Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 24
Filter
1.
Stem Cell Reports ; 17(3): 538-555, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692861

ABSTRACT

To date, the direct causative mechanism of SARS-CoV-2-induced endotheliitis remains unclear. Here, we report that human ECs barely express surface ACE2, and ECs express less intracellular ACE2 than non-ECs of the lungs. We ectopically expressed ACE2 in hESC-ECs to model SARS-CoV-2 infection. ACE2-deficient ECs are resistant to the infection but are more activated than ACE2-expressing ones. The virus directly induces endothelial activation by increasing monocyte adhesion, NO production, and enhanced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK), NF-κB, and eNOS in ACE2-expressing and -deficient ECs. ACE2-deficient ECs respond to SARS-CoV-2 through TLR4 as treatment with its antagonist inhibits p38 MAPK/NF-κB/ interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß) activation after viral exposure. Genome-wide, single-cell RNA-seq analyses further confirm activation of the TLR4/MAPK14/RELA/IL-1ß axis in circulating ECs of mild and severe COVID-19 patients. Circulating ECs could serve as biomarkers for indicating patients with endotheliitis. Together, our findings support a direct role for SARS-CoV-2 in mediating endothelial inflammation in an ACE2-dependent or -independent manner.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Models, Biological , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Endothelial Cells/cytology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells , Humans , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology , Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis , Toll-Like Receptor 4/antagonists & inhibitors , Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/genetics , p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism
2.
Cytokine ; 148: 155697, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385382

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 is a great threat to global public health. However, the relationship between the viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 and host innate immunity has not yet been well studied. The genome of SARS-CoV-2 encodes a viral protease called 3C-like protease. This protease is responsible for cleaving viral polyproteins during replication. In this investigation, 293T cells were transfected with SARS-CoV-2 3CL and then infected with Sendai virus (SeV) to induce the RIG-I like receptor (RLR)-based immune pathway. q-PCR, luciferase reporter assays, and western blotting were used for experimental analyses. We found that SARS-CoV-2 3CL significantly downregulated IFN-ß mRNA levels. Upon SeV infection, SARS-CoV-2 3CL inhibited the nuclear translocation of IRF3 and p65 and promoted the degradation of IRF3. This effect of SARS-CoV-2 3CL on type I IFN in the RLR immune pathway opens up novel ideas for future research on SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/metabolism , Interferon-beta/biosynthesis , Proteolysis , DEAD Box Protein 58/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Interferon-beta/genetics , NF-kappa B/genetics , Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , Response Elements/genetics , Sendai virus/physiology , Signal Transduction
3.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 218, 2020 10 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387198

Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Cardiac Glycosides/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Animals , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biological Products/chemistry , Biological Products/pharmacology , Bufanolides/chemistry , Bufanolides/pharmacology , COVID-19 , Cardiac Glycosides/chemistry , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chlorocebus aethiops , Chloroquine/chemistry , Chloroquine/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Digoxin/chemistry , Digoxin/pharmacology , High-Throughput Screening Assays , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/metabolism , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/genetics , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/genetics , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Pandemics , Phenanthrenes/chemistry , Phenanthrenes/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/antagonists & inhibitors , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/genetics , Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase/metabolism , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/drug effects
4.
J Virol ; 95(17): e0074721, 2021 08 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356909

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is bringing an unprecedented health crisis to the world. To date, our understanding of the interaction between SARS-CoV-2 and host innate immunity is still limited. Previous studies reported that SARS-CoV-2 nonstructural protein 12 (NSP12) was able to suppress interferon-ß (IFN-ß) activation in IFN-ß promoter luciferase reporter assays, which provided insights into the pathogenesis of COVID-19. In this study, we demonstrated that IFN-ß promoter-mediated luciferase activity was reduced during coexpression of NSP12. However, we could show NSP12 did not affect IRF3 or NF-κB activation. Moreover, IFN-ß production induced by Sendai virus (SeV) infection or other stimulus was not affected by NSP12 at mRNA or protein level. Additionally, the type I IFN signaling pathway was not affected by NSP12, as demonstrated by the expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Further experiments revealed that different experiment systems, including protein tags and plasmid backbones, could affect the readouts of IFN-ß promoter luciferase assays. In conclusion, unlike as previously reported, our study showed SARS-CoV-2 NSP12 protein is not an IFN-ß antagonist. It also rings the alarm on the general usage of luciferase reporter assays in studying SARS-CoV-2. IMPORTANCE Previous studies investigated the interaction between SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins and interferon signaling and proposed that several SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins, including NSP12, could suppress IFN-ß activation. However, most of these results were generated from IFN-ß promoter luciferase reporter assay and have not been validated functionally. In our study, we found that, although NSP12 could suppress IFN-ß promoter luciferase activity, it showed no inhibitory effect on IFN-ß production or its downstream signaling. Further study revealed that contradictory results could be generated from different experiment systems. On one hand, we demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 NSP12 could not suppress IFN-ß signaling. On the other hand, our study suggests that caution needs to be taken with the interpretation of SARS-CoV-2-related luciferase assays.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase , Interferon-beta , Promoter Regions, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2 , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/metabolism , Interferon-beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferon-beta/biosynthesis , Interferon-beta/genetics , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis , RNA, Messenger/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
5.
J Virol ; 95(17): e0074721, 2021 08 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1350002

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is bringing an unprecedented health crisis to the world. To date, our understanding of the interaction between SARS-CoV-2 and host innate immunity is still limited. Previous studies reported that SARS-CoV-2 nonstructural protein 12 (NSP12) was able to suppress interferon-ß (IFN-ß) activation in IFN-ß promoter luciferase reporter assays, which provided insights into the pathogenesis of COVID-19. In this study, we demonstrated that IFN-ß promoter-mediated luciferase activity was reduced during coexpression of NSP12. However, we could show NSP12 did not affect IRF3 or NF-κB activation. Moreover, IFN-ß production induced by Sendai virus (SeV) infection or other stimulus was not affected by NSP12 at mRNA or protein level. Additionally, the type I IFN signaling pathway was not affected by NSP12, as demonstrated by the expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Further experiments revealed that different experiment systems, including protein tags and plasmid backbones, could affect the readouts of IFN-ß promoter luciferase assays. In conclusion, unlike as previously reported, our study showed SARS-CoV-2 NSP12 protein is not an IFN-ß antagonist. It also rings the alarm on the general usage of luciferase reporter assays in studying SARS-CoV-2. IMPORTANCE Previous studies investigated the interaction between SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins and interferon signaling and proposed that several SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins, including NSP12, could suppress IFN-ß activation. However, most of these results were generated from IFN-ß promoter luciferase reporter assay and have not been validated functionally. In our study, we found that, although NSP12 could suppress IFN-ß promoter luciferase activity, it showed no inhibitory effect on IFN-ß production or its downstream signaling. Further study revealed that contradictory results could be generated from different experiment systems. On one hand, we demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 NSP12 could not suppress IFN-ß signaling. On the other hand, our study suggests that caution needs to be taken with the interpretation of SARS-CoV-2-related luciferase assays.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase , Interferon-beta , Promoter Regions, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2 , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/genetics , Coronavirus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase/metabolism , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/metabolism , Interferon-beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Interferon-beta/biosynthesis , Interferon-beta/genetics , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis , RNA, Messenger/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
6.
J Biol Chem ; 296: 100630, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1333548

ABSTRACT

Unchecked inflammation can result in severe diseases with high mortality, such as macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). MAS and associated cytokine storms have been observed in COVID-19 patients exhibiting systemic hyperinflammation. Interleukin-18 (IL-18), a proinflammatory cytokine belonging to the IL-1 family, is elevated in both MAS and COVID-19 patients, and its level is known to correlate with the severity of COVID-19 symptoms. IL-18 binds its specific receptor IL-1 receptor 5 (IL-1R5, also known as IL-18 receptor alpha chain), leading to the recruitment of the coreceptor, IL-1 receptor 7 (IL-1R7, also known as IL-18 receptor beta chain). This heterotrimeric complex then initiates downstream signaling, resulting in systemic and local inflammation. Here, we developed a novel humanized monoclonal anti-IL-1R7 antibody to specifically block the activity of IL-18 and its inflammatory signaling. We characterized the function of this antibody in human cell lines, in freshly obtained peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in human whole blood cultures. We found that the anti-IL-1R7 antibody significantly suppressed IL-18-mediated NFκB activation, reduced IL-18-stimulated IFNγ and IL-6 production in human cell lines, and reduced IL-18-induced IFNγ, IL-6, and TNFα production in PBMCs. Moreover, the anti-IL-1R7 antibody significantly inhibited LPS- and Candida albicans-induced IFNγ production in PBMCs, as well as LPS-induced IFNγ production in whole blood cultures. Our data suggest that blocking IL-1R7 could represent a potential therapeutic strategy to specifically modulate IL-18 signaling and may warrant further investigation into its clinical potential for treating IL-18-mediated diseases, including MAS and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Immunologic Factors/pharmacology , Interleukin-18/genetics , Receptors, Interleukin-18/genetics , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Candida albicans/growth & development , Candida albicans/pathogenicity , Gene Expression Regulation , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunologic Factors/biosynthesis , Inflammation , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-18/immunology , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/microbiology , Lipopolysaccharides/antagonists & inhibitors , Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology , Macrophage Activation Syndrome/drug therapy , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology , Primary Cell Culture , Receptors, Interleukin-18/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Interleukin-18/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
7.
J Biol Chem ; 297(1): 100856, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283409

