants than controls during the stressful music block [contrast estimate (95% CI): +12.9 (1.6-24.2) %MVC; P = .026). GML did not affect the duration or the frequency of awake bruxism in either group (median [IQR], mTMD: 23.5 [96.7] s, range 1-1300 seconds; Controls: 5.5 [22.5], range 0-246 seconds; P = .108). The frequency of awake bruxism episodes was greater in the mTMD group compared to controls only during the pink noise block (median [IQR], mTMD: 5 [15.3] episodes, range 0-62 episodes; Controls: 1 [3] episode, range 0-27 episodes; P = .046). No significant between-group differences were found in either the overall time spent engaging in awake bruxism (median [IQR], mTMD: 23.5 [96.7] s, range 1-1300 seconds; Controls: 5.5 [22.5], range 0-246 seconds; P = .108), or during each block (all P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: In subjects with chronic mTMD, relaxing music and the individual's favorite music decreased the muscular effort during spontaneous awake bruxism episodes by 26% and 44% (relative changes), respectively. In contrast, stressful music increases it by about 43%. Because of its positive effects on awake bruxism, GML with selected music could be a promising and non-invasive component of a multimodal approach for the management of chronic mTMD.


Subject(s)
Bruxism , Chronic Pain , Music Therapy , Music , Myalgia , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Adult , Bruxism/complications , Bruxism/physiopathology , Bruxism/psychology , Bruxism/therapy , Chronic Pain/etiology , Chronic Pain/physiopathology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Electromyography , Female , Humans , Masseter Muscle/physiopathology , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Myalgia/psychology , Myalgia/therapy , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/therapy
7.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2127403, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441917

ABSTRACT

Importance: The long-term health outcomes and symptom burden of COVID-19 remain largely unclear. Objective: To evaluate health outcomes of COVID-19 survivors 1 year after hospital discharge and to identify associated risk factors. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective, multicenter cohort study was conducted at 2 designated hospitals, Huoshenshan Hospital and Taikang Tongji Hospital, both in Wuhan, China. All adult patients with COVID-19 discharged between February 12 and April 10, 2020, were screened for eligibility. Of a consecutive sample of 3988 discharged patients, 1555 were excluded (796 declined to participate and 759 were unable to be contacted) and the remaining 2433 patients were enrolled. All patients were interviewed via telephone from March 1 to March 20, 2021. Statistical analysis was performed from March 28 to April 18, 2021. Exposures: COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: All patients participated in telephone interviews using a series of questionnaires for evaluation of symptoms, along with a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment test (CAT). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate risk factors for fatigue, dyspnea, symptom burden, or higher CAT scores. Results: Of 2433 patients at 1-year follow-up, 1205 (49.5%) were men and 680 (27.9%) were categorized into the severe disease group as defined by the World Health Organization guideline; the median (IQR) age was 60.0 (49.0-68.0) years. In total, 1095 patients (45.0%) reported at least 1 symptom. The most common symptoms included fatigue, sweating, chest tightness, anxiety, and myalgia. Older age (odds ratio [OR], 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.02; P < .001), female sex (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.06-1.52; P = .008), and severe disease during hospital stay (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.18-1.74; P < .001) were associated with higher risks of fatigue. Older age (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.03; P < .001) and severe disease (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.14-1.99; P = .004) were associated with higher risks of having at least 3 symptoms. The median (IQR) CAT score was 2 (0-4), and a total of 161 patients (6.6%) had a CAT score of at least 10. Severe disease (OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.31-2.58; P < .001) and coexisting cerebrovascular diseases (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.07-3.54; P = .03) were independent risk factors for CAT scores of at least 10. Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that patients with COVID-19 with severe disease during hospitalization had more postinfection symptoms and higher CAT scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitals , Patient Discharge , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/etiology , Severity of Illness Index , Survivors , Aged , Anxiety/etiology , China , Cities , Dyspnea/etiology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
PLoS Med ; 18(9): e1003777, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Rapid detection, isolation, and contact tracing of community COVID-19 cases are essential measures to limit the community spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We aimed to identify a parsimonious set of symptoms that jointly predict COVID-19 and investigated whether predictive symptoms differ between the B.1.1.7 (Alpha) lineage (predominating as of April 2021 in the US, UK, and elsewhere) and wild type. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We obtained throat and nose swabs with valid SARS-CoV-2 PCR test results from 1,147,370 volunteers aged 5 years and above (6,450 positive cases) in the REal-time Assessment of Community Transmission-1 (REACT-1) study. This study involved repeated community-based random surveys of prevalence in England (study rounds 2 to 8, June 2020 to January 2021, response rates 22%-27%). Participants were asked about symptoms occurring in the week prior to testing. Viral genome sequencing was carried out for PCR-positive samples with N-gene cycle threshold value < 34 (N = 1,079) in round 8 (January 2021). In univariate analysis, all 26 surveyed symptoms were associated with PCR positivity compared with non-symptomatic people. Stability selection (1,000 penalized logistic regression models with 50% subsampling) among people reporting at least 1 symptom identified 7 symptoms as jointly and positively predictive of PCR positivity in rounds 2-7 (June to December 2020): loss or change of sense of smell, loss or change of sense of taste, fever, new persistent cough, chills, appetite loss, and muscle aches. The resulting model (rounds 2-7) predicted PCR positivity in round 8 with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.77. The same 7 symptoms were selected as jointly predictive of B.1.1.7 infection in round 8, although when comparing B.1.1.7 with wild type, new persistent cough and sore throat were more predictive of B.1.1.7 infection while loss or change of sense of smell was more predictive of the wild type. The main limitations of our study are (i) potential participation bias despite random sampling of named individuals from the National Health Service register and weighting designed to achieve a representative sample of the population of England and (ii) the necessary reliance on self-reported symptoms, which may be prone to recall bias and may therefore lead to biased estimates of symptom prevalence in England. CONCLUSIONS: Where testing capacity is limited, it is important to use tests in the most efficient way possible. We identified a set of 7 symptoms that, when considered together, maximize detection of COVID-19 in the community, including infection with the B.1.1.7 lineage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Models, Biological , Ageusia/diagnosis , Ageusia/etiology , Ageusia/virology , Anosmia/diagnosis , Anosmia/etiology , Anosmia/virology , Appetite , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/virology , Chills/diagnosis , Chills/etiology , Chills/virology , Communicable Disease Control , Cough/diagnosis , Cough/etiology , Cough/virology , England , False Positive Reactions , Female , Fever/diagnosis , Fever/etiology , Fever/virology , Humans , Male , Mass Screening , Myalgia/diagnosis , Myalgia/etiology , Myalgia/virology , Pharyngitis/diagnosis , Pharyngitis/etiology , Pharyngitis/virology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , State Medicine
9.
J Microbiol ; 59(10): 941-948, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432635

ABSTRACT

Several follow-up studies have found that COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) patients had persistent symptoms after discharge. Gut microbiota play an important role in human health and immune responses. Therefore, this study investigated the gut microbiota of recovered COVID-19 patients and the correlations between gut microbiota and persistent symptoms after discharge. Stool samples were collected from 15 recovered healthcare workers (HCWs) with COVID-19 at three months after discharge, in addition, stool samples were collected from 14 healthy controls (HCs) to perform 16S rRNA gene sequencing between May and July 2020. Compared with HCs, recovered HCWs had reduced bacterial diversity at three months after discharge, with a significantly higher relative abundance of opportunistic pathogens, and a significantly lower relative abundance of beneficial bacteria. In addition, Escherichia unclassified was positively correlated with persistent symptoms at three months after discharge, including fatigue (r = 0.567, p = 0.028), chest tightness after activity (r = 0.687, p = 0.005), and myalgia (r = 0.523, p = 0.045). Intestinibacter bartlettii was positively correlated with anorexia (r = 0.629, p = 0.012) and fatigue (r = 0.545, p = 0.036). However, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii was negatively correlated with chest tightness after activity (r = -0.591, p = 0.02), and Intestinimonas butyriciproducens was negatively correlated with cough (r = -0.635, p = 0.011). In conclusion, the gut microbiota of recovered HCWs with COVID-19 at three months after discharge was different from that of HCs, and altered gut microbiota was correlated with persistent symptoms after discharge, highlighting that gut microbiota may play an important role in the recovery of patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/isolation & purification , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/microbiology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Adult , Bacteria/classification , Bacteria/genetics , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/microbiology , Feces/microbiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Myalgia/microbiology , Patient Discharge , Phylogeny , Survivors/statistics & numerical data
10.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6588-6594, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1400909

