Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 94
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Arch Cardiovasc Dis ; 115(1): 37-47, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561396

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Concomitant or cured coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) may lead to difficulties in acute care management and impair prognosis. AIMS: To describe and compare the characteristics, care management and 90-day post discharge outcomes of patients hospitalized for MI who did not have COVID-19 with those of patients with concomitant or previous hospital-diagnosed COVID-19. METHODS: This population-based French study included all patients hospitalized for MI in France (30 December 2019 to 04 October 2020) from the French National Health Data System. Outcomes were described for each COVID-19 group and compared using adjusted logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Among 55,524 patients hospitalized for MI, 135 had previous hospital-diagnosed COVID-19 and 329 had concomitant COVID-19. Patients with previous hospital-diagnosed COVID-19 had more personal history of cardiovascular diseases than those without concomitant/previous confirmed COVID-19. In-hospital and 90-day post discharge mortality rates of patients with previous COVID-19 were 8.1% and 4.0%, respectively, compared with 3.5% and 3.0% in patients without concomitant/previous confirmed COVID-19 (odds ratio [OR]adjin-hospital 1.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.97-3.46; ORadjpostdischarge 0.77, 95% CI 0.28-2.13). Patients with concomitant COVID-19 had more personal history of cardiovascular diseases, but also a poorer prognosis than their no concomitant/no previous confirmed COVID-19 counterparts; they presented excess cardiac complications during hospitalization (ORadj 1.62, 95% CI 1.29-2.04), in-hospital mortality (ORadj 3.31, 95% CI 2.32-4.72) and 90-day post discharge mortality (ORadj 2.09, 95% CI 1.24-3.51). CONCLUSIONS: In-hospital and 90-day post discharge mortality of patients hospitalized for MI who had previous hospital-diagnosed COVID-19 did not seem to differ from those hospitalized for MI alone. Conversely, concomitant COVID-19 and MI carried a poorer prognosis extending beyond the hospital stay. Special attention should be given to patients with simultaneous COVID-19 and MI, in terms of acute care and secondary prevention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Aftercare , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(12)2021 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542659

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives: early reports showed a decrease in admission rates and an increase in mortality of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic. We sought to investigate whether the COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdown had an impact on the ischemia time and prognosis of patients suffering from AMI in the settings of low COVID-19 burden. Materials and Methods: we conducted a retrospective data analysis from a tertiary center in Lithuania of 818 patients with AMI. Data were collected from 1 March to 30 June in 2020 during the peri-lockdown period (2020 group; n = 278) and compared to the same period last year (2019 group; n = 326). The primary study endpoint was all-cause mortality during 3 months of follow-up. Secondary endpoints were heart failure severity (Killip class) on admission and ischemia time in patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Results: there was a reduction of 14.7% in admission rate for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during the peri-lockdown period. The 3-month mortality rate did not differ significantly (6.9% in 2020 vs. 10.5% in 2019, p = 0.341 for STEMI patients; 5.3% in 2020 vs. 2.6% in 2019, p = 0.374 for patients with acute myocardial infarction without ST segment elevation (NSTEMI)). More STEMI patients presented with Killip IV class in 2019 (13.5% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.043, respectively). There was an increase of door-to-PCI time (54.0 [42.0-86.0] in 2019; 63.5 [48.3-97.5] in 2020, p = 0.018) and first medical contact (FMC)-to-PCI time (101.0 [82.5-120.8] in 2019; 115 [97.0-154.5] in 2020, p = 0.01) during the pandemic period. Conclusions: There was a 14.7% reduction of admissions for AMI during the first wave of COVID-19. FMC-to-PCI time increased during the peri-lockdown period, however, it did not translate into worse survival during follow-up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
5.
Hamostaseologie ; 41(5): 356-364, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483185

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular manifestations are frequent in COVID-19 infection and are predictive of adverse outcomes. Elevated cardiac biomarkers are common findings in patients with cardiovascular comorbidities and severe COVID-19 infection. Troponin, inflammatory and thrombotic markers may also improve risk prediction in COVID-19. In our comprehensive review, we provide an overview of the incidence, potential mechanisms and outcome of acute cardiac injury in COVID-19. Thereby, we discuss coagulation abnormalities in sepsis and altered immune response as contributing factors favoring myocardial injury. We further highlight the role of endothelial damage in the pathophysiological concepts. Finally, observational studies addressing the incidence of myocardial infarction during COVID-19 pandemic are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Injuries/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Heart Injuries/blood , Heart Injuries/mortality , Humans , Incidence , Models, Cardiovascular , Myocardial Infarction/blood , Myocardial Infarction/mortality , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Troponin/blood
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(18)2021 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430865

ABSTRACT

A marked decline in myocardial infarction (AMI) hospitalizations was observed worldwide during the COVID-19 outbreak. The pandemic may have generated fear and adverse psychological consequences in these patients, delaying hospital access. The main objective of the study was to assess COVID fear through the FCV-19S questionnaire (a self-report measure of seven items) in 69 AMI patients (65 ± 11 years, mean ± SD; 59 males). Females presented higher values of each FCV-19S item than males. Older subjects (>57 years, 25th percentile) showed a higher total score with respect to those in the first quartile. The percentage of patients who responded "agree" and "strongly agree" in item 4 ("I am afraid of losing my life because of the coronavirus") and 3 ("My hands become clammy when I think about the coronavirus") was significantly greater in the elderly than in younger patients. When cardiovascular (CV) patients were compared to a previously published general Italian population, patients with CV disease exhibited higher values for items 3 and 4. Measures should be put in place to assist vulnerable and high CV risk patients, possibly adding psychologists to the cardiology team.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear , Female , Humans , Male , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Eur J Clin Invest ; 51(11): e13679, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405172

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has a wide spectrum of cardiovascular sequelae including myocarditis and pericarditis; however, the prevalence and clinical impact are unclear. We investigated the prevalence of new-onset myocarditis/pericarditis and associated adverse cardiovascular events in patients with COVID-19. METHODS AND RESULTS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using electronic medical records from a global federated health research network. Patients were included based on a diagnosis of COVID-19 and new-onset myocarditis or pericarditis. Patients with COVID-19 and myocarditis/pericarditis were 1:1 propensity score matched for age, sex, race and comorbidities to patients with COVID-19 but without myocarditis/pericarditis. The outcomes of interest were 6-month all-cause mortality, hospitalisation, cardiac arrest, incident heart failure, incident atrial fibrillation and acute myocardial infarction, comparing patients with and without myocarditis/pericarditis. Of 718,365 patients with COVID-19, 35,820 (5.0%) developed new-onset myocarditis and 10,706 (1.5%) developed new-onset pericarditis. Six-month all-cause mortality was 3.9% (n = 702) in patients with myocarditis and 2.9% (n = 523) in matched controls (p < .0001), odds ratio 1.36 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21-1.53). Six-month all-cause mortality was 15.5% (n = 816) for pericarditis and 6.7% (n = 356) in matched controls (p < .0001), odds ratio 2.55 (95% CI: 2.24-2.91). Receiving critical care was associated with significantly higher odds of mortality for patients with myocarditis and pericarditis. Patients with pericarditis seemed to associate with more new-onset cardiovascular sequelae than those with myocarditis. This finding was consistent when looking at pre-COVID-19 data with pneumonia patients. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COVID-19 who present with myocarditis/pericarditis associate with increased odds of major adverse events and new-onset cardiovascular sequelae.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Heart Arrest/epidemiology , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Mortality , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocarditis/epidemiology , Pericarditis/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Cause of Death , Cohort Studies , Critical Care , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Myocarditis/complications , Pericarditis/complications , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology
9.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 217, 2021 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388810

