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1.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 372, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493075

ABSTRACT

Varying differentiation of myeloid cells is common in tumors, inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and metabolic diseases. The release of cytokines from myeloid cells is an important driving factor that leads to severe COVID-19 cases and subsequent death. This review briefly summarizes the results of single-cell sequencing of peripheral blood, lung tissue, and cerebrospinal fluid of COVID-19 patients and describes the differentiation trajectory of myeloid cells in patients. Moreover, we describe the function and mechanism of abnormal differentiation of myeloid cells to promote disease progression. Targeting myeloid cell-derived cytokines or checkpoints is essential in developing a combined therapeutic strategy for patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cell Differentiation/immunology , Cellular Microenvironment/immunology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Myeloid Cells/virology , Single-Cell Analysis
2.
Mol Syst Biol ; 17(10): e10387, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478718

ABSTRACT

We need to effectively combine the knowledge from surging literature with complex datasets to propose mechanistic models of SARS-CoV-2 infection, improving data interpretation and predicting key targets of intervention. Here, we describe a large-scale community effort to build an open access, interoperable and computable repository of COVID-19 molecular mechanisms. The COVID-19 Disease Map (C19DMap) is a graphical, interactive representation of disease-relevant molecular mechanisms linking many knowledge sources. Notably, it is a computational resource for graph-based analyses and disease modelling. To this end, we established a framework of tools, platforms and guidelines necessary for a multifaceted community of biocurators, domain experts, bioinformaticians and computational biologists. The diagrams of the C19DMap, curated from the literature, are integrated with relevant interaction and text mining databases. We demonstrate the application of network analysis and modelling approaches by concrete examples to highlight new testable hypotheses. This framework helps to find signatures of SARS-CoV-2 predisposition, treatment response or prioritisation of drug candidates. Such an approach may help deal with new waves of COVID-19 or similar pandemics in the long-term perspective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Factual , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Software , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Computer Graphics , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/immunology , Data Mining/statistics & numerical data , Gene Expression Regulation , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Cellular/drug effects , Immunity, Humoral/drug effects , Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Lymphocytes/drug effects , Lymphocytes/immunology , Lymphocytes/virology , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics , Metabolic Networks and Pathways/immunology , Myeloid Cells/drug effects , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Myeloid Cells/virology , Protein Interaction Mapping , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction , Transcription Factors/genetics , Transcription Factors/immunology , Viral Proteins/genetics , Viral Proteins/immunology
3.
Front Immunol ; 12: 627548, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156119

ABSTRACT

Background: Emerging evidence argues that monocytes, circulating innate immune cells, are principal players in COVID-19 pneumonia. The study aimed to investigate the role of soluble (s)CD163 and sCD14 plasmatic levels in predicting disease severity and characterize peripheral blood monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs), in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia (COVID-19 subjects). Methods: On admission, in COVID-19 subjects sCD163 and sCD14 plasmatic levels, and peripheral blood monocyte and DC subsets were compared to healthy donors (HDs). According to clinical outcome, COVID-19 subjects were divided into ARDS and non-ARDS groups. Results: Compared to HDs, COVID-19 subjects showed higher sCD163 (p<0.0001) and sCD14 (p<0.0001) plasmatic levels. We observed higher sCD163 plasmatic levels in the ARDS group compared to the non-ARDS one (p=0.002). The cut-off for sCD163 plasmatic level greater than 2032 ng/ml was predictive of disease severity (AUC: 0.6786, p=0.0022; sensitivity 56.7% [CI: 44.1-68.4] specificity 73.8% [CI: 58.9-84.7]). Positive correlation between plasmatic levels of sCD163, LDH and IL-6 and between plasmatic levels of sCD14, D-dimer and ferritin were found. Compared to HDs, COVID-19 subjects showed lower percentages of non-classical (p=0.0012) and intermediate monocytes (p=0.0447), slanDCs (p<0.0001), myeloid DCs (mDCs, p<0.0001), and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs, p=0.0014). Compared to the non-ARDS group, the ARDS group showed lower percentages of non-classical monocytes (p=0.0006), mDCs (p=0.0346), and pDCs (p=0.0492). Conclusions: The increase in sCD163 and sCD14 plasmatic levels, observed on hospital admission in COVID-19 subjects, especially in those who developed ARDS, and the correlations of these monocyte/macrophage activation markers with typical inflammatory markers of COVID-19 pneumonia, underline their potential use to assess the risk of progression of the disease. In an early stage of the disease, the assessment of sCD163 plasmatic levels could have clinical utility in predicting the severity of COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Antigens, CD/blood , Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors/blood , Monocytes/immunology , Myeloid Cells/immunology , Receptors, Cell Surface/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/virology , Disease Progression , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Monocytes/virology , Myeloid Cells/metabolism , Myeloid Cells/virology , Patient Admission , Phenotype , Severity of Illness Index , Up-Regulation
5.
Front Immunol ; 11: 1229, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612918

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (Cov)-2, an enveloped virus with a positive-polarity, single-stranded RNA genome. The initial outbreak of the pandemic began in December 2019, and it is affecting the human health of the global community. In common with previous pandemics (Influenza H1N1 and SARS-CoV) and the epidemics of Middle east respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, CoVs target bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. Virus protein ligands (e.g., haemagglutinin or trimeric spike glycoprotein for Influenza and CoV, respectively) interact with cellular receptors, such as (depending on the virus) either sialic acids, Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Host proteases, e.g., cathepsins, furin, or members of the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSP) family, such as Transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2), are involved in virus entry by proteolytically activating virus ligands. Also involved are Toll Like Receptor (TLR) family members, which upregulate anti-viral and pro-inflammatory mediators [interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 and type I and type III Interferons among others], through the activation of Nuclear Factor (NF)-kB. When these events (virus cellular entry and innate immune responses) are uncontrolled, a deleterious systemic response is sometimes encountered in infected patients, leading to the well-described "cytokine storm" and an ensuing multiple organ failure promoted by a downregulation of dendritic cell, macrophage, and T-cell function. We aim to describe how the lung and systemic host innate immune responses affect survival either positively, through downregulating initial viral load, or negatively, by triggering uncontrolled inflammation. An emphasis will be put on host cellular signaling pathways and proteases involved with a view on tackling these therapeutically.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Immunity, Innate , Lung/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Signal Transduction , Animals , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Drug Delivery Systems , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Lung/virology , Mice , Myeloid Cells/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Receptors, Coronavirus , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Proteases/metabolism , Virus Internalization
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