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1.
Nat Med ; 28(1): 20-23, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1636011
2.
Headache ; 60(10): 2389-2405, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455545

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this experimental study, we aimed to determine whether guided music listening (GML) - a music intervention based on models of mood mediation and attention modulation - modulates masticatory muscle activity and awake bruxism in subjects with chronic painful muscular temporomandibular disorders (TMD myalgia, mTMD), a condition causing a significant burden to patients, their families, and healthcare systems. BACKGROUND: Awake bruxism - a stress behavior characterized by clenching of the teeth - is a strong contributor to chronic mTMD. GML modulates psychological stress and motor responses and could thus reduce muscle activity in chronic musculoskeletal conditions, including mTMD. METHODS: We recorded the electromyographic (EMG) activity in the right masseter of 14 women with chronic (>6 months) mTMD (median [IQR] = 39.5.3 [24.3] years) and 15 pain-free women (median [IQR] = 30.0 [3.5] years) during a GML session, including 3 music (stressful, relaxing, and participants' favorite music) and a no-music (pink noise) control blocks, each lasting 15 minutes. We measured the motor effort of the right masseter relative to the participants' maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), the muscular effort to maintain mandibular posture (EMGposture ), and to produce spontaneous awake bruxism episodes (EMGbruxism ), and the duration and frequency of spontaneous awake bruxism episodes. We tested between-group and within-group (between blocks) differences, as well as the effect of the interaction group by experimental block on these outcome measures. RESULTS: In both groups, EMGposture was significantly affected by the interaction group by experimental block (P < .001). Compared to pink noise [mean (95% CI); mTMD: 2.2 (1.6-2.8) %MVC; Controls: 1.1 (0.5-1.7) %MVC], EMGposture increased during the stressful music block [contrast estimate (95% CI); mTMD: +0.8 (0.7-0.8) %MVC; Controls: +0.3 (0.3-0.4) %MVC; both P < .001], and decreased during the relaxing [mTMD: -0.4 (-0.5 to -0.4) %MVC; Controls: -0.3 (-0.4 to -0.3) %MVC; both P < .001] and favorite [mTMD: -0.5 (-0.6 to -0.5) %MVC; Controls: -0.5 (-0.5 to -0.4) %MVC; both P < .001] music blocks. EMGposture was greater in mTMD individuals than controls during the favorite music [contrast estimate (95% CI): +1.1 (0.2-1.9) %MVC; P = .019] and the pink noise [+1.1 (0.2-2.0) %MVC; P = .014] blocks. EMGbruxism was significantly affected by the interaction group by experimental block (P < .001). In mTMD participants, compared to the pink noise block [mean (95% CI); 23.8 (16.0-31.6) %MVC], EMGbruxism increased during the stressful music block [contrast estimate (95% CI); +10.2 (8.6-11.8) %MVC], and decreased during the relaxing [-6.2 (-8.1 to -4.3) %MVC; P < .001] and favorite [-10.2 (-12.2 to -9.1) %MVC; P < .001] music blocks. These effects were not observed in the control group [mean (95% CI); pink noise: 19.3 (10.9-27.6); stressful: 21.2 (12.9-29.4) %MVC; relaxing: 21.6 (13.3-29.9) %MVC; favorite: 24.2 (15.8-32.7) %MVC; all P > .05]. EMGbruxism was significantly greater in mTMD participants than controls during the stressful music block [contrast estimate (95% CI): +12.9 (1.6-24.2) %MVC; P = .026). GML did not affect the duration or the frequency of awake bruxism in either group (median [IQR], mTMD: 23.5 [96.7] s, range 1-1300 seconds; Controls: 5.5 [22.5], range 0-246 seconds; P = .108). The frequency of awake bruxism episodes was greater in the mTMD group compared to controls only during the pink noise block (median [IQR], mTMD: 5 [15.3] episodes, range 0-62 episodes; Controls: 1 [3] episode, range 0-27 episodes; P = .046). No significant between-group differences were found in either the overall time spent engaging in awake bruxism (median [IQR], mTMD: 23.5 [96.7] s, range 1-1300 seconds; Controls: 5.5 [22.5], range 0-246 seconds; P = .108), or during each block (all P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: In subjects with chronic mTMD, relaxing music and the individual's favorite music decreased the muscular effort during spontaneous awake bruxism episodes by 26% and 44% (relative changes), respectively. In contrast, stressful music increases it by about 43%. Because of its positive effects on awake bruxism, GML with selected music could be a promising and non-invasive component of a multimodal approach for the management of chronic mTMD.