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The viral load of asymptomatic SAR-COV-2 positive (ASAP) persons has been equal to that of symptomatic patients. On the other hand, there are no reports of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) outcomes in ASAP patients. Therefore, we evaluated thrombus burden and thrombus viral load and their impact on microvascular bed perfusion in the infarct area (myocardial blush grade, MBG) in ASAP compared to SARS-COV-2 negative (SANE) STEMI patients. METHODS: This was an observational study of 46 ASAP, and 130 SANE patients admitted with confirmed STEMI treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention and thrombus aspiration. The primary endpoints were thrombus dimension + thrombus viral load effects on MBG after PPCI. The secondary endpoints during hospitalization were major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs). MACEs are defined as a composite of cardiovascular death, nonfatal acute AMI, and heart failure during hospitalization. RESULTS: In the study population, ASAP vs. SANE showed a significant greater use of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors and of heparin (p < 0.05), and a higher thrombus grade 5 and thrombus dimensions (p < 0.05). Interestingly, ASAP vs. SANE patients had lower MBG and left ventricular function (p < 0.001), and 39 (84.9%) of ASAP patients had thrombus specimens positive for SARS-COV-2. After PPCI, a MBG 2-3 was present in only 26.1% of ASAP vs. 97.7% of SANE STEMI patients (p < 0.001). Notably, death and nonfatal AMI were higher in ASAP vs. SANE patients (p < 0.05). Finally, in ASAP STEMI patients the thrombus viral load was a significant determinant of thrombus dimension independently of risk factors (p < 0.005). Thus, multiple logistic regression analyses evidenced that thrombus SARS-CoV-2 infection and dimension were significant predictors of poorer MBG in STEMI patients. Intriguingly, in ASAP patients the female vs. male had higher thrombus viral load (15.53 ± 4.5 vs. 30.25 ± 5.51 CT; p < 0.001), and thrombus dimension (4.62 ± 0.44 vs 4.00 ± 1.28 mm2; p < 0.001). ASAP vs. SANE patients had a significantly lower in-hospital survival for MACE following PPCI (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In ASAP patients presenting with STEMI, there is strong evidence towards higher thrombus viral load, dimension, and poorer MBG. These data support the need to reconsider ASAP status as a risk factor that may worsen STEMI outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Coronary Thrombosis/virology , Heart/physiopathology , Microcirculation/physiology , Myocardial Infarction/physiopathology , Aged , Analysis of Variance , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Coronary Angiography/methods , Coronary Thrombosis/epidemiology , Echocardiography/methods , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology
10.
Eur Heart J Qual Care Clin Outcomes ; 7(5): 438-446, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377964

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To evaluate the acute and chronic patterns of myocardial injury among patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), and their mid-term outcomes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 who had a hospital encounter within the Mount Sinai Health System (New York City) between 27 February 2020 and 15 October 2020 were evaluated for inclusion. Troponin levels assessed between 72 h before and 48 h after the COVID-19 diagnosis were used to stratify the study population by the presence of acute and chronic myocardial injury, as defined by the Fourth Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction. Among 4695 patients, those with chronic myocardial injury (n = 319, 6.8%) had more comorbidities, including chronic kidney disease and heart failure, while acute myocardial injury (n = 1168, 24.9%) was more associated with increased levels of inflammatory markers. Both types of myocardial injury were strongly associated with impaired survival at 6 months [chronic: hazard ratio (HR) 4.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.44-5.06; acute: HR 4.72, 95% CI 4.14-5.36], even after excluding events occurring in the first 30 days (chronic: HR 3.97, 95% CI 2.15-7.33; acute: HR 4.13, 95% CI 2.75-6.21). The mortality risk was not significantly different in patients with acute as compared with chronic myocardial injury (HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.94-1.36), except for a worse prognostic impact of acute myocardial injury in patients <65 years of age (P-interaction = 0.043) and in those without coronary artery disease (P-interaction = 0.041). CONCLUSION: Chronic and acute myocardial injury represent two distinctive patterns of cardiac involvement among COVID-19 patients. While both types of myocardial injury are associated with impaired survival at 6 months, mortality rates peak in the early phase of the infection but remain elevated even beyond 30 days during the convalescent phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Myocardial Infarction/blood , Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Troponin/analysis , Acute Disease/epidemiology , Acute Disease/mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Chronic Disease/mortality , Comorbidity , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Female , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/mortality , New York City/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Prognosis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
11.
Dtsch Arztebl Int ; 118(26): 447-453, 2021 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360700

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The phenomenon of declining numbers of patients presenting with myocardial infarction was reported from the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic onward. It was thought that measures introduced to stem the pandemic, such as the lockdown, contributed to this development. However, the data on hospital admissions, delay times, and mortality are not consistent. METHODS: Our systematic literature review and meta-analysis embraced studies reporting the number of hospital admissions of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and/or non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) during lockdown episodes. We also collected data on patient- and system-related delay times and on mortality. RESULTS: Data from 27 studies on a total of 81 163 patients were included in our meta-analysis. We found that the number of hospital admissions of patients with myocardial infarction was significantly lower during the lockdown than before the pandemic (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.516 [0.403; 0.660], I2 = 98%). This was true both for patients with STEMI (IRR = 0.620 [0.514; 0.746], I2 = 96%) and for patients with NSTEMI (IRR = 0.454 [0.354; 0.584], I2 = 96%). However, we found no significant difference in the time from hospital admission to cardiac catheterization, or in mortality, in relation to the time from symptom onset to first medical contact. CONCLUSION: In this study, we have shown that the lockdown due to COVID-19 was associated with a marked decline in the number of hospital admissions of patients with myocardial infarction. As no significant effect on delay times or mortality was observed, it seems that timely medical care continued to be delivered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Am J Cardiol ; 157: 42-47, 2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356116

ABSTRACT

Cardiac involvement in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been established. This is manifested by troponin elevation and associated with worse patient prognosis. We evaluated whether patient outcomes improved as experience accumulated during the pandemic. We analyzed COVID-19-positive patients with myocardial injury (defined as troponin elevation) who presented to the MedStar Health system (11 hospitals in Washington, DC, and Maryland) during the "Early Phase" of the pandemic (March 1 - June 30, 2020) and compared their characteristics and outcomes to the COVID-19-positive patients with the presence of troponin elevation in the "Later Phase" of the pandemic (October 1, 2020 - January 31, 2021). The cohort included 788 COVID-19-positive admitted patients for whom troponin was elevated, 167 during the "Early Phase" and 621 during the "Later Phase." Maximum troponin-I in the "Early Phase" was 13.46±34.72 ng/mL versus 11.21±20.57 ng/mL in the "Later Phase" (p = 0.553). In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in the "Later Phase" (50.3% vs. 24.6%; p<0.001), as were incidence of intensive-care-unit admission (77.8% vs. 46.1%; p<0.001) and need for mechanical ventilation (61.7% versus 28%; p<0.001). In addition, more "Early Phase" patients underwent coronary angiography (6% vs. 2.3%; p=0.013). Finally, 3% of "Early Phase" and 0.8% of "Later Phase" patients underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (p=0.025). In conclusion, treatment outcomes have significantly improved since the beginning of the pandemic in COVID-19-positive patients with troponin elevation. This may be attributed to awareness, severity of the disease, improvements in therapies, and provider experience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Troponin I/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Clinical Competence , Cohort Studies , Coronary Angiography/statistics & numerical data , District of Columbia/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Maryland/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data
13.
Lancet ; 398(10300): 599-607, 2021 08 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331303

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is a complex disease targeting many organs. Previous studies highlight COVID-19 as a probable risk factor for acute cardiovascular complications. We aimed to quantify the risk of acute myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke associated with COVID-19 by analysing all COVID-19 cases in Sweden. METHODS: This self-controlled case series (SCCS) and matched cohort study was done in Sweden. The personal identification numbers of all patients with COVID-19 in Sweden from Feb 1 to Sept 14, 2020, were identified and cross-linked with national inpatient, outpatient, cancer, and cause of death registers. The controls were matched on age, sex, and county of residence in Sweden. International Classification of Diseases codes for acute myocardial infarction or ischaemic stroke were identified in causes of hospital admission for all patients with COVID-19 in the SCCS and all patients with COVID-19 and the matched control individuals in the matched cohort study. The SCCS method was used to calculate the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for first acute myocardial infarction or ischaemic stroke following COVID-19 compared with a control period. The matched cohort study was used to determine the increased risk that COVID-19 confers compared with the background population of increased acute myocardial infarction or ischaemic stroke in the first 2 weeks following COVID-19. FINDINGS: 86 742 patients with COVID-19 were included in the SCCS study, and 348 481 matched control individuals were also included in the matched cohort study. When day of exposure was excluded from the risk period in the SCCS, the IRR for acute myocardial infarction was 2·89 (95% CI 1·51-5·55) for the first week, 2·53 (1·29-4·94) for the second week, and 1·60 (0·84-3·04) in weeks 3 and 4 following COVID-19. When day of exposure was included in the risk period, IRR was 8·44 (5·45-13·08) for the first week, 2·56 (1·31-5·01) for the second week, and 1·62 (0·85-3·09) for weeks 3 and 4 following COVID-19. The corresponding IRRs for ischaemic stroke when day of exposure was excluded from the risk period were 2·97 (1·71-5·15) in the first week, 2·80 (1·60-4·88) in the second week, and 2·10 (1·33-3·32) in weeks 3 and 4 following COVID-19; when day of exposure was included in the risk period, the IRRs were 6·18 (4·06-9·42) for the first week, 2·85 (1·64-4·97) for the second week, and 2·14 (1·36-3·38) for weeks 3 and 4 following COVID-19. In the matched cohort analysis excluding day 0, the odds ratio (OR) for acute myocardial infarction was 3·41 (1·58-7·36) and for stroke was 3·63 (1·69-7·80) in the 2 weeks following COVID-19. When day 0 was included in the matched cohort study, the OR for acute myocardial infarction was 6·61 (3·56-12·20) and for ischaemic stroke was 6·74 (3·71-12·20) in the 2 weeks following COVID-19. INTERPRETATION: Our findings suggest that COVID-19 is a risk factor for acute myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke. This indicates that acute myocardial infarction and ischaemic stroke represent a part of the clinical picture of COVID-19, and highlights the need for vaccination against COVID-19. FUNDING: Central ALF-funding and Base Unit ALF-Funding, Region Västerbotten, Sweden; Strategic funding during 2020 from the Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University, Sweden; Stroke Research in Northern Sweden; The Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Adult , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Registries , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sweden/epidemiology
14.
Indian Heart J ; 73(5): 565-571, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1312426

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence and impact of respiratory infections in cardiogenic shock complicating acute myocardial infarction (AMI-CS). METHODS: Using the National Inpatient Sample (2000-2017), this study identified adult (≥18 years) admitted with AMI-CS complicated by respiratory infections. Outcomes of interest included in-hospital mortality of AMI-CS admissions with and without respiratory infections, hospitalization costs, hospital length of stay, and discharge disposition. Temporal trends of prevalence, in-hospital mortality and cardiac procedures were evaluated. RESULTS: Among 557,974 AMI-CS admissions, concomitant respiratory infections were identified in 84,684 (15.2%). Temporal trends revealed a relatively stable trend in prevalence of respiratory infections over the 18-year period. Admissions with respiratory infections were on average older, less likely to be female, with greater comorbidity, had significantly higher rates of NSTEMI presentation, and acute non-cardiac organ failure compared to those without respiratory infections (all p < 0.001). These admissions received lower rates of coronary angiography (66.8% vs 69.4%, p < 0.001) and percutaneous coronary interventions (44.8% vs 49.5%, p < 0.001), with higher rates of mechanical circulatory support, pulmonary artery catheterization, and invasive mechanical ventilation compared to AMI-CS admissions without respiratory infections (all p < 0.001). The in-hospital mortality was lower among AMI-CS admissions with respiratory infections (31.6% vs 38.4%, adjusted OR 0.58 [95% CI 0.57-0.59], p < 0.001). Admissions with respiratory infections had longer lengths of hospital stay (127-20 vs 63-11 days, p < 0.001), higher hospitalization costs and less frequent discharges to home (27.1% vs 44.7%, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Respiratory infections in AMI-CS admissions were associated with higher resource utilization but lower in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Respiratory Tract Infections , Adult , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Respiratory Tract Infections/complications , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Shock, Cardiogenic/epidemiology , Shock, Cardiogenic/etiology , Shock, Cardiogenic/therapy
15.
Curr Atheroscler Rep ; 23(9): 49, 2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323961

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The syndrome of myocardial infarction in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease (MINOCA) is not uncommon and has multiple potential coronary etiologies. With the use of more sensitive cardiac biomarkers and advanced cardiovascular imaging, MINOCA presentations have gain increasing attention among researchers and cardiologists. Despite the presence of a myocardial infarction and elevated future risk, many patients are sent home with little or no cardio-protective treatment and no explanation for their symptoms. In this review, we emphasized the importance of MINOCA treatment based on the underlying etiology. RECENT FINDINGS: As there are multiple pathophysiological mechanisms potentially involved in MINOCA, it should be considered a working diagnosis until there is a better understanding regarding the underlying cause. It is critical to use multimodality imaging when treating patients with MINOCA to help determine the underlying etiology and rule out mimics of MINOCA, so that therapies appropriate to the etiology can be provided. A more systematic approach to managing patients with MINOCA should result in better treatment and an improved prognosis for these patients.


Subject(s)
Coronary Artery Disease , Myocardial Infarction , Coronary Angiography , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnosis , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Coronary Vessels , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Risk Factors
18.
Ann Biol Clin (Paris) ; 79(3): 219-231, 2021 06 01.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315903

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 is responsible for myocardial injury in many infected patients, which is associated with severe disease and critical illness. The mechanisms by which SARS-CoV-2 may cause myocardial damage involve direct effect of the virus in cardiac cells and indirect effect due to the clinical consequences of Covid-19. Cardiomyocytes are well known to express Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme-2 receptors (ACE-2) to facilitate the virus cell entry, which could explain the occurrence of myocarditis, functional alterations in the myocardium, and more rarely, myocardial infarction. Myocardial injury may also be secondary to systemic inflammation or coagulopathy due to complicated Covid-19. The existence of a cardio-intestinal axis with alteration of tryptophan metabolism in the small bowel leading first to colitis and then to systemic inflammation has also been evoked to explain the myocardial injury. Morphological and metabolic disturbances of the heart during the Covid-19 are associated with elevated concentrations of cardiac blood biomarkers, mainly troponins and natriuretic peptides. The determination of these biomarkers has proven to be very useful for diagnosis, prognosis, and risk stratification. Indeed, recent data demonstrated that about 20% of infected patients admitted to the hospital have elevated troponin or BNP levels, and Covid-19 patients with elevated troponin concentrations beyond the diagnostic threshold (99th percentile) were associated with a higher risk of in-hospital mortality. In conclusion, after more than a year of a unique global pandemic, it is now clearly established that myocardial injury during Covid-19 is frequent and strongly contributes to the severity of the disease. Cardiac alterations secondary to direct infection of cardiac cells by SARS-CoV-2 or to the clinical consequences of Covid-19 are associated with elevated levels of cardiac biomarkers in blood, whose measurement is crucial in clinical decision making.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , Endocarditis/diagnosis , Myocardium/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/analysis , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Endocarditis/epidemiology , Endocarditis/virology , Female , France/epidemiology , Heart/virology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/metabolism , Myocardial Infarction/virology , Pandemics , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
19.
Intern Med J ; 51(8): 1328-1331, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295025

ABSTRACT

During the first months of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in early 2020, Google Trends data in the United States showed a strong increase in search query frequency for chest pain symptoms despite a concurrent decrease in search interest for myocardial infarction. This suggests a reduced attention to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and chest pain as its main symptom during this time period. These observations could help explain why cardiovascular mortality rose dramatically despite a strong decrease in hospitalisation rates for ACS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Search Engine , United States/epidemiology
20.
Indian Heart J ; 73(4): 413-423, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275353

ABSTRACT

AIM: Studies on the changes in the presentation and management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during the COVID-19 pandemic from low- and middle-income countries are limited. We sought to determine the changes in the number of admissions, management practices, and outcomes of AMI during the pandemic period in India. METHODS & RESULTS: In this two-timepoint cross-sectional study involving 187 hospitals across India, patients admitted with AMI between 15th March to 15th June in 2020 were compared with those admitted during the corresponding period of 2019. We included 41,832 consecutive adults with AMI. Admissions during the pandemic period (n = 16414) decreased by 35·4% as compared to the corresponding period in 2019 (n = 25418). We observed significant heterogeneity in this decline across India. The weekly average decrease in AMI admissions in 2020 correlated negatively with the number of COVID cases (r = -0·48; r2 = 0·2), but strongly correlated with the stringency of lockdown index (r = 0·95; r2 = 0·90). On a multi-level logistic regression, admissions were lower in 2020 with older age categories, tier 1 cities, and centers with high patient volume. Adjusted utilization rate of coronary angiography, and percutaneous coronary intervention decreased by 11·3%, and 5·9% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The magnitude of reduction in AMI admissions across India was not uniform. The nature, time course, and the patient demographics were different compared to reports from other countries, suggesting a significant impact due to the lockdown. These findings have important implications in managing AMI during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Pandemics , Stroke Volume , Ventricular Function, Left
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...