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2.
Int J Qual Health Care ; 35(2)2023 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236963

ABSTRACT

Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) treatment requires timely diagnosis and treatment for optimal health outcomes. The Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused changes in health-care delivery and utilization; therefore, the present study explored the changes in emergency care quality indicators for patients with AMI before and during different periods of government response to the COVID-19 outbreak in Taiwan. The Taiwan Clinical Performance Indicators database was used to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on acute care quality indicators for patients with AMI during four periods: before the COVID-19 outbreak (Period I-1 January to 31 December 2019) and during three periods in which the central government imposed different levels of epidemic prevention and response alerts (Period II-1 January 2020 to 30 April 2021; Period III-1 May to 31 July 2021; and Period IV-1 August to 31 December 2021). A 15.9% decrease in monthly emergency department admission for patients with AMI occurred during Period III. The hospital 'door-to-electrocardiogram time being <10 min' indicator attainment was significantly lower during Periods III and IV. The attainment of 'dual antiplatelet therapy received within 6 hr of emergency department arrival' indicator improved in Period IV, whereas 'the primary percutaneous coronary intervention being received within 90 min of hospital arrival' indicator significantly decreased during Periods III and IV. The indicator 'in-hospital mortality' was unchanged within the study duration. Overall, the quality of care for patients with AMI was mildly influenced during the assessed pandemic periods, especially in terms of door-to-electrocardiogram time of <10 min and primary percutaneous coronary intervention received within 90 min of hospital arrival (Period III). Using our study results, hospitals can develop strategies regarding care delivery for patients with AMI during a COVID-19 outbreak on the basis of central government alert levels, even during the height of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Taiwan/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods
3.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1151506, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319457

ABSTRACT

Background: Although acute myocardial infarction (AMI) requires timely intervention, limited nationwide data is available regarding the association between disruption of emergency services and outcomes of patients with AMI during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Moreover, whether diabetes mellitus (DM) adversely affects disease severity in these patients has not yet been investigated. Methods: This nationwide population-based study analyzed 45,648 patients with AMI, using data from the national registry of emergency departments (ED) in Korea. Frequency of ED visits and disease severity were compared between the COVID-19 outbreak period (year 2020) and the control period (the previous year 2019). Results: The number of ED visits by patients with AMI decreased during the first, second, and third waves of the outbreak period compared to the corresponding time period in the control period (all p-values < 0.05). A longer duration from symptom onset to ED visit (p = 0.001) and ED stay (p = 0.001) and higher rates of resuscitation, ventilation care, and extracorporeal membrane oxygen insertion were observed during the outbreak period than during the control period (all p-values < 0.05). These findings were exacerbated in patients with comorbid DM; Compared to patients without DM, patients with DM demonstrated delayed ED visits, longer ED stays, more intensive care unit admissions (p < 0.001), longer hospitalizations (p < 0.001), and higher rates of resuscitation, intubation, and hemodialysis (all p-values < 0.05) during the outbreak period. While in-hospital mortality was similar in AMI patients with and without comorbid DM during the two periods (4.3 vs. 4.4%; p = 0.671), patients with DM who had other comorbidities such as chronic kidney disease or heart failure or were aged ≥ 80 years had higher in-hospital mortality compared with those without any of the comorbidities (3.1 vs. 6.0%; p < 0.001). Conclusion: During the pandemic, the number of patients with AMI presenting to the ED decreased compared with that of the previous year, while the disease severity increased, particularly in patients with comorbid DM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Emergency Medical Services , Myocardial Infarction , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology
4.
Int J Qual Health Care ; 35(2)2023 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316447