Subject(s)
Bruxism , Chronic Pain , Music Therapy , Music , Myalgia , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders , Adult , Bruxism/complications , Bruxism/physiopathology , Bruxism/psychology , Bruxism/therapy , Chronic Pain/etiology , Chronic Pain/physiopathology , Chronic Pain/psychology , Chronic Pain/therapy , Electromyography , Female , Humans , Masseter Muscle/physiopathology , Middle Aged , Myalgia/etiology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Myalgia/psychology , Myalgia/therapy , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/physiopathology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/psychology , Temporomandibular Joint Disorders/therapy
4.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e92, 2021 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169347

ABSTRACT

Case identification is an ongoing issue for the COVID-19 epidemic, in particular for outpatient care where physicians must decide which patients to prioritise for further testing. This paper reports tools to classify patients based on symptom profiles based on 236 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 positive cases and 564 controls, accounting for the time course of illness using generalised multivariate logistic regression. Significant symptoms included abdominal pain, cough, diarrhoea, fever, headache, muscle ache, runny nose, sore throat, temperature between 37.5 and 37.9 °C and temperature above 38 °C, but their importance varied by day of illness at assessment. With a high percentile threshold for specificity at 0.95, the baseline model had reasonable sensitivity at 0.67. To further evaluate accuracy of model predictions, leave-one-out cross-validation confirmed high classification accuracy with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.92. For the baseline model, sensitivity decreased to 0.56. External validation datasets reported similar result. Our study provides a tool to discern COVID-19 patients from controls using symptoms and day from illness onset with good predictive performance. It could be considered as a framework to complement laboratory testing in order to differentiate COVID-19 from other patients presenting with acute symptoms in outpatient care.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/physiopathology , Case-Control Studies , Clinical Decision Rules , Cough/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Myalgia/physiopathology , Odds Ratio , Patient Selection , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Rhinorrhea/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
5.
Curr Neuropharmacol ; 19(1): 92-96, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154160

ABSTRACT

The pandemic novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has become a global concern in which the respiratory system is not the only one involved. Previous researches have presented the common clinical manifestations including respiratory symptoms (i.e., fever and cough), fatigue and myalgia. However, there is limited evidence for neurological and psychological influences of SARS-CoV-2. In this review, we discuss the common neurological manifestations of COVID-19 including acute cerebrovascular disease (i.e., cerebral hemorrhage) and muscle ache. Possible viral transmission to the nervous system may occur via circulation, an upper nasal transcribrial route and/or conjunctival route. Moreover, we cannot ignore the psychological influence on the public, medical staff and confirmed patients. Dealing with public psychological barriers and performing psychological crisis intervention are an important part of public health interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/physiopathology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/physiopathology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Blood-Brain Barrier , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/psychology , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/transmission , Cerebral Hemorrhage/physiopathology , Conjunctiva , Dizziness/physiopathology , Ethmoid Bone , Headache/physiopathology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Med Case Rep ; 15(1): 171, 2021 Mar 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154035

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The pandemic of this century has overwhelmed the healthcare systems of affected countries, and all resources have been diverted to coronavirus disease 2019. At the onset, coronavirus disease 2019 can present as any other acute febrile undifferentiated illness. In tropical regions, clinicians are increasingly challenged to differentiate these febrile illnesses without the use of diagnostics. With this pandemic, many of these tropical diseases are neglected and go underreported. Dengue is holoendemic in the Maldives, and dengue viruses circulate throughout the year. Reports about coinfections with dengue virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 are scarce, and the outcome and the dynamics of the disease may be altered in the presence of coinfection. We have described the clinical manifestation and serial laboratory profile, and highlighted the atypical findings uncommon in dengue infection. CASE PRESENTATION: Case 1 was a 39-year old Asian male, presented on day 6 of dengue infection with warning signs. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 that was done as per hospital protocol was found to be positive. Case 2 was a 38-year old Asian male, was admitted on day 5 of illness with symptoms of acute respiratory infection with positive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Evaluation of progressive leukopenia and thrombocytopenia showed positive dengue serology. CONCLUSION: Clinicians must be conscientious when working on the differential diagnosis of possible tropical diseases in cases of coronavirus disease 2019, specifically, when patients develop hemoconcentration, thrombocytopenia, and transaminitis with elevated expression of aspartate higher than alanine transaminase, which is frequently observed in dengue infection. Caution must be taken during the administration of intravenous fluids when treating patients with coronavirus disease 2019 and dengue coinfection, as coronavirus disease 2019 patients are more prone to develop pulmonary edema. Timely diagnosis and appropriate management are essential to avoid the devastating complications of severe forms of dengue infection. It is important to repeat and reconfirm the dengue serology in coronavirus disease 2019 patients to avoid false positivity. Diligence and care must be taken not to neglect other endemic tropical diseases in the region during the present pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Dengue/complications , Leukopenia/blood , Thrombocytopenia/blood , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Adult , Anosmia/physiopathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Coinfection , Cough/physiopathology , Dengue/blood , Dengue/physiopathology , Dengue/therapy , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Dysgeusia/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Fluid Therapy , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Myalgia/physiopathology , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vomiting/physiopathology
7.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e930447, 2021 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1134483

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The present study was designed to reveal the trajectory of self-reported somatic symptom burden and sleep quality over time in patients with COVID-19 and to identify prognostic factors for greater somatic symptom burden and sleep disturbance. MATERIAL AND METHODS Seventy-four patients with COVID-19 were prospectively followed for longitudinal assessment of somatic symptom burden and sleep quality. We used the 8-item Somatic Symptom Scale (SSS-8) and the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scale for somatic symptom burden and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index for sleep quality investigation. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent factors associated with somatic symptom burden and sleep quality. RESULTS Although the degree of physical discomfort and sleep quality issues tended to decline during self-quarantine, patients still experienced these problems to a certain degree. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that SSS-8 scores at admission (relative risk [RR] 1.234, 95% CI 1.075-1.417, P=0.003) and mMRC scores at discharge (RR 2.420, 95% CI 1.251-4.682, P=0.009) were 2 independent prognostic indicators of somatic symptom burden. In addition, muscle pain as a chief complaint (RR 4.682, 95% CI 1.247-17.580, P<0.022) and history of use of hypnotic drugs (RR 0.148, 95% CI 0.029-0.749, P<0.019) were 2 independent indicators of patient sleep quality during hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first dynamic assessment of the somatic symptom burden and sleep quality in patients with COVID-19 during hospitalization and quarantine after discharge. Patients with high somatic symptom burden at admission, especially muscle pain as the chief complaint, are prone to having a higher physical burden and more sleep disturbance at discharge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cost of Illness , Medically Unexplained Symptoms , Myalgia/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/diagnosis , Myalgia/etiology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Severity of Illness Index , Sleep/physiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology
8.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(2): e210202, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100834

ABSTRACT

Importance: Owing to concerns of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreaks, many congregant settings are forced to close when cases are detected because there are few data on the risk of different markers of transmission within groups. Objective: To determine whether symptoms and laboratory results on the first day of COVID-19 diagnosis are associated with development of a case cluster in a congregant setting. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study of trainees with COVID-19 from May 11 through August 24, 2020, was conducted at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, the primary site of entry for enlistment in the US Air Force. Symptoms and duration, known contacts, and cycle threshold for trainees diagnosed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were collected. A cycle threshold value represents the number of nucleic acid amplification cycles that occur before a specimen containing the target material generates a signal greater than the predetermined threshold that defines positivity. Cohorts with 5 or more individuals with COVID-19 infection were defined as clusters. Participants included 10 613 trainees divided into 263 parallel cohorts of 30 to 50 people arriving weekly for 7 weeks of training. Exposures: All trainees were quarantined for 14 days on arrival. Testing was performed on arrival, on day 14, and anytime during training when indicated. Protective measures included universal masking, physical distancing, and rapid isolation of trainees with COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: Association between days of symptoms, specific symptoms, number of symptoms, or cycle threshold values of individuals diagnosed with COVID-19 via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subsequent transmission within cohorts. Results: In this cohort study of 10 613 US Air Force basic trainees in 263 cohorts, 403 trainees (3%) received a diagnosis of COVID-19 in 129 cohorts (49%). Among trainees with COVID-19 infection, 318 (79%) were men, and the median (interquartile range [IQR]) age was 20 (19-23) years; 204 (51%) were symptomatic, and 199 (49%) were asymptomatic. Median (IQR) cycle threshold values were lower in symptomatic trainees compared with asymptomatic trainees (21.2 [18.4-27.60] vs 34.8 [29.3-37.4]; P < .001). Cohorts with clusters of individuals with COVID-19 infection were predominantly men (204 cohorts [89%] vs 114 cohorts [64%]; P < .001), had more symptomatic trainees (146 cohorts [64%] vs 53 cohorts [30%]; P < .001), and had more median (IQR) symptoms per patient (3 [2-5] vs 1 [1-2]; P < .001) compared with cohorts without clusters. Within cohorts, subsequent development of clusters of 5 or more individuals with COVID-19 infection compared with those that did not develop clusters was associated with cohorts that had more symptomatic trainees (31 of 58 trainees [53%] vs 43 of 151 trainees [28%]; P = .001) and lower median (IQR) cycle threshold values (22.3 [18.4-27.3] vs 35.3 [26.5-37.8]; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of US Air Force trainees living in a congregant setting during the COVID-19 pandemic, higher numbers of symptoms and lower cycle threshold values were associated with subsequent development of clusters of individuals with COVID-19 infection. These values may be useful if validated in future studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/transmission , Military Personnel/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Carrier State/diagnosis , Carrier State/epidemiology , Carrier State/transmission , Cohort Studies , Cough/physiopathology , Female , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Myalgia/physiopathology , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Residence Characteristics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
9.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(1)2021 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066837

ABSTRACT

A previously healthy 37-year-old man presented with fevers and myalgias for a week with a minimal dry cough. Initial SARS-CoV-2 nasopharyngeal testing was negative, but in light of high community prevalence, he was diagnosed with COVID-19, treated with supportive care and self-quarantined at home. Three days after resolution of all symptoms, he developed sudden onset chest pain. Chest imaging revealed a large right-sided pneumothorax and patchy subpleural ground glass opacities. IgM and IgG antibodies for SARS-CoV-2 were positive. His pneumothorax resolved after placement of a small-bore chest tube, which was removed after 2 days.This case demonstrates that patients with COVID-19 can develop a significant pulmonary complication, a large pneumothorax, despite only minimal lower respiratory tract symptoms and after resolution of the original illness. Medical professionals should consider development of a pneumothorax in patients who have recovered from COVID-19 and present with new respiratory symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Convalescence , Pneumothorax/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Chest Pain/physiopathology , Chest Tubes , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Myalgia/physiopathology , Pneumothorax/diagnostic imaging , Pneumothorax/physiopathology , Pneumothorax/therapy , Radiography, Thoracic , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thoracostomy , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
10.
Ginekol Pol ; 91(12): 755-763, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061493

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Determine the strengths and weakness of a symptomatic screening for COVID-19 in pregnant women. Analyze the clinical presentation, management, and outcomes. DESIGN: Descriptive retrospective observational study. SETTING: Mancha-Centro Hospital (Spain). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Population: Symptomatic pregnant women with confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19. Between the 12th of March and 17th of April 2020, all the symptomatic pregnancies were screened with diagnostic test for SARS-CoV-2. Data collection was done by reviewing the medical records and telephone interviews. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical characteristics, management, treatment, and obstetric and neonatal outcomes. RESULTS: Twenty patients with positive COVID-19 diagnostic test out of thirty-four suspected. The most common symptoms were fever (70%), cough (65%) and myalgia (35%). A unique symptom of presentation in 20% of cases. COVID-19 pneumonia was diagnosed in 30% by chest X-ray and one case had pulmonary embolism associated diagnosed by CT-Scan. Thromboprophylaxis was indicated in 16 out of 20 patients. Eight women finished their pregnancy during the observation period. Type of birth: 25% natural birth, 12.5% assisted vaginal delivery and 62.5% caesarean section. We had three severe cases, two of them with intensive care support. All neonates had negative test for COVID 19 infection. CONCLUSIONS: We recommend universal screening of all pregnant woman for COVID-19 during the pandemic because of the limits of the symptomatic screening seen in this studio and the ratio of asymptomatic pregnancies with positive test for COVID-19 recently published.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Cesarean Section , Cough/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Myalgia/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Adult , Anosmia/physiopathology , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Delivery, Obstetric , Dysgeusia/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Extraction, Obstetrical , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Gestational Age , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Lymphocyte Count , Lymphopenia/physiopathology , Middle Aged , Obesity, Maternal/complications , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Pre-Eclampsia , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/etiology , Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Premature Birth , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/physiopathology , Pulmonary Embolism/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain
11.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 90(4)2020 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059803

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a pandemic with over 5 million cases worldwide. The disease has imposed a huge burden on health resources. Evaluation of clinical and epidemiological profiles of such patients can help in understanding and managing the outbreak more efficiently. This study was a prospective observational analysis of 200 diagnosed COVID-19 patients admitted to a tertiary care center from 20th march to 8th May 2020. All these patients were positive for COVID-19 by an oro-nasopharyngeal swab-rtPCR based testing. Analyses of demographic factors, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, laboratory parameters, and the outcomes were performed. The mean age of the population was 40 years with a slight male predominance (116 patients out of 200, 58%). A majority of the patients (147, 73.5 %) were symptomatic, with fever being the most common symptom (109, 54.5%), followed by cough (91, 45.5%). An older age, presence of symptoms and their duration, leukocytosis, a high quick SOFA score, a high modified SOFA score, need for ventilator support, an AST level more than 3 times the upper limit of normal (ULN), and a serum creatinine level of 2 mg/dl or greater were at a significantly higher risk of ICU admission and mortality. Presence of diabetes mellitus, AST > three times ULN, serum creatinine 2 mg/dl or higher, and a qSOFA score of 1 or higher were all associated with significantly greater odds of critical care requirement. Triage and severity assessment helps in deciding the requirement for a hospital stay and ICU admission for COVID-19 which can easily be done using clinical and laboratory parameters. A mild, moderate and severe category approach with defined criteria and treatment guidelines will help in judicious utilization of health-care resources, especially for developing countries like India.   *Other members of the Safdarjung Hospital COVID-19 working group: Balvinder Singh (Microbiology), MK Sen (Pulmonary Medicine), Shibdas Chakrabarti (Pulmonary Medicine), NK Gupta (Pulmonary medicine), AJ Mahendran (Pulmonary Medicine), Ramesh Meena (Medicine), G Usha (Anaesthesiology), Santvana Kohli (Anaesthesiology), Sahil Diwan (Anaesthesiology), Rushika Saksena (Microbiology), Vikramjeet Dutta (Microbiology), Anupam Kr Anveshi (Microbiology).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Anemia/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Cough/physiopathology , Creatinine/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypoxia/physiopathology , India/epidemiology , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Leukocyte Count , Leukocytosis/blood , Lymphopenia/blood , Lymphopenia/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/physiopathology , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Pandemics , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Platelet Count , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Tachypnea/physiopathology , Tertiary Care Centers , Time Factors , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
Neuro Endocrinol Lett ; 41(5): 223-230, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1055494

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, a new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, appeared in Wuhan, China. This virus is the cause of the COVID-19 disease. This infection later spread to the whole world. The goal of this article is to present the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with COVID-19 treated in the Faculty Hospital Pilsen. METHODS: In this monocentric, retrospective study, clinical and biochemical data of 89 adult patients with COVID-19 was analyzed. These patients were in the care of the Faculty Hospital Pilsen between March 14 and April 7. RESULTS: In this cohort, made up of 89 patients, 63 were treated as outpatients and 26 were hospitalized. 10 patients required intensive care. The most common symptoms among patients were cough and fever. Dyspnea was present in 29 patients. A CT scan showed bilateral pneumonia in 23 of the admitted patients. Fever and bilateral pneumonia were significantly more common in patients ≥ 60 years old (p=0.047, and p=0.001, respectively). Of lab results, the patients in intensive care had significantly higher values of C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, lactate dehydrogenase, interleukin 6, myoglobin and ferritin. CONCLUSION: The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever and cough. These two symptoms are simultaneously present in more than half the cases. Approximately 1/10th of patients requires intensive care. Higher values of lactate dehydrogenase, myoglobin and ferritin on patient admission appear to be a strong predictive factor of the patient's status progressing into requiring ICU attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Arthralgia/physiopathology , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Czech Republic/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Ferritins/blood , Headache/physiopathology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-6/blood , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/physiopathology , Myoglobin/blood , Obesity/epidemiology , Procalcitonin/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
13.
Chest ; 159(2): e107-e113, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1053266

ABSTRACT

CASE PRESENTATION: A 53-year-old man presented to the ED at a time of low severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, also known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), prevalence and reported 2 weeks of progressive shortness of breath, dry cough, headache, myalgias, diarrhea, and recurrent low-grade fevers to 39°C for 1 week with several days of recorded peripheral capillary oxygen saturation of 80% to 90% (room air) on home pulse oximeter. Five days earlier, he had visited an urgent care center where a routine respiratory viral panel was reportedly negative. A COVID-19 reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction test result was pending at the time of ED visit. He reported a past medical history of gastroesophageal reflux disease that was treated with famotidine. Travel history included an out-of-state trip 3 weeks earlier, but no recent international travel.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Bacteremia/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Cerebellar Diseases/complications , Cerebellar Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Cough/physiopathology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Fever/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Lymphopenia/physiopathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/physiopathology , Oximetry , Pneumonia, Staphylococcal/complications , Radiography, Thoracic , SARS-CoV-2 , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
14.
J Neurovirol ; 27(1): 26-34, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046668

ABSTRACT

Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome is a heterogeneous constellation of symptoms ranging from full combination of these three neurological findings to varying degrees of isolated individual sign. Since the emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), neurological symptoms, syndromes, and complications associated with this multi-organ viral infection have been reported and the various aspects of neurological involvement are increasingly uncovered. As a neuro-inflammatory disorder, one would expect to observe opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome after a prevalent viral infection in a pandemic scale, as it has been the case for many other neuro-inflammatory syndromes. We report seven cases of opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome presumably parainfectious in nature and discuss their phenomenology, their possible pathophysiological relationship to COVID-19, and diagnostic and treatment strategy in each case. Finally, we review the relevant data in the literature regarding the opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and possible similar cases associated with COVID-19 and its diagnostic importance for clinicians in various fields of medicine encountering COVID-19 patients and its complications.


Subject(s)
Ataxia/physiopathology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cough/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Ataxia/diagnostic imaging , Ataxia/drug therapy , Ataxia/etiology , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/drug therapy , Clonazepam/therapeutic use , Cough/diagnostic imaging , Cough/drug therapy , Cough/etiology , Dyspnea/diagnostic imaging , Dyspnea/drug therapy , Dyspnea/etiology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/diagnostic imaging , Fever/drug therapy , Fever/etiology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Levetiracetam/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/diagnostic imaging , Myalgia/drug therapy , Myalgia/etiology , Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome/drug therapy , Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome/etiology , Oseltamivir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Valproic Acid/therapeutic use
15.
Semin Perinatol ; 44(7): 151284, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030195

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic poses unique challenges to the medical community as the optimal treatment has not been determined and is often at the discretion of institutional guidelines. Pregnancy has previously been described as a high-risk state in the context of infectious diseases, given a particular susceptibility to pathogens and adverse outcomes. Although ongoing studies have provided insight on the course of this disease in the adult population, the implications of COVID-19 on pregnancy remains an understudied area. The objective of this study is to review the literature and describe clinical presentations among pregnant women afflicted with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Acute Kidney Injury/physiopathology , Anosmia/physiopathology , Asymptomatic Infections , Blood Coagulation Disorders/physiopathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing , Cardiomyopathies/physiopathology , Central Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Female , HELLP Syndrome/metabolism , Humans , Hypercapnia , Hypoxia/diagnosis , Hypoxia/physiopathology , Hypoxia/therapy , Liver Diseases/metabolism , Liver Diseases/physiopathology , Mass Screening , Myalgia/physiopathology , Myocarditis/physiopathology , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Pre-Eclampsia/metabolism , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/metabolism , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Taste Disorders/physiopathology
16.
Semin Perinatol ; 44(7): 151283, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030189

ABSTRACT

As of June 19, 2020 there are more than 8.6 million COVID-19 cases worldwide with over 450,000 deaths. Providing obstetrical care in the setting of the pandemic poses challenges to the healthcare system in that, in comparison to many other medical specialties, obstetrical care cannot be deferred. Pregnant patients represent a high risk population for exposure and infection with respiratory pathogens and, as they require multiple points of contact with the healthcare system, are especially vulnerable. The purpose of this review is assess current epidemiology and outcomes research related to COVID-19 with a focus on obstetric patients. This review covers the global spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, symptomatology, modes of transmission, and current knowledge gaps related to epidemiology and outcomes for the obstetric population.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Hypoxia/physiopathology , Hypoxia/therapy , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Myalgia/physiopathology , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/physiopathology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
17.
Neuro Endocrinol Lett ; 41(5): 223-230, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-972898

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In December 2019, a new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, appeared in Wuhan, China. This virus is the cause of the COVID-19 disease. This infection later spread to the whole world. The goal of this article is to present the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with COVID-19 treated in the Faculty Hospital Pilsen. METHODS: In this monocentric, retrospective study, clinical and biochemical data of 89 adult patients with COVID-19 was analyzed. These patients were in the care of the Faculty Hospital Pilsen between March 14 and April 7. RESULTS: In this cohort, made up of 89 patients, 63 were treated as outpatients and 26 were hospitalized. 10 patients required intensive care. The most common symptoms among patients were cough and fever. Dyspnea was present in 29 patients. A CT scan showed bilateral pneumonia in 23 of the admitted patients. Fever and bilateral pneumonia were significantly more common in patients ≥ 60 years old (p=0.047, and p=0.001, respectively). Of lab results, the patients in intensive care had significantly higher values of C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, lactate dehydrogenase, interleukin 6, myoglobin and ferritin. CONCLUSION: The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever and cough. These two symptoms are simultaneously present in more than half the cases. Approximately 1/10th of patients requires intensive care. Higher values of lactate dehydrogenase, myoglobin and ferritin on patient admission appear to be a strong predictive factor of the patient's status progressing into requiring ICU attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Fever/physiopathology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Arthralgia/physiopathology , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Czech Republic/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Female , Ferritins/blood , Headache/physiopathology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-6/blood , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/physiopathology , Myoglobin/blood , Obesity/epidemiology , Procalcitonin/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
19.
Brain Behav Immun ; 88: 11-16, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-935435