ABSTRACT

This study is aimed to identify the adverse effects associated with three types of coronavirus disease 2019 vaccines. Approximately 1736 individuals agreed to participate in this study. The participants involved in the study were individuals who had received the first dose or full course (two doses) of the vaccine at least 30 days before the survey. A direct and interactive web-based system interview with a paper and electronic version of the questionnaire was used for all participants. A total of 1736 randomized individuals were identified. The reactogenicity of the vaccines including pain, redness, urticaria, and swelling at the site of the injection was reported in 34.56% of the participants. Local site reaction was reported in more individuals who had Pfizer and AstraZeneca vaccines than those who received the Sinopharm vaccine. The systemic events were more common with AstraZeneca and Pfizer vaccines, symptoms reported were fatigue, body pain, headache, muscle pain, fever, and gastrointestinal side effects. There were no correlations between age or gender, and the duration of the adverse effects for the three vaccines. Swelling and severe allergic reaction of the eyelids, severe hypotension, generalized body aches, shortness of breath, weakness and numbness on the injected arm, acute hyperglycemia, severe chest pain, and fever more than 39°C were among the unusual signs and symptoms reported by the participants. Pfizer, AstraZeneca, and Sinopharm vaccines were found to be safe and Sinopharm vaccine showed a lower prevalence of adverse effects compared with the other vaccines. The duration and severity of adverse effects were not affected by age or gender. Unusual side effects should be closely monitored to establish determine they are linked to the immunization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Headache/etiology , Humans , Injection Site Reaction/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Pain/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(34): e245, 2021 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379958

ABSTRACT

Since February 26, 2021, when vaccination against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) began in South Korea, patients who visited the Korea University Guro Hospital with suspected adverse events after COVID-19 vaccination were monitored actively with interest. We encountered five unusual cases of polyarthralgia and myalgia syndrome in patients who received the ChAdOx1 nCOV-19 (AstraZeneca) vaccine. The patients (median age 67 years) were not previously diagnosed with arthropathy and rheumatologic diseases. They developed fever, myalgia, joint pain, and swelling three to seven days after vaccination. The symptoms persisted for up to 47 days despite antipyretic treatment. Arthralgia occurred in multiple joints, including small and large joints. A whole-body Technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate bone scan revealed unusual uptakes in the affected joints. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with or without prednisolone relieved the symptoms of all patients. Further monitoring is required to clarify the long-term prognosis of this syndrome.


Subject(s)
Arthralgia/etiology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Myalgia/etiology , Vaccination/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , Arthralgia/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Joints/diagnostic imaging , Joints/pathology , Myalgia/drug therapy , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
14.
Pharmacol Res ; 161: 105126, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the global epidemic of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), China has made progress in the prevention and control of the epidemic, and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has played a key role in dealing with the disease's effects on the respiratory system. This randomized controlled clinical trial evaluated the clinical efficacy and prognosis of Huoxiang Zhengqi dropping pills and Lianhua Qingwen granules in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A total of 283 patients participated in this clinical trial, and participants were randomly assigned to receive either 1) Huoxiang Zhengqi dropping pills and Lianhua Qingwen granules or 2) Linahua granules, both combined with western medicine, or 3) western medicine alone for 14 days. At the end of the trial, the improvement and resolution rates of clinical symptoms and the rate of patients who progressed to severe disease status were evaluated. RESULTS: After 14 days of treatment, there was no significant difference in the improvement rate of clinical symptoms among the three groups (P > 0.05). Huoxiang Zhengqi dropping pills combined with Lianhua Qingwen granules has advantages in the treatment of nausea, vomiting and limb soreness. During treatment, all participants were treated with western medicine, and there was a significant difference in the use of macrolides among the three groups (P < 0.05). Specifically, the utilization rate of antibiotics in the western medicine group was significantly greater than that of the other two groups. Among the 182 diagnosed patients who completed this clinical trial, 13 patients progressed to severe disease, including one case in the Huoxiang + Lianhua group (1.6 %), five cases in the Lianhua group (8.6 %), and seven cases in the western medicine group (11.1 %). There was no statistical differences in this rate among the three groups (P > 0.05). However, the proportion of patients who progressed to severe disease in the Huoxiang + Lianhua group was the lowest, suggesting that the combination of TCM with western medicine has a potential advantage in improving the prognosis of patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The use of Huoxiang Zhengqi dropping pills and Lianhua Qingwen granules combined with western medicine may have clinical advantages for COVID-19 patients in improving clinical symptoms, reducing utilization rate of anti-infective drugs, and improving patient prognosis, which could pave the way for the use of complementary medicine in treating this infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , China , Disease Progression , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/administration & dosage , Female , Humans , Male , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Middle Aged , Myalgia/drug therapy , Myalgia/etiology , Nausea/drug therapy , Nausea/etiology , Powders , Tablets , Treatment Outcome , Vomiting/drug therapy , Vomiting/etiology
16.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6566-6574, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306659

ABSTRACT

Post recovery manifestations have become another concern in patients who have recovered from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Numerous reports have shown that COVID-19 has a variety of long-term effects on almost all systems including respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, neurological, psychiatric, and dermatological systems. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of the post-COVID syndrome among COVID-19 survivors and to determine the factors associated with persistent symptoms. This prospective study enrolled in patients with COVID-19 followed in hospital or outpatient clinics in Ankara City Hospital. We performed a special questionnaire to inquire about the presence of persistent symptoms beyond 12 weeks from the first diagnosis. Demographic data, comorbid diseases, characteristics of acute COVID-19, presence of persistent symptoms by systems, and knowledge about outpatient clinic visits after recovery were assessed. Of a total of 1007 participants, 39.0% had at least one comorbidity, and 47.5% had persistent symptoms. Fatigue/easy fatigability, myalgia, and loss of weight were the most frequent persistent symptoms (overall 29.3%) followed by respiratory symptoms (25.4%). A total of 235 participants had visited outpatient clinics due to several reasons during the post-COVID-19 period, and 17 of them were hospitalized. Severe acute COVID-19, hospitalization, and presence of comorbidity were independent factors for the development of persistent symptoms. Fully understanding the spectrum of the post-COVID syndrome is essential for appropriate management of all its long-term effects. Our study once again underlined the fact that the prevalence of post-COVID syndrome is higher than expected and concerns many systems, and a multidisciplinary follow-up should be provided to COVID-19 survivors in the post recovery period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Weight Loss , Young Adult
17.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(24): e26371, 2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269625

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Most patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have mild to moderate illness not requiring hospitalization. However, no study has detailed the evolution of symptoms in the first month of illness.At our institution, we conducted remote (telephone and video) visits for all adult outpatients diagnosed with COVID-19 within 24 h of a positive nasopharyngeal polymerase chain test for SARS-CoV-2. We repeated regular video visits at 7, 14, and 28 days after the positive test, retrospectively reviewed the prospective data collected in the remote visits, and constructed a week by week profile of clinical illness, through week 4 of illness.We reviewed the courses of 458 symptomatic patients diagnosed between March 12, 2020, and June 22, 2020, and characterized their weekly courses. Common initial symptoms included fever, headache, cough, and chest pain, which frequently persisted through week 3 or longer. Upper respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms were much shorter lived, present primarily in week 1. Anosmia/ageusia peaked in weeks 2 to 3. Emergency department visits were frequent, with 128 visits in the 423 patients who were not hospitalized and 48 visits among the 35 outpatients (7.6%) who were eventually hospitalized (2 subsequently died). By the fourth week, 28.9% said their illness had completely resolved. After the 4-week follow up, 20 (4.7%) of the 423 nonhospitalized patients had further medical evaluation and management for subacute or chronic COVID-19 symptoms.Mild to moderate outpatient COVID-19 is a prolonged illness, with evolving symptoms commonly lasting into the fourth week of illness.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anosmia/etiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Chest Pain/etiology , Cough/etiology , Dyspnea/etiology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Fever/etiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
18.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(4): 307-312, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266237

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The clinical manifestations of COVID-19 range from mild symptoms to severe pneumonia and severe organ damage. When evaluated specifically for pain, the data so far have shown that myalgia, headache, and chest pain can be seen in patients at varying rates; myalgia and headache, especially, are among the initial symptoms. DESIGN: This retrospective chart review, followed by a descriptive survey design study, was carried out by examining patients afflicted with COVID-19. After discharge, patients were asked about the severity and the body region of their pain, their use of analgesics, their mood and mental health, and their overall quality of life. RESULTS: A total of 206 patients with a mean age of 56.24 ± 16.99 yrs were included in the study. Pain during COVID-19 was found to be higher compared with the preinfectious and postinfectious states. The most frequent painful areas were reported to be the neck and back before the infection, whereas the head and limbs during the infection. The most frequently used analgesic during infection was paracetamol. There was no relationship between the patients' pain and anxiety and depression; the quality of life was found to be worse in patients with persistent pain. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the head and limbs were the most common painful body regions during COVID-19. It was also found that pain can continue in the postinfection period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Myalgia/diagnosis , Pain Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Female , Headache/diagnosis , Humans , Low Back Pain/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Neck Pain/diagnosis , Physical Examination , Primary Health Care/methods , Retrospective Studies
19.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(7): 1263-1271, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1224989

ABSTRACT

To describe the rheumatic and musculoskeletal symptoms at hospitalization as well as their persistence/severity after discharge with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and to identify whether age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and length of hospital stay are associated with persistence of these symptoms. In this single-center cohort study, comprising 300 participants, two phone interviews were conducted (2-week and 1-month after hospitalization) and symptoms were queried with a standardized form. This form included musculoskeletal symptoms and other COVID-19 symptoms. Considering all symptoms (musculoskeletal and other), 100.0%, 86.7%, and 72.0% of patients reported one or more symptoms, at hospitalization, 2-week, and 1-month, respectively. Considering only musculoskeletal symptoms, 92.3%, 72.7%, and 56.3% of patients reported any musculoskeletal symptom at hospitalization, 2-week, and 1-month, respectively. The musculoskeletal symptoms were fatigue (44.3% of patients reported), back pain (22.7%), arthralgia (22.0%), myalgia (21.0%), low back pain (16.3%), and neck pain (10.3%); the other symptoms were shortness of breath (26.3%), loss of taste (15.0%), cough (14.0%), loss of smell (12.3%), loss of appetite (10.3%), headache (8.7%), sore throat (3.0%), diarrhea (1.3%), dizziness (1.3%), and fever (0.3%) at 1-month. Increasing BMI was associated with higher odds of persistence of fatigue (OR: 1.08, 1.03 to 1.13), myalgia (OR: 1.08, 1.01 to 1.14), and arthralgia (OR: 1.07, 1.02 to 1.14, p = 0.012) at 1-month. Nearly three-quarters reported one or more symptoms, with more than half of patients reported any musculoskeletal symptom at 1 month. The most common musculoskeletal symptom was fatigue, followed by back pain, arthralgia, myalgia, low back pain, and neck pain. The persistence of fatigue, myalgia, and arthralgia was related to BMI. The study results increase our understanding of the spectrum of COVID-19, which, in turn, may lead to more efficient and better care for COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
Arthralgia/etiology , Back Pain/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Fatigue/etiology , Myalgia/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Patient Discharge , Prospective Studies
20.
Acta Otolaryngol ; 141(6): 615-620, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139792

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is no clinical instrument evaluating symptoms of COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: To develop a clinical instrument for evaluating symptoms of COVID-19 mild-to-moderate forms. METHODS: COVID-19 patients were recruited from EpiCURA Hospital (Belgium). They completed the COVID-19 Symptom Index (CSI) twice to assess the test-retest reliability. The internal consistency was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha. CSI was completed by healthy subjects to assess the internal validity. Patients completed CSI 6 weeks after the COVID-19 resolution to evaluate the responsiveness to change. RESULTS: Ninety-four COVID-19 patients and 55 healthy individuals completed the evaluations. Symptoms associated with the higher severity score were fatigue, headache and myalgia. The Cronbach's alpha value was 0.801, indicating high internal consistency. The test-retest reliability was adequate (rs = 0.535, p = .001). The correlation between CSI total score and SNOT-22 was high (rs = 0.782; p < .001), supporting a high external validity. COVID-19 patients reported significant higher CSI score than healthy individuals, suggesting an adequate internal validity. The mean CSI significantly decreased after the COVID-19 resolution, supporting a high responsiveness to change property. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: The CSI is a reliable and valid patient reported outcome questionnaire for the evaluation of symptom severity of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment , Adult , Case-Control Studies , Fatigue/etiology , Female , Headache/etiology , Humans , Male , Myalgia/etiology , Reproducibility of Results
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