ABSTRACT

The nuclear pore complex is the sole gateway connecting the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. In humans, the nuclear pore complex is one of the largest multiprotein assemblies in the cell, with a molecular mass of ∼110 MDa and consisting of 8 to 64 copies of about 34 different nuclear pore proteins, termed nucleoporins, for a total of 1000 subunits per pore. Trafficking events across the nuclear pore are mediated by nuclear transport receptors and are highly regulated. The nuclear pore complex is also used by several RNA viruses and almost all DNA viruses to access the host cell nucleoplasm for replication. Viruses hijack the nuclear pore complex, and nuclear transport receptors, to access the nucleoplasm where they replicate. In addition, the nuclear pore complex is used by the cell innate immune system, a network of signal transduction pathways that coordinates the first response to foreign invaders, including viruses and other pathogens. Several branches of this response depend on dynamic signaling events that involve the nuclear translocation of downstream signal transducers. Mounting evidence has shown that these signaling cascades, especially those steps that involve nucleocytoplasmic trafficking events, are targeted by viruses so that they can evade the innate immune system. This review summarizes how nuclear pore proteins and nuclear transport receptors contribute to the innate immune response and highlights how viruses manipulate this cellular machinery to favor infection. A comprehensive understanding of nuclear pore proteins in antiviral innate immunity will likely contribute to the development of new antiviral therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
Immunity, Innate/genetics , Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Pore/genetics , Virus Diseases/genetics , Active Transport, Cell Nucleus/genetics , Active Transport, Cell Nucleus/immunology , DNA Viruses/genetics , DNA Viruses/pathogenicity , Humans , Immune Evasion/genetics , Immune Evasion/immunology , NF-kappa B/genetics , Nuclear Pore/immunology , Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins/immunology , RNA Viruses/genetics , RNA Viruses/pathogenicity , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/virology , Virus Replication/genetics , Virus Replication/immunology
8.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0253089, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282298

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a devastating global pandemic, infecting over 43 million people and claiming over 1 million lives, with these numbers increasing daily. Therefore, there is urgent need to understand the molecular mechanisms governing SARS-CoV-2 pathogenesis, immune evasion, and disease progression. Here, we show that SARS-CoV-2 can block IRF3 and NF-κB activation early during virus infection. We also identify that the SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins NSP1 and NSP13 can block interferon activation via distinct mechanisms. NSP1 antagonizes interferon signaling by suppressing host mRNA translation, while NSP13 downregulates interferon and NF-κB promoter signaling by limiting TBK1 and IRF3 activation, as phospho-TBK1 and phospho-IRF3 protein levels are reduced with increasing levels of NSP13 protein expression. NSP13 can also reduce NF-κB activation by both limiting NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Last, we also show that NSP13 binds to TBK1 and downregulates IFIT1 protein expression. Collectively, these data illustrate that SARS-CoV-2 bypasses multiple innate immune activation pathways through distinct mechanisms.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Nucleus/immunology , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology , RNA-Binding Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Signal Transduction/immunology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/immunology , Active Transport, Cell Nucleus/genetics , Active Transport, Cell Nucleus/immunology , Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Cell Nucleus/genetics , HeLa Cells , Humans , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology , Phosphorylation/genetics , Phosphorylation/immunology , /immunology , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Signal Transduction/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
9.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(6)2021 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246687

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical consequences of SARS-CoV-2 and DENGUE virus co-infection are not promising. However, their treatment options are currently unavailable. Current studies have shown that quercetin is both resistant to COVID-19 and DENGUE; this study aimed to evaluate the possible functional roles and underlying mechanisms of action of quercetin as a potential molecular candidate against COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection. METHODS: We used a series of bioinformatics analyses to understand and characterize the biological functions, pharmacological targets and therapeutic mechanisms of quercetin in COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection. RESULTS: We revealed the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 and DENGUE, including pathological mechanisms, key inflammatory pathways and possible methods of intervention, 60 overlapping targets related to the co-infection and the drug were identified, the protein-protein interaction (PPI) was constructed and TNFα, CCL-2 and CXCL8 could become potential drug targets. Furthermore, we disclosed the signaling pathways, biological functions and upstream pathway activity of quercetin in COVID-19 and DENGUE. The analysis indicated that quercetin could inhibit cytokines release, alleviate excessive immune responses and eliminate inflammation, through NF-κB, IL-17 and Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to reveal quercetin as a pharmacological drug for COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection. COVID-19 and DENGUE co-infection remain a potential threat to the world's public health system. Therefore, we need innovative thinking to provide admissible evidence for quercetin as a potential molecule drug for the treatment of COVID-19 and DENGUE, but the findings have not been verified in actual patients, so further clinical drug trials are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Dengue Virus/chemistry , Dengue/drug therapy , Quercetin/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Chemokine CCL2/chemistry , Chemokine CCL2/drug effects , Chemokine CCL2/genetics , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/genetics , Coinfection/virology , Dengue/complications , Dengue/genetics , Dengue/virology , Dengue Virus/drug effects , Humans , Interleukin-17/genetics , Interleukin-8/chemistry , Interleukin-8/drug effects , Interleukin-8/genetics , NF-kappa B/drug effects , NF-kappa B/genetics , Protein Interaction Maps/drug effects , Quercetin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/chemistry , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/drug effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics
10.
J Biol Chem ; 296: 100687, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198855

ABSTRACT

Glucocorticoids are potent anti-inflammatory drugs that are used to treat an extraordinary range of human disease, including COVID-19, underscoring the ongoing importance of understanding their molecular mechanisms. Early studies of GR signaling led to broad acceptance of models in which glucocorticoid receptor (GR) monomers tether repressively to inflammatory transcription factors, thus abrogating inflammatory gene expression. However, newer data challenge this core concept and present an exciting opportunity to reframe our understanding of GR signaling. Here, we present an alternate, two-part model for transcriptional repression by glucocorticoids. First, widespread GR-mediated induction of transcription results in rapid, primary repression of inflammatory gene transcription and associated enhancers through competition-based mechanisms. Second, a subset of GR-induced genes, including targets that are regulated in coordination with inflammatory transcription factors such as NF-κB, exerts secondary repressive effects on inflammatory gene expression. Within this framework, emerging data indicate that the gene set regulated through the cooperative convergence of GR and NF-κB signaling is central to the broad clinical effectiveness of glucocorticoids in terminating inflammation and promoting tissue repair.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , NF-kappa B/genetics , Receptors, Glucocorticoid/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Genomics/methods , Humans , Inflammation/prevention & control , Models, Genetic , NF-kappa B/antagonists & inhibitors , NF-kappa B/immunology , Receptors, Glucocorticoid/agonists , Receptors, Glucocorticoid/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction , Transcription, Genetic/drug effects , Transcription, Genetic/immunology
11.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 96: 107671, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227634

ABSTRACT

Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a phenolic compound that has been well studied for its antiviral, anti-inflammatory and immune stimulating properties. This research was aimed to focus on the antiviral properties of CGA on infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) in vivo and in vitro for the very first time. The outcome of in vitro experiments validated that, out of five previously reported antiviral components, CGA significantly reduced the relative mRNA expression of IBV-N in CEK cells. At high concentration (400 mg/kg), CGA supplementation reduced IBV-N mRNA expression levels and ameliorated the injury in trachea and lungs. The mRNA expression levels of IL-6, IL-1ß, IL-12, and NF-κB were considerably turned down, but IL-22 and IL-10 were enhanced in trachea. However, CGA-H treatment had considerably increased the expression levels of MDA5, MAVS, TLR7, MyD88, IRF7, IFN-ß and IFN-α both in trachea and lungs. Moreover, CGA-H notably induced the CD3+, CD3+ CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ proliferation and significantly increased the IgA, IgG, and IgM levels in the serum. In conclusion, these results showed that at high concentration CGA is a strong anti-IBV compound that can effectively regulate the innate immunity through MDA5, TLR7 and NF-κB signaling pathways and have the potential to induce the cell mediated and humoral immune response in IBV infected chickens.


Subject(s)
Chlorogenic Acid/pharmacology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Gammacoronavirus/drug effects , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/metabolism , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 7/metabolism , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cells, Cultured , Chickens , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Gammacoronavirus/immunology , Gammacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Immunity, Innate , Interferon-Induced Helicase, IFIH1/genetics , NF-kappa B/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 7/genetics
12.
Mol Ther ; 29(3): 1174-1185, 2021 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-985497

ABSTRACT

Self-amplifying RNA (saRNA) is a cutting-edge platform for both nucleic acid vaccines and therapeutics. saRNA is self-adjuvanting, as it activates types I and III interferon (IFN), which enhances the immunogenicity of RNA vaccines but can also lead to inhibition of translation. In this study, we screened a library of saRNA constructs with cis-encoded innate inhibiting proteins (IIPs) and determined the effect on protein expression and immunogenicity. We observed that the PIV-5 V and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) ORF4a proteins enhance protein expression 100- to 500-fold in vitro in IFN-competent HeLa and MRC5 cells. We found that the MERS-CoV ORF4a protein partially abates dose nonlinearity in vivo, and that ruxolitinib, a potent Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) inhibitor, but not the IIPs, enhances protein expression of saRNA in vivo. Both the PIV-5 V and MERS-CoV ORF4a proteins were found to enhance the percentage of resident cells in human skin explants expressing saRNA and completely rescued dose nonlinearity of saRNA. Finally, we observed that the MERS-CoV ORF4a increased the rabies virus (RABV)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer and neutralization half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) by ∼10-fold in rabbits, but not in mice or rats. These experiments provide a proof of concept that IIPs can be directly encoded into saRNA vectors and effectively abate the nonlinear dose dependency and enhance immunogenicity.


Subject(s)
Immunity, Innate/drug effects , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Protein Biosynthesis/drug effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/pharmacology , Viral Envelope Proteins/administration & dosage , Animals , Cell Line , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/drug effects , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/immunology , Encephalitis Virus, Venezuelan Equine/pathogenicity , Fibroblasts , Gene Expression Regulation , HeLa Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/biosynthesis , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/genetics , Interferon Regulatory Factor-3/immunology , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/immunology , Mice , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/drug effects , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology , Nitriles , Parainfluenza Virus 5/drug effects , Parainfluenza Virus 5/immunology , Parainfluenza Virus 5/pathogenicity , Pyrazoles/pharmacology , Pyrimidines , Rabbits , Rabies virus/drug effects , Rabies virus/immunology , Rabies virus/pathogenicity , Rats , STAT Transcription Factors/antagonists & inhibitors , STAT Transcription Factors/genetics , STAT Transcription Factors/immunology , Signal Transduction , Vaccines, Synthetic/biosynthesis , Viral Envelope Proteins/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins/immunology
13.
JCI Insight ; 6(1)2021 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1027164

