Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(8)2022 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1992986

ABSTRACT

We present a rare complication of microwave ablation (MWA) in a male patient in his 80s. His massive pulmonary necrosis and tension pneumothorax required urgent surgery. However, the damage to the lung tissue was too large, deep and fragile. We failed to suture or conduct wedge resection on the lung lesion, so, left upper lobectomy was necessary. Therefore, we suggest that it is probably possible to reduce the frequency and time threshold when performing MWA for the elderly with comorbidities.


Subject(s)
Catheter Ablation , Lung Neoplasms , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Catheter Ablation/adverse effects , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lung/surgery , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Microwaves/adverse effects , Necrosis/etiology , Necrosis/surgery , Octogenarians
4.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 19(12): 3168-3170, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808315

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 due to SARS-CoV-2 was first described in the city of Wuhan in China and spread around the world turning into a pandemic. COVID-19 can affect different organ systems, including the oral mucosa. AIMS: Although cutaneous involvement has been defined in association with COVID-19, the number of case reports about mucosal involvement by SARS-CoV-2 is limited. Hereby, we report a case of hemorrhagic necrosis on the lip in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and COVID-19 infection and briefly discuss its possible mechanism. PATIENTS: The clinical features and causes of hemorrhagic necrosis on the lip in a woman are presented. RESULTS: In our patient, we think that PNH-associated dermal micro-occlusions caused extensive painful necrosis of the lip. Additionally, COVID-19-induced endothelial damage helped to develop exaggerated hemorrhagic necrosis. CONCLUSION: This current case presentation will contribute to the literature as another case with COVID-19 triggering mucosal involvement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/complications , Lip/pathology , Aged , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Hemoglobinuria, Paroxysmal/pathology , Humans , Necrosis/diagnosis , Necrosis/etiology , Necrosis/therapy
5.
Br J Sports Med ; 54(19): 1157-1161, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-744836

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is the causative virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. This pandemic has necessitated that all professional and elite sport is either suspended, postponed or cancelled altogether to minimise the risk of viral spread. As infection rates drop and quarantine restrictions are lifted, the question how athletes can safely resume competitive sport is being asked. Given the rapidly evolving knowledge base about the virus and changing governmental and public health recommendations, a precise answer to this question is fraught with complexity and nuance. Without robust data to inform policy, return-to-play (RTP) decisions are especially difficult for elite athletes on the suspicion that the COVID-19 virus could result in significant cardiorespiratory compromise in a minority of afflicted athletes. There are now consistent reports of athletes reporting persistent and residual symptoms many weeks to months after initial COVID-19 infection. These symptoms include cough, tachycardia and extreme fatigue. To support safe RTP, we provide sport and exercise medicine physicians with practical recommendations on how to exclude cardiorespiratory complications of COVID-19 in elite athletes who place high demand on their cardiorespiratory system. As new evidence emerges, guidance for a safe RTP should be updated.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Respiration Disorders/diagnosis , Return to Sport/standards , Athletes , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Death, Sudden, Cardiac/prevention & control , Electrocardiography , Humans , Myocarditis/blood , Myocarditis/etiology , Myocardium/pathology , Necrosis/etiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Respiration Disorders/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sports Medicine/standards , Symptom Assessment , Troponin/blood
6.
J Atheroscler Thromb ; 28(1): 90-95, 2021 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736814

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is an acute infectious disease that spreads mainly via the respiratory route. Elderly patients or those with underlying diseases are more seriously affected. We report a case of COVID-19 infection in a geriatric patient with arteriovenous thrombosis of the right lower limb. Despite persistent anticoagulant therapy, the patient's arterial thrombosis continued to progress and presented with ischemic necrosis of the lower extremity. After amputation in this case, the levels of D-dimer and inflammatory cytokine increased progressively, and he presented with acute myocardial infarction, which progressed rapidly to multisystem organ failure. However, whether coronavirus can directly cause the damage of the cardiovascular system and thrombosis needs further investigation.


Subject(s)
Amputation , COVID-19 , Lower Extremity , Multiple Organ Failure , Myocardial Infarction , Postoperative Complications , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thrombosis , Aged , Amputation/adverse effects , Amputation/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Fatal Outcome , Femoral Artery/diagnostic imaging , Femoral Vein/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Lower Extremity/pathology , Lower Extremity/surgery , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Multiple Organ Failure/therapy , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Necrosis/etiology , Necrosis/surgery , Postoperative Complications/blood , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/physiopathology , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/physiopathology , Thrombosis/therapy , Ultrasonography/methods
7.
World Neurosurg ; 140: 374-377, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647933

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A novel viral strain known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has created a worldwide pandemic known as coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). Early reports from China have highlighted the risks associated with performing endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery in patients with SARS-CoV-2. We present a rare complication of nasoseptal flap (NSF) necrosis associated with COVID-19, further emphasizing the challenges of performing these procedures in this era. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 78-year-old man underwent an extended endoscopic endonasal transplanum resection of a pituitary macroadenoma for decompression of the optic chiasm. The resulting skull base defect was repaired using a pedicled NSF. The patient developed meningitis and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak on postoperative day 13, requiring revision repair of the defect. Twelve days later, he developed persistent fever and rhinorrhea. The patient was reexplored endoscopically, and the NSF was noted to be necrotic and devitalized with evident CSF leakage. At that time, the patient tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Postoperatively, he developed acute respiratory distress syndrome complicated by hypoxic respiratory failure and death. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of NSF necrosis in a patient with COVID-19. We postulate that the thrombotic complications of COVID-19 may have contributed to vascular pedicle thrombosis and NSF necrosis. Although the pathophysiology of SARS-CoV-2 and its effect on the nasal tissues is still being elucidated, this case highlights some challenges of performing endoscopic skull base surgery in the era of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections , Neurosurgical Procedures/adverse effects , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Skull Base/surgery , Surgical Flaps/surgery , Aged , COVID-19 , Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak/etiology , Humans , Male , Necrosis/etiology , Postoperative Complications/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Flaps/virology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL