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1.
Nat Med ; 28(3): 454-455, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1784005
3.
Br J Haematol ; 197(6): 691-696, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714140

ABSTRACT

Data on the response to the COVID-19 vaccine in patients with myeloid malignancy, who are at severe risk in case of infection, have not emerged. In a study of 69 patients with myeloid malignancies, including 46 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and 23 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), anti-spike SARS-CoV-2 antibody titres were measured 3 months after the second mRNA-based vaccination. Seroconversion rates for AML and MDS were 94.7% and 100% respectively, with no significant difference from healthy controls (HCs). Patients with MDS showed a significantly lower antibody titre than that in HCs or AML patients. In AML patients, the antibody titres were comparable to those in HCs when treatment was completed, but lower in patients under maintenance therapy. The response to COVID-19 vaccine appears to be related to disease and treatment status. Patients with myeloid malignancies may be more responsive to vaccines than patients with lymphoid malignancies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute , Myelodysplastic Syndromes , Myeloproliferative Disorders , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/therapy , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/therapy , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
6.
Int J Hematol ; 115(1): 61-68, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432631

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: "Hospital-at-home" (HAH) programs have been shown to optimize resource utilization, shorten hospitalization and prevent nosocomial infection. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed data regarding implementation of an HAH unit for caring patients with hematological malignancies in our center, during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Between January and November 2020, 105 patients were treated in the HAH unit for a total of 204 episodes. Nine patients with multiple myeloma (MM) received autologous HSCT (auto-HSCT). Three patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) received consolidation therapy, 32 patients underwent clinical and analytical monitoring, 20 were transplant recipients early discharged (5 auto-HSCT and 15 allo-HSCT) and 2 had received CART cells therapy. Azacitidine, bortezomib and carfilzomib were administered at home to 54 patients with AML, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or MM. A median of 17 (IQR 13-19) days of admission per patient and a total of 239 visits to the Hematology day-care hospital were avoided. Overall, 28 patients (14% of all episodes) needed admission to the hospital, 4 of them due to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of a Hematology HAH unit was feasible and safe, and provided thorough advanced care to a high-risk population. Advanced care-at-home strategies can be crucial during times of COVID-19 to minimize treatment interruptions and reduce the risk of cross-infections.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Management , Feasibility Studies , Female , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Hospitalization , Humans , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Myeloma/therapy , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Transplantation, Autologous , Young Adult
7.
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol ; 44(2): e474-e478, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232240

ABSTRACT

Thoracic air leak syndromes (TALS) are very rare among the noninfectious pulmonary complications (PCs). They can either be idiopathic or have several risk factors such as allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), graft versus host disease and rarely pulmonary aspergillosis. We present a 14-year-old girl with hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome who developed graft versus host disease on day 60, TALS on day 150, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome on day 300, pulmonary aspergillosis on day 400 and COVID-19 pneumonia on day 575 after allo-HSCT. This is the first report of a child who developed these subsequent PCs after allo-HSCT. Therefore, the manifestations of these unfamiliar PCs like TALS and COVID-19 pneumonia, and concomitant pulmonary aspergillosis with management options are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Graft vs Host Disease/pathology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/pathology , Pulmonary Emphysema/pathology , Adolescent , COVID-19/virology , Female , Graft vs Host Disease/etiology , Humans , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Prognosis , Pulmonary Aspergillosis/etiology , Pulmonary Emphysema/etiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
9.
Transplant Cell Ther ; 27(2): 133-141, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1108496

ABSTRACT

The impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) donor registries and transplant center (TC) practices is underreported. This article reports on the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) Be The Match Registry and its coordinating the provision of unrelated donor (URD) products to domestic and international TCs during the initial 3 months of the COVID-19 pandemic (March through May 2020). Specifically, NMDP data are presented for disease indications for transplant, URD search volumes and availability, graft requests and processing, courier utilization and performance, and conversion rates from formal donor search and workup to graft collection and shipment. Data following the onset of COVID-19 are compared to the immediate 3 months prior to the COVID-19 pandemic (December 2019 through February 2020) and the same quarter 1 year prior to COVID-19 (March through May 2019). During the initial onset of COVID-19 and compared to 1 year prior, TCs requested and the NMDP performed less donor searches. More multiple URD and direct to workup requests were processed by the NMDP, which likely reflected reductions in donor availability. Yet TCs continued to perform allogeneic transplants for acute disease indications like acute leukemia and myelodysplasia, using more cryopreserved grafts than before COVID-19. In comparison to prepandemic patient cycle conversion rates and durations, the NMDP was able to convert patient cycles at nearly the same or higher rates and in similar or shorter periods of time. Last, despite significant challenges caused by the pandemic, including interruptions in domestic courier services and travel restrictions, graft products were delivered to and received by TCs in similar periods of time than before COVID-19. Taken together, these data show that NMDP service line operations continued to function effectively during the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, ensuring requests for and delivery of URD products to domestic and international allogeneic HCT recipients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/therapy , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Unrelated Donors/supply & distribution , Humans , Registries , Transplantation, Homologous
10.
Chest ; 158(4): e139-e142, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-804705

ABSTRACT

Infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 causes severe acute lung injury in approximately 5% of infected adults, but few reports have been made of severe pediatric disease. We present an adolescent patient who contracted severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 one week after a paternal haplo-identical hematopoietic stem cell transplant, with development of severe hyperferritinemic acute lung injury and macrophage activation-like syndrome. We present her case and a comparison of her laboratory data with those of a cohort of pediatric patients with coronavirus disease 2019 without severe disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adolescent , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Female , Humans , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/complications , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Leuk Lymphoma ; 61(12): 2900-2904, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647011

ABSTRACT

The anemia of MDS often results in decreased quality of life, which is invoked to justify red cell transfusions; however, there are sparse data regarding the minimum hemoglobin (Hb) at which it is safe to forgo transfusions for patients with no evidence of end-organ damage. This issue is even more important in the COVID-19 era, where decreases in blood donations have stressed the blood supply. In March 2018, using a modified Delphi method, we convened a panel of 13 expert MDS clinicians for three iterative rounds to discuss a minimum safe Hb for this population. While the panel was unable to reach the pre-set consensus of 75% for a specific Hb threshold, there was 100% consensus that it be no greater than 7.5 g/dL. Our data suggest that, given no end-organ effects of anemia, patients with MDS can safely forgo transfusions with a Hb of 7.5 g/dL or higher.


Subject(s)
Anemia/therapy , Blood Transfusion/standards , Hemoglobins/analysis , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Anemia/diagnosis , Anemia/etiology , Blood Donors , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Decision-Making , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Hematology/standards , Hemoglobins/standards , Humans , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/blood , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/complications , Pandemics/prevention & control , Reference Values , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Tissue and Organ Harvesting/standards
13.
Acta Haematol ; 144(2): 132-145, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-237075

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic poses several challenges to the management of patients with leukemia. The biology of each leukemia and its corresponding treatment with conventional intensive chemotherapy, with or without targeted therapies (venetoclax, FLT3 inhibitors, IDH1/2 inhibitors, Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors), introduce additional layers of complexity during COVID-19 high-risk periods. The knowledge about COVID-19 is accumulating rapidly. An important distinction is the prevalence of "exposure" versus "clinical infectivity," which determine the risk versus benefit of modifying potentially highly curative therapies in leukemia. At present, the rate of clinical infection is <1-2% worldwide. With a mortality rate of 1-5% in CO-VID-19 patients in the general population and potentially of >30% in patients with cancer, careful consideration should be given to the risk of COVID-19 in leukemia. Instead of reducing patient access to specialized cancer centers and modifying therapies to ones with unproven curative benefit, there is more rationale for less intensive, yet effective therapies that may require fewer clinic visits or hospitalizations. Here, we offer recommendations on the optimization of leukemia management during high-risk COVID-19 periods.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Leukemia/complications , Leukemia/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Disease , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Chronic Disease , Humans , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/complications , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/therapy , Myeloproliferative Disorders/complications , Myeloproliferative Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , Risk Factors
14.
Biol Blood Marrow Transplant ; 26(7): 1312-1317, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-208523

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created significant barriers to timely donor evaluation, cell collection, and graft transport for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT). To ensure availability of donor cells on the scheduled date of infusion, many sites now collect cryopreserved grafts before the start of pretransplantation conditioning. Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (ptCY) is an increasingly used approach for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, but the impact of graft cryopreservation on the outcomes of allo-HCT using ptCY is not known. Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) database, we compared the outcomes of HCT using cryopreserved versus fresh grafts in patients undergoing HCT for hematologic malignancy with ptCY. We analyzed 274 patients with hematologic malignancy undergoing allo-HCT between 2013 and 2018 with cryopreserved grafts and ptCY. Eighteen patients received bone marrow grafts and 256 received peripheral blood stem cell grafts. These patients were matched for age, graft type, disease risk index (DRI), and propensity score with 1080 patients who underwent allo-HCT with fresh grafts. The propensity score, which is an assessment of the likelihood of receiving a fresh graft versus a cryopreserved graft, was calculated using logistic regression to account for the following: disease histology, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), HCT Comorbidity Index, conditioning regimen intensity, donor type, and recipient race. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints included acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality (NRM), relapse/progression and disease-free survival (DFS). Because of multiple comparisons, only P values <.01 were considered statistically significant. The 2 cohorts (cryopreserved and fresh) were similar in terms of patient age, KPS, diagnosis, DRI, HCT-CI, donor/graft source, and conditioning intensity. One-year probabilities of OS were 71.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68.3% to 73.8%) with fresh grafts and 70.3% (95% CI, 64.6% to 75.7%) with cryopreserved grafts (P = .81). Corresponding probabilities of OS at 2 years were 60.6% (95% CI, 57.3% to 63.8%) and 58.7% (95% CI, 51.9% to 65.4%) (P = .62). In matched-pair regression analysis, graft cryopreservation was not associated with a significantly higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] for cryopreserved versus fresh, 1.05; 95% CI, .86 to 1.29; P = .60). Similarly, rates of neutrophil recovery (HR, .91; 95% CI, .80 to 1.02; P = .12), platelet recovery (HR, .88; 95% CI, .78 to 1.00; P = .05), grade III-IV acute GVHD (HR, .78; 95% CI, .50 to 1.22; P = .27), NRM (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, .86 to 1.55; P = .32) and relapse/progression (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, .97 to 1.50; P = .09) were similar with cryopreserved grafts versus fresh grafts. There were somewhat lower rates of chronic GVHD (HR, 78; 95% CI, .61 to .99; P = .04) and DFS (HR for treatment failure, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.29; P = .04) with graft cryopreservation that were of marginal statistical significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Overall, our data indicate that graft cryopreservation does not significantly delay hematopoietic recovery, increase the risk of acute GVHD or NRM, or decrease OS after allo-HCT using ptCY.


Subject(s)
Bone Marrow Transplantation/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cryopreservation/methods , Graft vs Host Disease/prevention & control , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Leukemia/therapy , Lymphoma/therapy , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Cyclophosphamide/therapeutic use , Female , Graft vs Host Disease/immunology , Graft vs Host Disease/mortality , Graft vs Host Disease/pathology , Histocompatibility Testing , Humans , Leukemia/immunology , Leukemia/mortality , Leukemia/pathology , Lymphoma/immunology , Lymphoma/mortality , Lymphoma/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/immunology , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/mortality , Myelodysplastic Syndromes/pathology , Pandemics , Siblings , Survival Analysis , Transplantation Conditioning/methods , Transplantation, Homologous , United States/epidemiology , Unrelated Donors/supply & distribution
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