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1.
Acta Medica (Hradec Kralove) ; 64(4): 227-231, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1743012

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus infectious disease-19 caused by Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome-coronavirus-2 has emerged to be an emergency global health crisis for more than a year. And, as the disease has spread, a number of new clinical features have been observed in these patients. Immunosuppression caused by this disease results in an exacerbation of pre-existing infections. While corticosteroids are considered a life-saving therapeutic intervention for this pandemic, they have proved to be a double-edged sword and their indiscriminate use has produced some deleterious results. Recently, in the backdrop of this expression, a notable rise in invasive fungal infections has been identified even in the post-remission phase. Mucormycosis, Aspergillosis, and Candidiasis are the three most common opportunistic fungal infections among those observed. COVID-19 patients with diabetes mellitus are already at a higher risk of developing such secondary infections due to impaired immunity. Here we present a rare case report of a 50-year old male diabetic mellitus patient diagnosed with dual fungal infections (Aspergillosis along with Mucormycosis) leading to maxillary sinusitis as a post-COVID manifestation. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported till date.


Subject(s)
Aspergillosis , COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Maxillary Sinusitis , Mucormycosis , Mycoses , Aspergillosis/complications , Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Aspergillosis/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Male , Maxillary Sinusitis/complications , Middle Aged , Mucormycosis/complications , Mucormycosis/diagnosis , Mucormycosis/therapy , Mycoses/complications , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Pol Arch Intern Med ; 132(5)2022 05 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1727115

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with COVID­19 may develop concomitant viral, bacterial, or fungal infections. Such patients are at a higher risk of death, especially from a critical illness. Although much attention has been recently given to fungal infections that may have devastating consequences, data on this issue are scarce. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to assess the impact and prevalence of fungal infections in critically ill patients with COVID 19. METHODS: We systematically searched for studies that focused on critically ill adults diagnosed with COVID­19 and a fungal coinfection. Mortality was our outcome of interest. The search was conducted within MEDLINE, Web of Science, clinicaltrials.gov, Embase, and Cochrane Library on January 8, 2022. RESULTS: We reviewed 38 papers covering 17 695 patients, 1182 (6.7%) of whom had an acquired fungal infection. The overall mortality in the papers retrieved for a systematic review (n = 38) varied from 29% to 100% (median [IQR], 56% [40%-77%]). In a meta­analysis (19 studies), the patients with a fungal infection were more likely to die than the controls (odds ratio [OR], 2.987; 95% CI, 2.369-3.767; P <0.001; I2 = 26.63%). Subgroup analyses showed that COVID­19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) increased mortality by 3 times (OR, 3.279; 95% CI, 2.692-3.994; P <0.001; I2 = 0%), and that COVID­19-associated candidiasis (CAC) increased mortality by 2 times (OR, 2.254; 95% CI, 1.322-3.843; I2 = 26.14%). CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients with COVID­ 19, CAPA is rather common and significantly increases mortality. The evidence regarding other fungal infections is weaker, with CAC occurring less frequently but also impacting mortality. Therefore, clinical awareness and screening are needed, followed by personalized antifungal therapy stewardship, which is strongly recommended in order to improve the patients' prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mycoses , Adult , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Critical Illness , Humans , Mycoses/complications , Mycoses/epidemiology
3.
Viruses ; 13(11)2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1481016

ABSTRACT

Antimicrobial resistance is an urgent threat to public health and global development; in this scenario, the SARS-CoV2 pandemic has caused a major disruption of healthcare systems and practices. A narrative review was conducted on articles focusing on the impact of COVID-19 on multidrug-resistant gram-negative, gram-positive bacteria, and fungi. We found that, worldwide, multiple studies reported an unexpected high incidence of infections due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus, carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and C. auris among COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit. In this setting, inappropriate antimicrobial exposure, environmental contamination, and discontinuation of infection control measures may have driven selection and diffusion of drug-resistant pathogens.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Drug Resistance, Fungal , Mycoses/microbiology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/drug effects , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Coinfection/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Fungi/drug effects , Humans , Infection Control , Intensive Care Units , Mycoses/complications , Mycoses/epidemiology
4.
Ann Clin Microbiol Antimicrob ; 20(1): 69, 2021 Sep 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438275

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 causes COVID-19 illness which can progress to severe pneumonia. Empiric antibacterials are often employed though frequency of bacterial coinfection superinfection is debated and concerns raised about selection of bacterial antimicrobial resistance. We evaluated sputum bacterial and fungal growth from 165 intubated COVID-19 pneumonia patients. Objectives were to determine frequency of culture positivity, risk factors for and outcomes of positive cultures, and timing of antimicrobial resistance development. METHODS: Retrospective reviews were conducted of COVID-19 pneumonia patients requiring intubation admitted to a 1058-bed four community hospital system on the east coast United States, March 1 to May 1, 2020. Length of stay (LOS) was expressed as mean (standard deviation); 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was computed for overall mortality rate using the exact binomial method, and overall mortality was compared across each level of a potential risk factor using a Chi-Square Test of Independence. All tests were two-sided, and significance level was set to 0.05. RESULTS: Average patient age was 68.7 years and LOS 19.9 days. Eighty-three patients (50.3% of total) originated from home, 10 from group homes (6.1% of total), and 72 from nursing facilities (43.6% of total). Mortality was 62.4%, highest for nursing home residents (80.6%). Findings from 253 sputum cultures overall did not suggest acute bacterial or fungal infection in 73 (45%) of 165 individuals sampled within 24 h of intubation. Cultures ≥ 1 week following intubation did grow potential pathogens in 72 (64.9%) of 111 cases with 70.8% consistent with late pneumonia and 29.2% suggesting colonization. Twelve (10.8% of total) of these late post-intubation cultures revealed worsened antimicrobial resistance predominantly in Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, or Staphylococcus aureus. CONCLUSIONS: In severe COVID-19 pneumonia, a radiographic ground glass interstitial pattern and lack of purulent sputum prior to/around the time of intubation correlated with no culture growth or recovery of normal oral flora ± yeast. Discontinuation of empiric antibacterials should be considered in these patients aided by other clinical findings, history of prior antimicrobials, laboratory testing, and overall clinical course. Continuing longterm hospitalisation and antibiotics are associated with sputum cultures reflective of hospital-acquired microbes and increasing antimicrobial resistance. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Not applicable as this was a retrospective chart review study without interventional arm.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/drug effects , Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cross Infection/complications , Fungi/drug effects , Mycoses/complications , Pneumonia/therapy , Sputum/microbiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/genetics , Bacteria/isolation & purification , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Cross Infection/drug therapy , Cross Infection/microbiology , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Fungal , Female , Fungi/genetics , Fungi/isolation & purification , Hospitalization , Humans , Intubation , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Mycoses/microbiology , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/mortality , Pneumonia/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
5.
J Med Virol ; 93(3): 1459-1464, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196452

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tocilizumab (TCZ) has been used in the management of COVID-19-related cytokine release syndrome (CRS). Concerns exist regarding the risk of infections and drug-related toxicities. We sought to evaluate the incidence of these TCZ complications among COVID-19 patients. METHODS: All adult inpatients with COVID-19 between 1 March and 25 April 2020 that received TCZ were included. We compared the rate of late-onset infections (>48 hours following admission) to a control group matched according to intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation requirement. Post-TCZ toxicities evaluated included: elevated liver function tests (LFTs), GI perforation, diverticulitis, neutropenia, hypertension, allergic reactions, and infusion-related reactions. RESULTS: Seventy-four patients were included in each group. Seventeen infections in the TCZ group (23%) and 6 (8%) infections in the control group occurred >48 hours after admission (P = .013). Most infections were bacterial with pneumonia being the most common manifestation. Among patients receiving TCZ, LFT elevations were observed in 51%, neutropenia in 1.4%, and hypertension in 8%. The mortality rate among those that received TCZ was greater than the control (39% versus 23%, P = .03). CONCLUSION: Late onset infections were significantly more common among those receiving TCZ. Combining infections and TCZ-related toxicities, 61% of patients had a possible post-TCZ complication. While awaiting clinical trial results to establish the efficacy of TCZ for COVID-19 related CRS, the potential for infections and TCZ related toxicities should be carefully weighed when considering use.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Mycoses/complications , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Biomarkers, Pharmacological/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Humans , Inpatients , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
6.
J Hosp Infect ; 113: 145-154, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1182572

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 predisposes patients to secondary infections; however, a better understanding of the impact of coinfections on the outcome of hospitalized COVID-19 patients is still necessary. AIM: To analyse death risk due to coinfections in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: The odds of death of 212 severely ill COVID-19 patients were evaluated, with detailed focus on the risks for each pathogen, site of infection, comorbidities and length of hospitalization. FINDINGS: The mortality rate was 50.47%. Fungal and/or bacterial isolation occurred in 89 patients, of whom 83.14% died. Coinfected patients stayed hospitalized longer and had an increased odds of dying (odds ratio (OR): 13.45; R2 = 0.31). The risk of death was increased by bacterial (OR: 11.28) and fungal (OR: 5.97) coinfections, with increased levels of creatinine, leucocytes, urea and C-reactive protein. Coinfections increased the risk of death if patients suffered from cardiovascular disease (OR: 11.53), diabetes (OR: 6.00) or obesity (OR: 5.60) in comparison with patients with these comorbidities but without pathogen isolation. The increased risk of death was detected for coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (OR: 25.39), Candida non-albicans (OR: 11.12), S. aureus (OR: 10.72), Acinetobacter spp. (OR: 6.88), Pseudomonas spp. (OR: 4.77), and C. albicans (OR: 3.97). The high-risk sites of infection were blood, tracheal aspirate, and urine. Patients with coinfection undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation were 3.8 times more likely to die than those without positive cultures. CONCLUSION: Severe COVID-19 patients with secondary coinfections required longer hospitalization and had higher risk of death. The early diagnosis of coinfections is essential to identify high-risk patients and to determine the right interventions to reduce mortality.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , Coinfection/mortality , Mycoses/mortality , Adult , Aged , Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Mycoses/complications , Respiration, Artificial
7.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(5): 1454-1456, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148277

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe coronavirus disease (COVID-19) may have COVID-19-associated invasive mold infection (CAIMI) develop. We report 16 cases of CAIMI among 146 nonimmunocompromised patients with severe COVID-19 at an academic hospital in Santiago, Chile. These rates correspond to a CAIMI incidence of 11%; the mortality rate for these patients was 31.2%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Mycoses , Chile/epidemiology , Humans , Mycoses/complications , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 13(6): 7745-7757, 2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143936

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has infected tens of millions of people worldwide within the last year. However, the incidence of fungal co-infection in COVID-19 patients remains unclear. To investigate the association between fungal co-infection and mortality due to COVID-19, we systematically searched Medline, Embase, MedRxiv and Cochrane Library for eligible studies published in the period from 1 January to 1 December 2020. We performed a meta-analysis of nine studies that met the inclusion criteria. In total, data from 2780 patients and 426 patients were included who were admitted to the ICU. In eight of the articles, 211 participants died due to COVID-19 infection, which means an overall mortality rate of 10.9%. The overall pooled proportion of fungal co-infection in COVID-19 patients was 0.12 (95% CI = 0.07-0.16, n = 2780, I2 = 96.8%). In terms of mortality in COVID-19 patients with fungal infection, the overall pooled proportion of mortality was 0.17 (95% CI = 0.10-0.24, n = 1944, I2 = 95.6%). These findings provide evidence suggesting a favorable use for empirical antibiotics in the majority of patients when COVID-19 infection is diagnosed. Our analysis is investigating the use of antifungal therapy to treat COVID-19 can serve as a comprehensive reference for COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mycoses/complications , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Mycoses/drug therapy , Patient Admission , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
9.
Int J Antimicrob Agents ; 57(4): 106324, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141886

ABSTRACT

In addition to SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) infection itself, an increase in the incidence of antimicrobial resistance poses collateral damage to the current status of the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic. There has been a rapid increase in multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), including extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae, carbapenem-resistant New Delhi metallo-ß-lactamase (NDM)-producing Enterobacterales, Acinetobacter baumannii, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), pan-echinocandin-resistant Candida glabrata and multi-triazole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus. The cause is multifactorial and is particularly related to high rates of antimicrobial agent utilisation in COVID-19 patients with a relatively low rate of co- or secondary infection. Appropriate prescription and optimised use of antimicrobials according to the principles of antimicrobial stewardship as well as quality diagnosis and aggressive infection control measures may help prevent the occurrence of MDROs during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/drug therapy , Drug Resistance, Microbial , Mycoses/complications , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Antimicrobial Stewardship , Bacteria/drug effects , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Drug Utilization , Fungi/drug effects , Humans , Incidence , Mycoses/drug therapy , Mycoses/epidemiology , Pandemics
10.
Indian J Dent Res ; 31(5): 669, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024709
13.
Future Microbiol ; 15: 1405-1413, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-883809

ABSTRACT

As the global COVID-19 pandemic spreads worldwide, new challenges arise in the clinical landscape. The need for reliable diagnostic methods, treatments and vaccines for COVID-19 is the major worldwide urgency. While these goals are especially important, the growing risk of co-infections is a major threat not only to the health systems but also to patients' lives. Although there is still not enough published statistical data, co-infections in COVID-19 patients found that a significant number of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 developed secondary systemic mycoses that led to serious complications and even death. This review will discuss some of these important findings with the major aim to warn the population about the high risk of concomitant systemic mycoses in individuals weakened by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Mycoses/complications , Opportunistic Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Humans , Invasive Fungal Infections/complications , Invasive Fungal Infections/diagnosis , Invasive Fungal Infections/epidemiology , Invasive Fungal Infections/microbiology , Lung Diseases, Fungal/complications , Lung Diseases, Fungal/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Fungal/epidemiology , Lung Diseases, Fungal/microbiology , Mycoses/diagnosis , Mycoses/epidemiology , Mycoses/microbiology , Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections/epidemiology , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Risk , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Mycopathologia ; 185(4): 599-606, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691142

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has been sweeping across the globe. Based on a retrospective analysis of SARS and influenza data from China and worldwide, we surmise that the fungal co-infections associated with global COVID-19 might be missed or misdiagnosed. Although there are few publications, COVID-19 patients, especially severely ill or immunocompromised, have a higher probability of suffering from invasive mycoses. Aspergillus and Candida infections in COVID-19 patients will require early detection by a comprehensive diagnostic intervention (histopathology, direct microscopic examination, culture, (1,3)-ß-D-glucan, galactomannan, and PCR-based assays) to ensure effective treatments. We suggest it is prudent to assess the risk factors, the types of invasive mycosis, the strengths and limitations of diagnostic methods, clinical settings, and the need for standard or individualized treatment in COVID-19 patients. We provide a clinical flow diagram to assist the clinicians and laboratory experts in the management of aspergillosis, candidiasis, mucormycosis, or cryptococcosis as co-morbidities in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Mycoses/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Candidiasis, Invasive/complications , Candidiasis, Invasive/diagnosis , Candidiasis, Invasive/therapy , China , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Cryptococcosis/complications , Cryptococcosis/diagnosis , Cryptococcosis/therapy , Humans , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/therapy , Mucormycosis/complications , Mucormycosis/diagnosis , Mucormycosis/therapy , Mycoses/diagnosis , Mycoses/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis
16.
Mycopathologia ; 185(4): 607-611, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691056

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic emerged in Wuhan, China, in late 2109, and has rapidly spread around the world. Until May 25, 2020, there were 133,521 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 7359 deaths in Iran. The role of opportunistic fungal infections in the morbidity and mortality of COVID-19 patients remains less defined. Based on our multicenter experiences, we categorized the risks of opportunistic fungal infections in COVID-19 patients in Iran. The COVID-19 patients at high risk included those with acute respiratory distress syndrome, in intensive care units, receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics, immunosuppressants or corticosteroid, and supported by invasive or noninvasive ventilation. The patients were most likely to develop pulmonary aspergillosis, oral candidiasis, or pneumocystis pneumonia. Most diagnoses were probable as the accurate diagnosis of opportunistic fungal infections remains challenging in resource-poor settings. We summarize the clinical signs and laboratory tests needed to confirm candidiasis, aspergillosis, or pneumocystosis in our COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Mycoses/complications , Opportunistic Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Candidiasis, Oral/complications , Candidiasis, Oral/diagnosis , Candidiasis, Oral/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Mycoses/diagnosis , Mycoses/epidemiology , Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pharyngeal Diseases/complications , Pharyngeal Diseases/diagnosis , Pharyngeal Diseases/epidemiology , Pharyngeal Diseases/microbiology , Pneumocystis carinii , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/complications , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/microbiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/complications , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/diagnosis , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/epidemiology
17.
J Infect ; 81(2): 266-275, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-401261

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In previous influenza pandemics, bacterial co-infections have been a major cause of mortality. We aimed to evaluate the burden of co-infections in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We systematically searched Embase, Medline, Cochrane Library, LILACS and CINAHL for eligible studies published from 1 January 2020 to 17 April 2020. We included patients of all ages, in all settings. The main outcome was the proportion of patients with a bacterial, fungal or viral co-infection. . RESULTS: Thirty studies including 3834 patients were included. Overall, 7% of hospitalised COVID-19 patients had a bacterial co-infection (95% CI 3-12%, n=2183, I2=92·2%). A higher proportion of ICU patients had bacterial co-infections than patients in mixed ward/ICU settings (14%, 95% CI 5-26, I2=74·7% versus 4%, 95% CI 1-9, I2= 91·7%). The commonest bacteria were Mycoplasma pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Haemophilus influenzae. The pooled proportion with a viral co-infection was 3% (95% CI 1-6, n=1014, I2=62·3%), with Respiratory Syncytial Virus and influenza A the commonest. Three studies reported fungal co-infections. CONCLUSIONS: A low proportion of COVID-19 patients have a bacterial co-infection; less than in previous influenza pandemics. These findings do not support the routine use of antibiotics in the management of confirmed COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/virology , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Bacterial Infections/complications , Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Mycoses/complications , Mycoses/epidemiology , Mycoses/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Diseases/complications , Virus Diseases/epidemiology , Virus Diseases/microbiology
18.
Virus Res ; 285: 198005, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-261608

ABSTRACT

Accumulating evidence shows that microbial co-infection increases the risk of disease severity in humans. There have been few studies about SARS-CoV-2 co-infection with other pathogens. In this retrospective study, 257 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patients in Jiangsu Province were enrolled from January 22 to February 2, 2020. They were re-confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and tested for 39 respiratory pathogens. In total, 24 respiratory pathogens were found among the patients, and 242 (94.2 %) patients were co-infected with one or more pathogens. Bacterial co-infections were dominant in all COVID-19 patients, Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. The highest and lowest rates of co-infections were found in patients aged 15-44 and below 15, respectively. Most co-infections occurred within 1-4 days of onset of COVID-19 disease. In addition, the proportion of viral co-infections, fungal co-infections and bacterial-fungal co-infections were the highest severe COVID-19 cases. These results will provide a helpful reference for diagnosis and clinical treatment of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/complications , Betacoronavirus , Coinfection , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Mycoses/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Virus Diseases/complications , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Young Adult
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