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) represents a novel pneumonia leading to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Recent studies documented that SARS-Coronavirus2 (SARS-CoV2), responsible for COVID-19, can affect the nervous system. The aim of the present observational study was to prospectively assess subjective neurological symptoms (sNS) in patients with SARS-CoV2 infection. METHODS: We included patients hospitalized at the University Hospital of Rome "Tor Vergata", medical center dedicated to the treatment of patients with COVID-19 diagnosis, who underwent an anamnestic interview about sNS consisting of 13 items, each related to a specific symptom, requiring a dichotomized answer. RESULTS: We included 103 patients with SARS-CoV2 infection. Ninety-four patients (91.3%) reported at least one sNS. Sleep impairment was the most frequent symptom, followed by dysgeusia, headache, hyposmia, and depression. Women more frequently complained hyposmia, dysgeusia, dizziness, numbeness/paresthesias, daytime sleepiness, and muscle ache. Moreover, muscle ache and daytime sleepiness were more frequent in the first 2 days after admission. Conversely, sleep impairment was more frequent in patients with more than 7 days of hospitalization. In these patients we also documented higher white blood cells and lower C-reactive protein levels. These laboratory findings correlated with the occurrence of hyposmia, dysgeusia, headache, daytime sleepiness, and depression. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with SARS-CoV2 infection frequently present with sNS. These symptoms are present from the early phases of the disease. The possibly intrinsic neurotropic properties of SARS-CoV2 may justify the very high frequency of sNS. Further studies targeted at investigating the consequences of SARS-CoV2 infection on the CNS should be planned.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Depression/physiopathology , Dysgeusia/physiopathology , Headache/physiopathology , Olfaction Disorders/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Sleepiness , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , C-Reactive Protein/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Depression/epidemiology , Dizziness/epidemiology , Dizziness/physiopathology , Dysgeusia/epidemiology , Female , Headache/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Hypesthesia/epidemiology , Hypesthesia/physiopathology , Italy/epidemiology , Leukocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/epidemiology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Olfaction Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Paresthesia/epidemiology , Paresthesia/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Distribution , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/physiopathology
20.
J Med Virol ; 92(10): 2181-2187, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-935110

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is spreading at a rapid pace, and the World Health Organization declared it as pandemic on 11 March 2020. Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an "atypical" bacterial pathogen commonly known to cause respiratory illness in humans. The coinfection from SARS-CoV-2 and mycoplasma pneumonia is rarely reported in the literature to the best of our knowledge. We present a study in which 6 of 350 patients confirmed with COVID-19 were also diagnosed with M. pneumoniae infection. In this study, we described the clinical characteristics of patients with coinfection. Common symptoms at the onset of illness included fever (six [100%] patients); five (83.3%) patients had a cough, shortness of breath, and fatigue. The other symptoms were myalgia (66.6%), gastrointestinal symptoms (33.3%-50%), and altered mental status (16.7%). The laboratory parameters include lymphopenia, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, lactate dehydrogenase, interleukin-6, serum ferritin, and D-dimer in all six (100%) patients. The chest X-ray at presentation showed bilateral infiltrates in all the patients (100%). We also described electrocardiogram findings, complications, and treatment during hospitalization in detail. One patient died during the hospital course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Hypertension/physiopathology , Mycoplasma pneumoniae/pathogenicity , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Coinfection , Comorbidity , Cough/physiopathology , Dyspnea/physiopathology , Fatigue/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Humans , Hypertension/diagnostic imaging , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/therapy , Lymphocytes/pathology , Lymphocytes/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Myalgia/physiopathology , Mycoplasma pneumoniae/drug effects , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/mortality , Pneumonia, Mycoplasma/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
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