ABSTRACT

Immune and inflammatory responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) contribute to disease severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the utility of specific immune-based biomarkers to predict clinical outcome remains elusive. Here, we analyzed levels of 66 soluble biomarkers in 175 Italian patients with COVID-19 ranging from mild/moderate to critical severity and assessed type I IFN-, type II IFN-, and NF-κB-dependent whole-blood transcriptional signatures. A broad inflammatory signature was observed, implicating activation of various immune and nonhematopoietic cell subsets. Discordance between IFN-α2a protein and IFNA2 transcript levels in blood suggests that type I IFNs during COVID-19 may be primarily produced by tissue-resident cells. Multivariable analysis of patients' first samples revealed 12 biomarkers (CCL2, IL-15, soluble ST2 [sST2], NGAL, sTNFRSF1A, ferritin, IL-6, S100A9, MMP-9, IL-2, sVEGFR1, IL-10) that when increased were independently associated with mortality. Multivariate analyses of longitudinal biomarker trajectories identified 8 of the aforementioned biomarkers (IL-15, IL-2, NGAL, CCL2, MMP-9, sTNFRSF1A, sST2, IL-10) and 2 additional biomarkers (lactoferrin, CXCL9) that were substantially associated with mortality when increased, while IL-1α was associated with mortality when decreased. Among these, sST2, sTNFRSF1A, IL-10, and IL-15 were consistently higher throughout the hospitalization in patients who died versus those who recovered, suggesting that these biomarkers may provide an early warning of eventual disease outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , Biomarkers , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/therapy , Calgranulin B/genetics , Calgranulin B/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Chemokine CCL2/genetics , Chemokine CCL2/immunology , Chemokine CXCL9/genetics , Chemokine CXCL9/immunology , Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Female , Ferritins/genetics , Ferritins/immunology , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferon-gamma/genetics , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/genetics , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/immunology , Interleukin-10/genetics , Interleukin-10/immunology , Interleukin-15/genetics , Interleukin-15/immunology , Interleukin-2/genetics , Interleukin-2/immunology , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/immunology , Lactoferrin/genetics , Lactoferrin/immunology , Lipocalin-2/genetics , Lipocalin-2/immunology , Male , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/genetics , Matrix Metalloproteinase 9/immunology , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology
14.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(23)2020 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-951247

ABSTRACT

Activation of TLR7 by small imidazoquinoline molecules such as R848 or R837 initiates signaling cascades leading to the activation of transcription factors, such as AP-1, NF-κB, and interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and afterward to the induction of cytokines and anti-viral Type I IFNs. In general, TLRs mediate these effects by utilizing different intracellular signaling molecules, one of them is Mal. Mal is a protein closely related to the antibacterial response, and its role in the TLR7 pathways remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that Mal determines the expression and secretion of IFNß following activation of TLR7, a receptor that recognizes ssRNA and imidazoquinolines. Moreover, we observed that R848 induces Mal-dependent IFNß production via ERK1/2 activation as well as the transcription factor IRF7 activation. Although activation of TLR7 leads to NF-κB-dependent expression of IRF7, this process is independent of Mal. We also demonstrate that secretion of IFNß regulated by TLR7 and Mal in macrophages and dendritic cells leads to the IP-10 chemokine expression. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that Mal is a critical regulator of the imidazoquinolinones-dependent IFNß production via ERK1/2/IRF7 signaling cascade which brings us closer to understanding the molecular mechanism's regulation of innate immune response.


Subject(s)
Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Interferon-beta/genetics , Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics , Myelin and Lymphocyte-Associated Proteolipid Proteins/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 7/genetics , Animals , Cytokines/genetics , Humans , Immunity, Innate/genetics , Interferon Type I/genetics , MAP Kinase Signaling System/genetics , Mice , Mice, Knockout , NF-kappa B/genetics , Quinolones/toxicity , Transcription Factor AP-1/genetics
15.
In Vivo ; 34(6): 3723-3730, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910223

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Influenza viruses, corona viruses and related pneumotropic viruses cause sickness and death partly by inducing cytokine storm, a hyper-proinflammatory host response by immune cells and cytokines in the host airway. Based on our in vivo experience with digitoxin as an inhibitor of TNFα-driven NFĸB signaling for cytokine expression in prostate cancer in rats and in cystic fibrosis in humans, we hypothesize that this drug will also block a virally-activated cytokine storm. Materials Methods: Digitoxin was administered intraperitoneally to cotton rats, followed by intranasal infection with 107TCID50/100 g of cotton rat with influenza strain A/Wuhan/H3N2/359/95. Daily digitoxin treatment continued until harvest on day 4 of the experiment. RESULTS: The cardiac glycoside digitoxin significantly and differentially suppressed levels of the cytokines TNFα, GRO/KC, MIP2, MCP1, and IFNγ, in the cotton rat lung in the presence of influenza virus. CONCLUSION: Since cytokine storm is a host response, we suggest that digitoxin may have a therapeutic potential not only for influenza and but also for coronavirus infections.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Digitoxin/pharmacology , Lung/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Prostatic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Animals , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Cytokines/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/metabolism , Influenza, Human/virology , Lung/pathology , Male , NF-kappa B/genetics , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prostatic Neoplasms/complications , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Prostatic Neoplasms/virology , Rats , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics
16.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 240, 2020 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-872677

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has emerged as a global health emergency due to its association with severe pneumonia and relative high mortality. However, the molecular characteristics and pathological features underlying COVID-19 pneumonia remain largely unknown. To characterize molecular mechanisms underlying COVID-19 pathogenesis in the lung tissue using a proteomic approach, fresh lung tissues were obtained from newly deceased patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. After virus inactivation, a quantitative proteomic approach combined with bioinformatics analysis was used to detect proteomic changes in the SARS-CoV-2-infected lung tissues. We identified significant differentially expressed proteins involved in a variety of fundamental biological processes including cellular metabolism, blood coagulation, immune response, angiogenesis, and cell microenvironment regulation. Several inflammatory factors were upregulated, which was possibly caused by the activation of NF-κB signaling. Extensive dysregulation of the lung proteome in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection was discovered. Our results systematically outlined the molecular pathological features in terms of the lung response to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and provided the scientific basis for the therapeutic target that is urgently needed to control the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Lung Injury/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Proteome/genetics , Proteomics/methods , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/genetics , Aged , Autopsy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation , Gene Ontology , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lung Injury/metabolism , Lung Injury/pathology , Lung Injury/virology , Male , Metabolic Networks and Pathways , Molecular Sequence Annotation , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Proteome/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/metabolism , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/pathology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology , Severity of Illness Index , Signal Transduction
18.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 5(1): 186, 2020 09 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744366

ABSTRACT

Sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) is activated by cytokines or pathogen, such as virus or bacteria, but its association with diminished cholesterol levels in COVID-19 patients is unknown. Here, we evaluated SREBP-2 activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of COVID-19 patients and verified the function of SREBP-2 in COVID-19. Intriguingly, we report the first observation of SREBP-2 C-terminal fragment in COVID-19 patients' blood and propose SREBP-2 C-terminal fragment as an indicator for determining severity. We confirmed that SREBP-2-induced cholesterol biosynthesis was suppressed by Sestrin-1 and PCSK9 expression, while the SREBP-2-induced inflammatory responses was upregulated in COVID-19 ICU patients. Using an infectious disease mouse model, inhibitors of SREBP-2 and NF-κB suppressed cytokine storms caused by viral infection and prevented pulmonary damages. These results collectively suggest that SREBP-2 can serve as an indicator for severity diagnosis and therapeutic target for preventing cytokine storm and lung damage in severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Cholesterol/biosynthesis , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 2/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Gene Expression Regulation , Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics , Heat-Shock Proteins/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/genetics , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Primary Cell Culture , Proprotein Convertase 9/genetics , Proprotein Convertase 9/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 2/immunology , Survival Analysis , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/genetics , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/immunology
19.
Sci Adv ; 6(31)2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725277

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the highly contagious and deadly severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), also known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has posed a serious threat to public health across the globe, calling for the development of effective diagnostic markers and therapeutics. Here, we report a highly reliable severity diagnostic biomarker, acetylated 676th lysine transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein (TGFBIp K676Ac). TGFBIp K676Ac was consistently elevated in the blood of patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia (n = 113), especially in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) compared to non-ICU patients. Patients' blood samples showed increased cytokines and lymphopenia, which are exemplary indicators of SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. Treatment with TGFBIp neutralizing antibodies suppressed the cytokine storm. The increased level of TGFBIp K676Ac in ICU patients suggests the promise of this protein as a reliable severity diagnostic biomarker for severe SARS-CoV-2 disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnosis , Extracellular Matrix Proteins/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Protein Processing, Post-Translational , Respiratory Insufficiency/diagnosis , Transforming Growth Factor beta/immunology , Acetylation , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/blood , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Extracellular Matrix Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Extracellular Matrix Proteins/genetics , Gene Expression , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Leukocyte Count , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/drug effects , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/pathology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/virology , Lung/blood supply , Lung/drug effects , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lysine/metabolism , NF-kappa B/genetics , NF-kappa B/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Primary Cell Culture , Prognosis , Respiratory Insufficiency/blood , Respiratory Insufficiency/immunology , Respiratory Insufficiency/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Transforming Growth Factor beta/antagonists & inhibitors , Transforming Growth Factor beta/genetics
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL