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1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(4)2022 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715394

ABSTRACT

Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the ten leading causes of death worldwide. Patients with TB have been observed to suffer from depression and anxiety linked to social variables. Previous experiments found that the substantial pulmonary inflammation associated with TB causes neuroinflammation, neuronal death, and behavioral impairments in the absence of brain infection. Curcumin (CUR) is a natural product with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities. In this work, we evaluated the CUR effect on the growth control of mycobacteria in the lungs and the anti-inflammatory effect in the brain using a model of progressive pulmonary TB in BALB/c mice infected with drug-sensitive mycobacteria (strain H37Rv). The results have shown that CUR decreased lung bacilli load and pneumonia of infected animals. Finally, CUR significantly decreased neuroinflammation (expression of TNFα, IFNγ and IL12) and slightly increased the levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related to factor 2 (Nrf2) and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, improving behavioral status. These results suggest that CUR has a bactericidal effect and can control pulmonary mycobacterial infection and reduce neuroinflammation. It seems that CUR has a promising potential as adjuvant therapy in TB treatment.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antitubercular Agents/pharmacology , Brain/microbiology , Curcumin/pharmacology , Lung/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Tuberculosis/drug therapy , Animals , Brain/metabolism , Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor/metabolism , Disease Models, Animal , Inflammation/drug therapy , Inflammation/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects , Tuberculosis/metabolism , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/metabolism
2.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261849, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1623664

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) and COVID-19 pandemics are both diseases of public health threat globally. Both diseases are caused by pathogens that infect mainly the respiratory system, and are involved in airborne transmission; they also share some clinical signs and symptoms. We, therefore, took advantage of collected sputum samples at the early stage of COVID-19 outbreak in Ghana to conduct differential diagnoses of long-standing endemic respiratory illness, particularly tuberculosis. METHODOLOGY: Sputum samples collected through the enhanced national surveys from suspected COVID-19 patients and contact tracing cases were analyzed for TB. The sputum samples were processed using Cepheid's GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay in pools of 4 samples to determine the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Positive pools were then decoupled and analyzed individually. Details of positive TB samples were forwarded to the NTP for appropriate case management. RESULTS: Seven-hundred and seventy-four sputum samples were analyzed for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in both suspected COVID-19 cases (679/774, 87.7%) and their contacts (95/774, 12.3%). A total of 111 (14.3%) were diagnosed with SARS CoV-2 infection and six (0.8%) out of the 774 individuals tested positive for pulmonary tuberculosis: five (83.3%) males and one female (16.7%). Drug susceptibility analysis identified 1 (16.7%) rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis case. Out of the six TB positive cases, 2 (33.3%) tested positive for COVID-19 indicating a coinfection. Stratifying by demography, three out of the six (50%) were from the Ayawaso West District. All positive cases received appropriate treatment at the respective sub-district according to the national guidelines. CONCLUSION: Our findings highlight the need for differential diagnosis among COVID-19 suspected cases and regular active TB surveillance in TB endemic settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/diagnosis , Coinfection/epidemiology , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/genetics , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/diagnosis , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/epidemiology , Antibiotics, Antitubercular/pharmacology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection/virology , Diagnosis, Differential , Drug Resistance, Bacterial/drug effects , Female , Ghana/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects , Rifampin/pharmacology , Sputum/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/microbiology
3.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261442, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593549

ABSTRACT

A laboratory validation study was conducted to assess the equivalence of Xpert MTB/RIF Ultra testing on the GeneXpert System and the GeneXpert Omni System ('Omni') for tuberculosis and rifampicin resistance. High concordance of the two devices was demonstrated for well-characterized clinical samples as well as control materials, with controls tested on Omni at normal and challenging environmental conditions (i.e. 35°C, 90% relative humidity). Equivalence of the Cts for all probes was also shown. Equivalence was demonstrated for the Omni and GeneXpert devices for tuberculosis and rifampicin resistance detection for a diverse range of clinical specimens and environmental conditions.


Subject(s)
Antibiotics, Antitubercular/pharmacology , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects , Point-of-Care Testing , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant/diagnosis , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/diagnosis , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/genetics , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/genetics , Humans , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/genetics , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/isolation & purification , Rifampin/pharmacology , Sputum/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant/drug therapy , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/drug therapy
4.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(22)2021 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534090

ABSTRACT

Twenty lupane type A-ring azepano-triterpenoids were synthesized from betulin and its related derivatives and their antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, mono-resistant MTB strains, and nontuberculous strains Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium avium were investigated in the framework of AToMIc (Anti-mycobacterial Target or Mechanism Identification Contract) realized by the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, NIAID, National Institute of Health. Of all the tested triterpenoids, 17 compounds showed antitubercular activity and 6 compounds were highly active on the H37Rv wild strain (with MIC 0.5 µM for compound 7), out of which 4 derivatives also emerged as highly active compounds on the three mono-resistant MTB strains. Molecular docking corroborated with a machine learning drug-drug similarity algorithm revealed that azepano-triterpenoids have a rifampicin-like antitubercular activity, with compound 7 scoring the highest as a potential M. tuberculosis RNAP potential inhibitor. FIC testing demonstrated an additive effect of compound 7 when combined with rifampin, isoniazid and ethambutol. Most compounds were highly active against M. avium with compound 14 recording the same MIC value as the control rifampicin (0.0625 µM). The antitubercular ex vivo effectiveness of the tested compounds on THP-1 infected macrophages is correlated with their increased cell permeability. The tested triterpenoids also exhibit low cytotoxicity and do not induce antibacterial resistance in MTB strains.


Subject(s)
Antitubercular Agents/chemistry , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects , Triterpenes/chemistry , Tuberculosis/drug therapy , Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Antitubercular Agents/pharmacology , DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/antagonists & inhibitors , DNA-Directed RNA Polymerases/genetics , Drug Design , Drug Resistance, Bacterial/genetics , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Structure , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/pathogenicity , Rifampin/pharmacology , Triterpenes/pharmacology , Tuberculosis/genetics , Tuberculosis/microbiology
5.
Front Immunol ; 12: 656419, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506563

ABSTRACT

Tuberculosis (TB) is the global health problem with the second highest number of deaths from a communicable disease after COVID-19. Although TB is curable, poor health infrastructure, long and grueling TB treatments have led to the spread of TB pandemic with alarmingly increasing multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB prevalence. Alternative host modulating therapies can be employed to improve TB drug efficacies or dampen the exaggerated inflammatory responses to improve lung function. Here, we investigated the adjunct therapy of natural immune-modulatory compound berberine in C57BL/6 mouse model of pulmonary TB. Berberine treatment did not affect Mtb growth in axenic cultures; however, it showed increased bacterial killing in primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. Ad libitum berberine administration was beneficial to the host in combination with rifampicin and isoniazid. Berberine adjunctive treatment resulted in decreased lung pathology with no additive or synergistic effects on bacterial burdens in mice. Lung immune cell flow cytometry analysis showed that adjunctive berberine treatment decreased neutrophil, CD11b+ dendritic cell and recruited interstitial macrophage numbers. Late onset of adjunctive berberine treatment resulted in a similar phenotype with consistently reduced numbers of neutrophils both in lungs and the spleen. Together, our results suggest that berberine can be supplemented as an immunomodulatory agent depending on the disease stage and inflammatory status of the host.


Subject(s)
Antitubercular Agents/therapeutic use , Berberine/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Isoniazid/therapeutic use , Rifampin/therapeutic use , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Animals , Antitubercular Agents/pharmacology , Berberine/pharmacology , Cytokines/immunology , Dendritic Cells/drug effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Isoniazid/pharmacology , Lung/drug effects , Lung/immunology , Lung/microbiology , Lung/pathology , Macrophages/drug effects , Macrophages/immunology , Male , Mice, Inbred C3H , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/growth & development , Neutrophils/drug effects , Neutrophils/immunology , Rifampin/pharmacology , Spleen/drug effects , Spleen/immunology , Spleen/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/immunology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/microbiology , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/pathology
6.
Food Funct ; 12(20): 9607-9619, 2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500759

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019, the COVID-19 virus spread worldwide, infecting millions of people. Infectious diseases induced by pathogenic microorganisms such as the influenza virus, hepatitis virus, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also a major threat to public health. The high mortality caused by infectious pathogenic microorganisms is due to their strong virulence, which leads to the excessive counterattack by the host immune system and severe inflammatory damage of the immune system. This paper reviews the efficacy, mechanism and related immune regulation of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) as an anti-pathogenic microorganism drug. EGCG mainly shows both direct and indirect anti-infection effects. EGCG directly inhibits early infection by interfering with the adsorption on host cells, inhibiting virus replication and reducing bacterial biofilm formation and toxin release; EGCG indirectly inhibits infection by regulating immune inflammation and antioxidation. At the same time, we reviewed the bioavailability and safety of EGCG in vivo. At present, the bioavailability of EGCG can be improved to some extent using nanostructured drug delivery systems and molecular modification technology in combination with other drugs. This study provides a theoretical basis for the development of EGCG as an adjuvant drug for anti-pathogenic microorganisms.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Catechin/analogs & derivatives , Catechin/pharmacology , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Animals , Antioxidants/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus/drug effects , Hepatitis Viruses/drug effects , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects , Orthomyxoviridae/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
7.
Food Funct ; 12(20): 9607-9619, 2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434159

ABSTRACT

At the end of 2019, the COVID-19 virus spread worldwide, infecting millions of people. Infectious diseases induced by pathogenic microorganisms such as the influenza virus, hepatitis virus, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also a major threat to public health. The high mortality caused by infectious pathogenic microorganisms is due to their strong virulence, which leads to the excessive counterattack by the host immune system and severe inflammatory damage of the immune system. This paper reviews the efficacy, mechanism and related immune regulation of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) as an anti-pathogenic microorganism drug. EGCG mainly shows both direct and indirect anti-infection effects. EGCG directly inhibits early infection by interfering with the adsorption on host cells, inhibiting virus replication and reducing bacterial biofilm formation and toxin release; EGCG indirectly inhibits infection by regulating immune inflammation and antioxidation. At the same time, we reviewed the bioavailability and safety of EGCG in vivo. At present, the bioavailability of EGCG can be improved to some extent using nanostructured drug delivery systems and molecular modification technology in combination with other drugs. This study provides a theoretical basis for the development of EGCG as an adjuvant drug for anti-pathogenic microorganisms.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Catechin/analogs & derivatives , Catechin/pharmacology , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Animals , Antioxidants/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus/drug effects , Hepatitis Viruses/drug effects , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects , Orthomyxoviridae/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects
8.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 18023, 2021 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402127

ABSTRACT

Similar to global trends, the incidence rate of tuberculosis (TB) in China declined from 2000 to 2018. In this study, we aimed to evaluate TB trends in northern Guizhou Province and identify risk factors associated with rifampicin-resistant (RR) and concurrent extrapulmonary TB (EPTB). We analyzed data of TB patients hospitalized in Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical University from 2011 to 2018, and assessed correlations between demographic characteristics of patients and RR-TB as well as concurrent EPTB. Our results showed that numbers of new, retreated, RR-TB and concurrent EPTB cases increased gradually from 2011 to 2018. Retreated patients had the highest odds of RR-TB but a lower likelihood of concurrent EPTB compared to new patients. Patients between 21 and 40 years of age had a higher likelihood of RR-TB compared to those 20 years and younger. Female patients and patients from Bijie city as well as the Miao ethnic minority had higher odds of concurrent EPTB. In summary, our data demonstrate upward trends in new, rifampicin-resistant and concurrent extrapulmonary TB cases in northern Guizhou Province of China, which should not be overlooked especially during and post the COVID-19 pandemic because TB is a greater long-term global health threat than COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibiotics, Antitubercular/therapeutic use , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/drug effects , Rifampin/therapeutic use , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/drug therapy , Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , China/epidemiology , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial/physiology , Expert Systems , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/genetics , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/isolation & purification , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Young Adult
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