ABSTRACT

The COVID -19 pandemic impacted acute myocardial infarction (AMI) attendances, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treatments, and outcomes. We collated data from majority of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI)-capable public healthcare centres in Singapore to understand the initial impact COVID-19 had on essential time-critical emergency services. We present data comparisons from 'Before Disease Outbreak Response System Condition (DORSCON) Orange', 'DORSCON Orange to start of circuit breaker (CB)', and during the first month of 'CB'. We collected aggregate numbers of weekly elective PCI from four centres and AMI admissions, PPCI, and in-hospital mortality from five centres. Exact door-to-balloon (DTB) times were recorded for one centre; another two reported proportions of DTB times exceeding targets. Median weekly elective PCI cases significantly decreased from 'Before DORSCON Orange' to 'DORSCON Orange to start of CB' (34 vs 22.5, P = 0.013). Median weekly STEMI admissions and PPCI did not change significantly. In contrast, the median weekly non-STEMI (NSTEMI) admissions decreased significantly from 'Before DORSCON Orange' to 'DORSCON Orange to start of CB' (59 vs 48, P = 0.005) and were sustained during CB (39 cases). Exact DTB times reported by one centre showed no significant change in the median. Out of three centres, two reported significant increases in the proportion that exceeded DTB targets. In-hospital mortality rates remained static. In Singapore, STEMI and PPCI rates remained stable, while NSTEMI rates decreased during DORSCON Orange and CB. The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) experience may have helped prepare us to maintain essential services such as PPCI during periods of acute healthcare resource strain. However, data must be monitored and increased pandemic preparedness measures must be explored to ensure that AMI care is not adversely affected by continued COVID fluctuations and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Pandemics , Singapore/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Treatment Outcome , Retrospective Studies
6.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 22(1): 473, 2022 11 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2277245

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) has emerged as an increasingly diagnosed cause of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), which is easily missed or delayed. The effective use of coronary angiography (CAG) and advanced intracoronary imaging examinations in STEMI patients has led to increased detection of SCAD. CASE PRESENTATION: A 59-year-old woman with acute angina pectoris was diagnosed with STEMI detected by electrocardiography combined with measurement of myocardial enzymes. Due to the ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan, she was first given thrombolytic therapy after excluding contraindications according to the requirements of the current consensus statement; however, subsequently, both the symptoms of ongoing chest pain and the electrocardiographic results indicated the failure of thrombolytic therapy, so the intervention team administered rescue percutaneous coronary intervention treatment under third-grade protection. CAG confirmed total occlusion in the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery, with thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) 0 flow, whereas the left circumflex and right coronary arteries appeared normal, with TIMI 3 flow. Intravenous ultrasound (IVUS) was further performed to investigate the causes of occlusion, which verified the absence of atherosclerosis but detected SCAD with intramural haematoma. During the operation, the guidewire reached the distal end of the LAD artery smoothly, the balloon was dilated slightly, and the reflow of TIMI blood could be seen by repeated CAG. During the follow-up period of one and a half years, the patient complained of occasional, slight chest tightness. The repeated CAG showed that the spontaneous dissection in the LAD artery had healed well, with TIMI 3 flow. The repeated IVUS confirmed that the SCAD and intramural haematoma had been mostly resorbed and repaired. CONCLUSION: This was a case of failed STEMI thrombolysis in our hospital during the outbreak of COVID-19. This case indicates that doctors need to consider the cause of the disease when treating STEMI patients, especially patients without traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Moreover, CAG and intracoronary imaging examinations should be actively performed to identify the aetiology and improve the treatment success rate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Coronary Angiography/adverse effects , Thrombolytic Therapy/adverse effects , Hematoma/complications
7.
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes ; 16(5): e009652, 2023 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261935

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has evolved through multiple phases characterized by new viral variants, vaccine development, and changes in therapies. It is unknown whether rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profiles and complications have changed over time. METHODS: We analyzed the American Heart Association COVID-19 CVD registry, a national multicenter registry of hospitalized adults with active COVID-19 infection. The time period from April 2020 to December 2021 was divided into 3-month epochs, with March 2020 analyzed separately as a potential outlier. Participating centers varied over the study period. Trends in all-cause in-hospital mortality, CVD risk factors, and in-hospital CVD outcomes, including a composite primary outcome of cardiovascular death, cardiogenic shock, new heart failure, stroke, and myocardial infarction, were evaluated across time epochs. Risk-adjusted analyses were performed using generalized linear mixed-effects models. RESULTS: A total of 46 007 patient admissions from 134 hospitals were included (mean patient age 61.8 years, 53% male, 22% Black race). Patients admitted later in the pandemic were younger, more likely obese, and less likely to have existing CVD (Ptrend ≤0.001 for each). The incidence of the primary outcome increased from 7.0% in March 2020 to 9.8% in October to December 2021 (risk-adjusted Ptrend=0.006). This was driven by an increase in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction and stroke (Ptrend<0.0001 for each). The overall rate of in-hospital mortality was 14.2%, which declined over time (20.8% in March 2020 versus 10.8% in the last epoch; adjusted Ptrend<0.0001). When the analysis was restricted to July 2020 to December 2021, no temporal change in all-cause mortality was seen (adjusted Ptrend=0.63). CONCLUSIONS: Despite a shifting risk factor profile toward a younger population with lower rates of established CVD, the incidence of diagnosed cardiovascular complications of COVID increased from the onset of the pandemic through December 2021. All-cause mortality decreased during the initial months of the pandemic and thereafter remained consistently high through December 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Myocardial Infarction , Stroke , Adult , United States/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Female , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Risk Factors , Pandemics , American Heart Association , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Registries , Hospital Mortality , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Heart Disease Risk Factors
8.
Heart Fail Clin ; 19(2): 221-229, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2261444

ABSTRACT

The global health crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has evolved rapidly to overburden health care organizations around the world and has resulted in significant morbidity and mortality. Many countries have reported a substantial and rapid reduction in hospital admissions for acute coronary syndromes and percutaneous coronary intervention. The reasons for such abrupt changes in health care delivery are multifactorial and include lockdowns, reduction in outpatient services, reluctance to seek medical attention for fear of contracting the virus, and restrictive visitation policies adopted during the pandemic. This review discusses the impact of COVID-19 on important aspects of acute MI care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Pandemics , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data
10.
Heart Fail Clin ; 19(2): 241-249, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2256184

ABSTRACT

The aggressive inflammatory response to COVID-19 can result in airway damage, respiratory failure, cardiac injury, and multiorgan failure, which lead to death in susceptible patients. Cardiac injury and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) secondary to COVID-19 disease can lead to hospitalization, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. When serious collateral damage from tissue necrosis or bleeding occurs, mechanical complications of myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock can ensue. While prompt reperfusion therapies have decreased the incidence of these serious complications, patients who present late following the initial infarct are at increased for mechanical complications, cardiogenic shock, and death. The health outcomes for patients with mechanical complications are dismal if not recognized and treated promptly. Even if they survive serious pump failure, their CICU stay is often prolonged, and their index hospitalization and follow-up visits may consume significant resources and impact the health care system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Shock, Cardiogenic , COVID-19/complications , Myocardial Infarction/complications , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Death, Sudden, Cardiac
12.
Am Heart J ; 258: 114-118, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2175791

ABSTRACT

During the early COVID-19 pandemic, resources were at times rationed, and as a result, cardiovascular outcomes may have suffered, however despite this, there is a paucity of national data specifically examining the relationship between COVID-19 and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Some of the most robust previous cohort studies suggest the risk of AMI is increased in patients with COVID-19 infection, and disproportionately so in certain patient populations. To better define national trends in the associations between COVID-19 and AMI, this study aimed to examine demographics, outcomes, and health care utilization in hospitalizations for AMI with a codiagnosis of COVID-19 using a nationally representative database.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Hospitalization
13.
Int J Qual Health Care ; 34(4)2022 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087792

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the beginning of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in 2019, several countries have reported a substantial drop in the number of patients admitted with non-ST-segment myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the changes in admissions, in-hospital management and outcomes of patients with NSTEMI in the COVID-19 era in a nationwide survey. METHOD: A prospective, multicenter, observational, nationwide study involving 13 medical centers across Israel aimed to evaluate consecutive patients with NSTEMI admitted to intensive cardiac care units over an 8-week period during the COVID-19 outbreak and to compare them with NSTEMI patients admitted at the same period 2 years earlier (control period). RESULTS: There were 624 (43%) NSTEMI patients, of whom 349 (56%) were hospitalized during the COVID-19 era and 275 (44%) during the control period. There were no significant differences in age, gender and other baseline characteristics between the two study periods. During the COVID-19 era, more patients arrived at the hospital via an emergency medical system compared with the control period (P = 0.05). Time from symptom onset to hospital admission was longer in the COVID-19 era as compared with the control period [11.5 h (interquartile range, IQR, 2.5-46.7) vs. 2.9 h (IQR 1.7-6.8), respectively, P < 0.001]. Nevertheless, the time from hospital admission to reperfusion was similar in both groups. The rate of coronary angiography was also similar in both groups. The in-hospital mortality rate was similar in both the COVID-19 era and the control period groups (2.3% vs. 4.7%, respectively, P = 0.149) as was the 30-day mortality rate (3.7% vs. 5.1%, respectively, P = 0.238). CONCLUSION: In contrast to previous reports, admission rates of NSTEMI were similar in this nationwide survey during the COVID-19 era. With longer time from symptoms to admission, but with the same time from hospital admission to reperfusion therapy and with similar in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates. Even in times of crisis, adherence of medical systems to clinical practice guidelines ensures the preservation of good clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Prospective Studies , Israel/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy
14.
Folia Med Cracov ; 62(2): 71-92, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081393

ABSTRACT

I n t r o d u c t i o n: The COVID-19 pandemic has put healthcare systems worldwide under huge strain, resulting in a significant loss of their capacity and availability. Patients have become more reluctant to contact their doctors or call an ambulance in case of myocardial infarction (MI) symptoms onset. It has been accompanied by a significant decrease in the number of coronary angiography and PCI procedures performed. O b j e c t i v e s: The aim of the study is to evaluate the role of online health information in the patient- dependent phase of MI management during the COVID-19 lockdown in Europe. Methods: We analyzed Google Trends data on the popularity of phrases related to MI symptoms, respiratory tract infection, urological complaints, and terms unrelated to health, for the period of the first COVID-19 lockdown, along with the data from the corresponding weeks from 2017-2019 in seven European countries. R e s u l t s: The search volume for particular symptoms of myocardial infarction increased in all studied countries, compared to the analogous period from 2017-2019, with a significant increase in for chest pain, shortness of breath, fear, and palpitations in most countries. These changes have not been accompanied by increased interest in terms related to respiratory tract infection symptoms and urological complaints. C o n c l u s i o n s: Our findings suggest that during lockdown, patients with MI symptoms may have tried to manage their complaints on their own, using information from the Internet. This demonstrates the growing role of the Internet in the patient's decision-making process in the emergency situation, indicating a growing need for reliable and freely available online information provided by healthcare professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Europe/epidemiology
15.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 16(9): 1417-1423, 2022 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066671

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during the COVID-19 pandemic has been affected to varying degrees. This study is the first to explore the impact of COVID-19 on the treatment and prognosis of rural and urban AMI in developing countries. METHODOLOGY: A total of 128 patients with AMI in our hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic were enrolled. A total of 197 patients diagnosed with AMI before the COVID-19 pandemic were selected as the control group and one year of follow-up was performed. RESULTS: Hospital stay and the proportion of Killip class ≥ 2 patients were increased among rural AMI patients in the 'during COVID-19' group, compared with the 'before COVID-19' group. Among ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) total and rural STEMI patients, the treatment time in the during-COVID-19 group was longer than that in the before-COVID-19 group, whereas only the symptom to door (S to D) total and door to balloon (D to B) were extended in urban STEMI patients. In AMI total and rural AMI patients, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) and all-cause mortality were increased in the during-COVID-19 group compared with the before-COVID-19 group. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the survival and occurrence of MACEs in AMI total and rural AMI patients were significantly higher in the during-COVID-19 group. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic led to delayed treatment and worse prognosis in AMI patients. Rural areas appear to be at a greater risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Pandemics , Prognosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Time Factors
16.
Physiol Int ; 109(3): 419-426, 2022 Sep 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065212

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted many aspects of acute myocardial infarction. Based on literature data, the prognosis of COVID+, STEMI patients is significantly worse than that of COVID- STEMI patients. On the other hand, physicians report fewer acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients presenting to hospitals in countries severely affected by the pandemic. It is concerning that patients with life-threatening illness can suffer more complications or die due to their myocardial infarction. We aimed to investigate the changes in myocardial infarction care in the country's biggest PCI-center and to compare total 30-day mortality in COVID+ and COVID-patients with acute myocardial infarction treated at the Semmelweis University Heart and Vascular Center, and to investigate risk factors and complications in these two groups. Methods: Between 8 October 2020 and 30 April 2021, 43 COVID+, in 2018-2019, 397 COVID-patients with acute myocardial infarction were admitted. Total admission rates pre- and during the pandemic were compared. Results: Within 30 days, 8 of 43 patients in the COVID+ group (18.60%), and 40 of the 397 patients in the control group (10.07%) died (P = 0.01). Regarding the comorbidities, more than half of COVID+ patients had a significantly reduced ejection fraction (EF≤ 40%), and the prevalence of heart failure was significantly higher in this group (51.16% vs. 27.84%, P = 0.0329). There was no significant difference between the two patient groups in the incidence of STEMI and NSTEMI. Although there was no significant difference, VF (11.63% vs. 6.82%), resuscitation (23.26% vs. 10.08%), and ECMO implantation (2.38% vs. 1.26%) were more common in the COVID+ group. The mean age was 68.8 years in the COVID+ group and 67.6 years in the control group. The max. Troponin also did not differ significantly between the two groups (1,620 vs. 1,470 ng/L). There was a significant decline in admission rates in the first as well as in the second wave of the pandemic. Conclusions: The 30-day total mortality of COVID+ patients was significantly higher, and a more severe proceeding of acute myocardial infarction and a higher incidence of complications can be observed. As the secondary negative effect of the pandemic serious decline in admission rates can be detected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Hungary/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Pandemics , Prognosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Troponin
17.
Clin Cardiol ; 45(10): 1070-1078, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2013438

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The implications of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection on outcomes after invasive therapeutic strategies among patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are not well studied. HYPOTHESIS: To assess the outcomes of COVID-19 patients presenting with AMI undergoing an early invasive treatment strategy. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional, retrospective analysis of the National COVID Cohort Collaborative database including all patients presenting with a recorded diagnosis of AMI (ST-elevation myocardial infarction (MI) and non-ST elevation MI). COVID-19 positive patients with AMI were stratified into one of four groups: (1a) patients who had a coronary angiogram with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within 3 days of their AMI; (1b) PCI within 3 days of AMI with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) within 30 days; (2a) coronary angiogram without PCI and without CABG within 30 days; and (2b) coronary angiogram with CABG within 30 days. The main outcomes were respiratory failure, cardiogenic shock, prolonged length of stay, rehospitalization, and death. RESULTS: There were 10 506 COVID-19 positive patients with a diagnosis of AMI. COVID-19 positive patients with PCI had 8.2 times higher odds of respiratory failure than COVID-19 negative patients (p = .001). The odds of prolonged length of stay were 1.7 times higher in COVID-19 patients who underwent PCI (p = .024) and 1.9 times higher in patients who underwent coronary angiogram followed by CABG (p = .001). CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that COVID-19 positive patients with AMI undergoing early invasive coronary angiography had worse outcomes than COVID-19 negative patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Respiratory Insufficiency , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
18.
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv ; 100(4): 568-574, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2013401

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate characteristics and outcomes of patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction and cardiogenic shock (AMICS) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has created challenges in delivering acute cardiovascular care. Quality measures and outcomes of patients presenting with AMICS during COVID-19 in the United States have not been well described. METHODS: We identified 406 patients from the National Cardiogenic Shock Initiative (NCSI) with AMICS and divided them into those presenting before (N = 346, 5/9/2016-2/29/2020) and those presenting during the COVID-19 pandemic (N = 60, 3/1/2020-11/10/2020). We compared baseline clinical data, admission characteristics, and outcomes. RESULTS: The median age of the cohort was 64 years, and 23.7% of the group was female. There were no significant differences in age, sex, and medical comorbidities between the two groups. Patients presenting during the pandemic were less likely to be Black compared to those presenting prior. Median door to balloon (90 vs. 88 min, p = 0.38), door to support (88 vs. 78 min, p = 0.13), and the onset of shock to support (74 vs. 62 min, p = 0.15) times were not significantly different between the two groups. Patients presented with ST-elevation myocardial infarction more often during the COVID-19 period (95.0% vs. 80.0%, p = 0.005). In adjusted logistic regression models, COVID-19 period did not significantly associate with survival to discharge (odds ratio [OR] 1.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54-2.19, p = 0.81) or with 1-month survival (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.42-1.61, p = 0.56). CONCLUSIONS: Care of patients presenting with AMICS has remained robust among hospitals participating in the NCSI during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart-Assist Devices , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , COVID-19/complications , Female , Heart-Assist Devices/adverse effects , Humans , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Pandemics , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Shock, Cardiogenic/diagnosis , Shock, Cardiogenic/etiology , Shock, Cardiogenic/therapy , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology
19.
Crit Pathw Cardiol ; 21(3): 141-146, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001473

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 infection can involve the cardiovascular system and worsen the prognosis of the patients. This study aimed to investigate the adverse effects of COVID-19 on angiographic and clinical outcomes of primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with acute ST-elevation MI and compare results with those patients without COVID-19 disease. METHODS: The study was a retrospective observational cohort, in which patients presented with ST-elevation MI from February 2020 to April 2021, treated with primary PCI were divided into 2 groups based on the COVID-19 infection. Then, the procedural and angiographic indices and also clinical outcomes were compared between the 2 groups. RESULTS: A total of 1150 patients were enrolled in the study. Those with established COVID-19 infection had worse baseline thrombolysis in myocardial infarction flow grade and also were at higher risk for worse procedural outcomes such as lower thrombolysis in myocardial infarction frame count, myocardial blush grade, and slow-flow coronary disease, after the primary PCI. Additionally, the presence of COVID-19 at the time of primary PCI was related to a significantly higher duration of hospitalization and in-hospital mortality. Given the potential impact of other factors on outcomes, analysis for all of the primary endpoints was done again after adjustment of these factors and the results were the same as before, suggesting the independent effect of COVID-19 infection. CONCLUSIONS: The concomitant COVID-19 infection in the patients undergoing primary PCI is associated with significantly worse angiographic, procedural and clinical outcomes. Surprisingly, this finding is regardless of patients' baseline risk factors and demographical characteristics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronary Angiography , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/methods , Retrospective Studies , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/etiology , ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction/surgery , Treatment Outcome
20.
Clin Res Cardiol ; 111(10): 1174-1182, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1982134

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In this retrospective routine data analysis, we investigate the number of emergency department (ED) consultations during the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 in Germany compared to the previous year with a special focus on numbers of myocardial infarction and acute heart failure. METHODS: Aggregated case numbers for the two consecutive years 2019 and 2020 were obtained from 24 university hospitals and 9 non-university hospitals in Germany and assessed by age, gender, triage scores, disposition, care level and by ICD-10 codes including the tracer diagnoses myocardial infarction (I21) and heart failure (I50). RESULTS: A total of 2,216,627 ED consultations were analyzed, of which 1,178,470 occurred in 2019 and 1,038,157 in 2020. The median deviation in case numbers between 2019 and 2020 was - 14% [CI (- 11)-(- 16)]. After a marked drop in all cases in the first COVID-19 wave in spring 2020, case numbers normalized during the summer. Thereafter starting in calendar week 39 case numbers constantly declined until the end of the year 2020. The decline in case numbers predominantly concerned younger [- 16%; CI (- 13)-(- 19)], less urgent [- 18%; CI (- 12)-(- 22)] and non-admitted cases [- 17%; CI (- 13)-(- 20)] in particular during the second wave. During the entire observation period admissions for chest pain [- 13%; CI (- 21)-2], myocardial infarction [- 2%; CI (- 9)-11] and heart failure [- 2%; CI (- 10)-6] were less affected and remained comparable to the previous year. CONCLUSIONS: ED visits were noticeably reduced during both SARS-CoV-2 pandemic waves in Germany but cardiovascular diagnoses were less affected and no refractory increase was noted. However, long-term effects cannot be ruled out and need to be analysed in future studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Failure , Myocardial Infarction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Data Analysis , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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