Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 386
Filter
1.
South Med J ; 116(6): 511-517, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236810

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: As a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, many Internal Medicine (IM) residency programs converted to telehealth for primary care. Our objectives in this study were to better understand resident past and present telehealth education, their perceived barriers to telehealth practice, and their perceived solutions to improving telehealth use and education. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional needs assessment survey between November 2020 and February 2021 among residents at 10 IM residency programs across the United States. Our primary measures were telehealth use in resident continuity clinics before and during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, telehealth training, and confidence and barriers in using telehealth. RESULTS: Of 857 residents contacted, 314 (36.6%) responded. Residents reported low rates of education in telehealth prepandemic with significant improvements after the start of the pandemic across all visit domains (range of 10.7%-19.6% prepandemic compared with 25.6%-55.7% postpandemic, all P < 0.001). Resident confidence levels were significantly lower (P < 0.001) for video visits and telephone visits compared with in-person visiting across domains of communication, history taking, using an interpreter, making a diagnosis, counseling patients, providing psychosocial support, performing medical management, and coordinating after-visit care. Reported barriers included patient resources, clinic resources, lack of preceptor feedback, and lack of observation. Reported resources for improvement included tutorials on physical examination techniques, clinical space for telehealth, and patient resources for telehealth. CONCLUSIONS: To effectively address the educational needs for telehealth practice by IM residents, educators must consider not only curricular needs but also clinical, preceptor, and patient barriers to the high-quality use of telehealth for primary care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Telemedicine , Humans , United States , COVID-19/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , Cross-Sectional Studies , Primary Health Care
2.
BMJ Open ; 13(5): e066189, 2023 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2317608

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The 2021 Action Plan for Pain from the Canadian Pain Task Force advocates for patient-centred pain care at all levels of healthcare across provinces. Shared decision-making is the crux of patient-centred care. Implementing the action plan will require innovative shared decision-making interventions, specifically following the disruption of chronic pain care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The first step in this endeavour is to assess current decisional needs (ie, decisions most important to them) of Canadians with chronic pain across their care pathways. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: DesignGrounded in patient-oriented research approaches, we will perform an online population-based survey across the ten Canadian provinces. We will report methods and data following the CROSS reporting guidelines.SamplingThe Léger Marketing company will administer the online population-based survey to its representative panel of 500 000 Canadians to recruit 1646 adults (age ≥18 years old) with chronic pain according to the definition by the International Association for the Study of Pain (eg, pain ≥12 weeks). ContentBased on the Ottawa Decision Support Framework, the self-administered survey has been codesigned with patients and contain six core domains: (1) healthcare services, consultation and postpandemic needs, (2) difficult decisions experienced, (3) decisional conflict, (4) decisional regret, (5) decisional needs and (6) sociodemographic characteristics. We will use several strategies such as random sampling to improve survey quality. AnalysisWe will perform descriptive statistical analysis. We will identify factors associated with clinically significant decisional conflict and decision regret using multivariate analyses. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics was approved by the Research Ethics Board at the Research Centre of the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke (project #2022-4645). We will codesign knowledge mobilisation products with research patient partners (eg, graphical summaries and videos). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed journals and national and international conferences to inform the development of innovative shared decision-making interventions for Canadians with chronic pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chronic Pain , Adult , Humans , Adolescent , Needs Assessment , Chronic Pain/therapy , Pandemics , Canada , Surveys and Questionnaires , Decision Making
3.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e385, 2023 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315480

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In January 2022, Fiji was hit by multiple natural disasters, including a cyclone causing flooding, an underwater volcanic eruption, and a tsunami. This study aimed to investigate perceived needs among the disaster-affected people in Fiji and to evaluate the feasibility of the Humanitarian Emergency Settings Perceived Needs Scale (HESPER Web) during the early stage after multiple natural disasters. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using a self-selected, non-representative study sample was conducted. The HESPER Web was used to collect data. RESULTS: In all, 242 people participated. The number of perceived serious needs ranged between 2 and 14 (out of a possible 26), with a mean of 6 (SD = 3). The top 3 most reported needs were access to toilets (60%), care for people in the community who are on their own (55%), and distress (51%). Volunteers reported fewer needs than the general public. CONCLUSIONS: The top 3 needs reported were related to water and sanitation and psychosocial needs. Such needs should not be underestimated in the emergency phase after natural disasters and may require more attention from responding actors. The HESPER Web was considered a usable tool for needs assessment in a sudden onset disaster.


Subject(s)
Disaster Planning , Natural Disasters , Needs Assessment , Humans , Fiji , Disaster Victims/psychology , Feasibility Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Floods , Tsunamis , Cyclonic Storms , Volcanic Eruptions , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged
4.
PLoS One ; 18(4): e0284448, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292654

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several attempts have been made to introduce mHealth solutions to support maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH). However, most of the available apps do not meet the needs of end-users, underscoring the urgency of involving them in the co-design of telehealth interventions. OBJECTIVE: With this in mind, we investigated the needs and expectations of hospital-based health professionals (i.e., secondary users) providing care to pregnant women and new mothers with their babies for a hypothetical mHealth app to support the first 1000 days of life. METHODS: From November 2021 to March 2022, we surveyed health professionals using a questionnaire that explored the perceived importance of specific content, functionalities, and technical features of the proposed app. We also collected sociodemographic information from secondary users. We performed descriptive analysis and then used Ward hierarchical clustering method to classify respondents according to their response patterns. RESULTS: We recorded the needs and expectations of 145 hospital-based health professionals from obstetrics/gynecology, nursery/neonatology, and pediatrics. We found general agreement with the proposed content of the app, particularly general information about health during pregnancy (92%) and potential risky infections during pregnancy (91%). Three clusters emerged from the analysis, with the high and medium demanding clusters rating the importance of app content and technical features as very high and high, respectively, while low demanding cluster expressing more skepticism, especially about some of the proposed functionalities of the app. CONCLUSIONS: Assessing the needs and expectations of end-users is an essential process for developing tailored and effective mHealth solutions. This study has shown that hospital-based health professionals generally recognize the value of the proposed app, suggesting their propensity to integrate such a telehealth solution into mainstream clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Telemedicine , Child , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Mothers , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Health Services Needs and Demand , Needs Assessment
9.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 82(1): 2183586, 2023 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278056

ABSTRACT

The eleven Indigenous communities served by the File Hills Qu'Appelle Tribal Council (FHQTC) in Saskatchewan, Canada have experienced a progressive reduction in access to physical and occupational therapy services. A community-directed needs assessment facilitated by FHQTC Health Services was undertaken in the summer of 2021 to identify experiences and barriers of community members in accessing rehabilitation services. Sharing circles were conducted according to FHQTC COVID-19 policies; researchers connected to community members via Webex virtual conferencing software. Community stories and experiences were collected via sharing circles and semi-structured interviews. Data was analysed using an iterative thematic analysis approach with NVIVO qualitative analysis software. An overarching theme of culture contextualised five primary themes: 1) Barriers to Rehabilitation Care, 2) Impacts on Family and Quality of Life, 3) Calls for Services, 4) Strength Based Supports, and 5) What Care Should Look Like. Each theme is comprised of numerous subthemes amassed by stories from community members. Five recommendations were developed to enhance culturally responsive access to local services in FHQTC communities: 1) Rehabilitation Staffing Requirements, 2) Integration with Cultural Care, 3) Practitioner Education and Awareness, 4) Patient and Community-Centered Care, and 5) Feedback and Ongoing Evaluation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Services, Indigenous , Humans , Needs Assessment , Quality of Life , Saskatchewan , Qualitative Research , Health Services Accessibility
10.
Patient Educ Couns ; 106: 180-187, 2023 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275235

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Effective education and support for adults with dementia and their caregivers around pandemic issues is critical for protecting them. Animation-based learning has shown promise in patient education. We collaborated with educators and support staff at Alzheimer's Association Connecticut (AACT) to conduct a mixed-methods study and develop an animated e-curriculum addressing pandemic related challenges. METHODS: We conducted focus groups and surveys with dementia and caregiver educators and support staff at AACT for the initial needs assessment and the later e-curriculum evaluation. An interdisciplinary team of educators followed a step-wise process to transform the needs assessment results into an animation based e-curriculum. RESULTS: Participants identified the following pandemic challenges: 1) social isolation, 2) caregiver fatigue, 3) safety, and 4) difficulty navigating the healthcare system. The overall quality and usefulness of the e-curriculum was "very good" or "excellent". CONCLUSIONS: An animated e-curriculum addressing pandemic related issues relevant to adults with dementia and caregivers had positive reviews and was associated with improvement in self-reported ability to perform curriculum objectives among community dementia educators. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The pandemic challenges identified may facilitate the development of further resources. Additionally, this project may serve as a guide for clinicians interested in incorporating animation into education efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dementia , Adult , Humans , Caregivers/education , Dementia/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Needs Assessment
11.
J Law Med Ethics ; 50(4): 719-725, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2270481

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on the challenges of complying with public health guidance to isolate or quarantine without access to adequate income, housing, food, and other resources. When people cannot safely isolate or quarantine during an outbreak of infectious disease, a critical public health strategy fails. This article proposes integrating sociolegal needs screening and services into contact tracing as a way to mitigate public health harms and pandemic-related health inequities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Contact Tracing , Health Services Needs and Demand , Needs Assessment , Social Determinants of Health , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Food , Pandemics , Quarantine , Physical Distancing , Patient Isolation , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Socioeconomic Factors
12.
PLoS One ; 18(3): e0282103, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2264974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Non-medical health-related social needs (social needs) are major contributors to worse health outcomes and may have an adverse impact on cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular disease. The present study evaluated the effect of a closed-loop community-based pathway in reducing social needs among Black men in a lifestyle change program. METHODS: Black men (n = 70) from a large Midwestern city participated in Black Impact, a 24-week community-based team lifestyle change single-arm pilot trial adapted from the Diabetes Prevention Program and American Heart Association's (AHA) Check, Change, Control Blood Pressure Self-Management Program, which incorporates AHA's Life's Simple 7 (LS7) framework. Participants were screened using the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Accountable Health Communities Health-Related Social Needs Screening Tool. Participants with affirmative responses were referred to a community hub pathway to address social needs. The primary outcome for this analysis is change in social needs based on the CMS social needs survey at 12 and 24 weeks using mixed effect logistic regressions with random intercepts for each participant. Change in a LS7 score (range 0-14) from baseline to 12 and 24 weeks was evaluated using a linear mixed-effects model stratified by baseline social needs. RESULTS: Among 70 participants, the mean age of participants was 52 ±10.5 years. The men were sociodemographically diverse, with annual income ranging from <$20,000 (6%) to ≥$75,000 (23%). Forty-three percent had a college degree or higher level of education, 73% had private insurance, and 84% were employed. At baseline 57% of participants had at least one social need. Over 12 and 24 weeks, this was reduced to 37% (OR 0.33, 95%CI: 0.13, 0.85) and 44% (OR 0.50, 95%CI: 0.21, 1.16), respectively. There was no association of baseline social needs status with baseline LS7 score, and LS7 score improved over 12 and 24 weeks among men with and without social needs, with no evidence of a differential effect. CONCLUSIONS: The Black Impact lifestyle change single-arm pilot program showed that a referral to a closed-loop community-based hub reduced social needs in Black men. We found no association of social needs with baseline or change in LS7 scores. Further evaluation of community-based strategies to advance the attainment of LS7 and address social needs among Black men in larger trials is warranted.


Subject(s)
Black or African American , Cardiovascular Diseases , Adult , Aged , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Life Style , Medicare , Pandemics , Risk Factors , United States/epidemiology , Needs Assessment
13.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) ; 63(1): 361-365.e1, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2253051

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People who inject drugs (PWID) are subject to injection-related harm, including skin and soft tissue infections. Syringe services programs (SSPs) provide sterile syringes, disposal of used syringes, and other supportive services. Given their contact and credibility with PWID, SSPs could facilitate triage and treatment of wounds and access to immunizations for communicable diseases. OBJECTIVE: This work aimed to assess wound care and immunization needs among participants accessing mobile SSP services in Austin, TX. METHODS: A 21-item mixed-methods survey was created to assess frequency and severity of wounds, wound care approaches, and vaccination status. Participants were included if they reported injection drug use and experienced a related wound in the previous 6 months. Interview sections included screening, demographics, wound care, and immunization status. RESULTS: A total of 21 participants completed the semistructured interview. A majority identified as male (n = 13, 61.9%), white (n = 12, 57.1%), and were unhoused (n = 12, 57.1%). The primary drug of injection was heroin alone (n = 14, 66.7%). Many avoided seeking wound care from health care providers (n = 16, 76.2%) owing to stigmatization (n = 13, 61.9%) and previous negative experiences (n = 7, 33.3%). Self-treatment of wounds included over-the-counter medications (n = 10, 47.6%), over-the-counter supplies (n = 10, 47.6%), and antibiotics (n = 9, 42.8%). In the past 5 years, few had received vaccination for hepatitis A and B (n = 3, 14.3%) or tetanus (n = 7, 33.3%), and many expressed interest in receiving vaccinations through the SSP. Interest for other expanded services included access to antibiotics, an on-site provider, wound care supplies, and education. CONCLUSIONS: PWID may avoid professional health care for wound care or immunizations owing to perceived stigma. Expanding availability of wound care services and immunizations directly through mobile SSPs is desired by participants and could positively affect public health.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Substance Abuse, Intravenous , Humans , Male , Needle-Exchange Programs , Syringes , Needs Assessment , Immunization , Vaccination , HIV Infections/prevention & control
14.
PLoS One ; 17(12): e0279282, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2252143

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In community-based research projects, needs assessments are one of the first steps to identify community priorities. Access-related issues often pose significant barriers to participation in research and evaluation for rural and remote communities, particularly Indigenous communities, which also have a complex relationship with academia due to a history of exploitation. To bridge this gap, work with Indigenous communities requires consistent and meaningful engagement. The prominence of digital devices (i.e., smartphones) offers an unparalleled opportunity for ethical and equitable engagement between researchers and communities across jurisdictions, particularly in remote communities. METHODS: This paper presents a framework to guide needs assessments which embed digital platforms in partnership with Indigenous communities. Guided by this framework, a qualitative needs assessment was conducted with a subarctic Métis community in Saskatchewan, Canada. This project is governed by an Advisory Council comprised of Knowledge Keepers, Elders, and youth in the community. An environmental scan of relevant programs, three key informant interviews, and two focus groups (n = 4 in each) were conducted to systematically identify community priorities. RESULTS: Through discussions with the community, four priorities were identified: (1) the Coronavirus pandemic, (2) climate change impacts on the environment, (3) mental health and wellbeing, and (4) food security and sovereignty. Given the timing of the needs assessment, the community identified the Coronavirus pandemic as a key priority requiring digital initiatives. CONCLUSION: Recommendations for community-based needs assessments to conceptualize and implement digital infrastructure are put forward, with an emphasis on self-governance and data sovereignty.


Subject(s)
Mental Health , Adolescent , Humans , Aged , Needs Assessment , Focus Groups , Saskatchewan
15.
Inquiry ; 60: 469580221146831, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2194780

ABSTRACT

At the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic, Alabama's Title V Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) team was forced to innovate in order to gather community input and to prioritize the findings of the 2020 Title V Maternal and Child Health Five-Year Comprehensive Needs Assessment. On a shortened timeline, the team pivoted from a full-day, in-person meeting of professionals and family representatives to an asynchronous, online "meeting" that included all planned and necessary content, allowed for comment by community members, and resulted in a prioritized list of needs. This needs assessment process showed that by using a platform like the online survey tool, Qualtrics, in an innovative way, programs can capture broader, more diverse perspectives without sacrificing quality of communication, content, or feedback. It shows the possibility for strengthening maternal and child health (MCH) systems and other systems of care though rich engagement. This model can be easily replicated in other survey tools, benefiting other states that are faced with difficulties convening geographically dispersed professionals and communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Adolescent , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Delivery of Health Care , Needs Assessment
16.
J Med Libr Assoc ; 110(3): 306-315, 2022 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2202617

ABSTRACT

Objective: Health sciences librarian roles are evolving to better meet the needs of faculty. This study explores nursing faculty needs at the University of British Columbia through the research lifecycle framework of planning, conducting, disseminating, and assessing the impact of their research. Methods: A mixed methods survey study with Likert scale, multiple-choice, or ordinal ranking-scale questions and six open-response questions was conducted. The format was a web-based Qualtrics survey; participants had approximately three weeks to respond. Results: Nursing faculty identified the dissemination phase as benefiting most from library support prioritizing reference management and archiving research data as the top needs in that phase. Assessing impact skills such as citation analysis and Altmetrics training was ranked second. The Planning phase was ranked third with systematic review and literature review support most needed. The Conducting phase was identified as the phase where they needed the least support. Conclusion: Understanding the needs of researchers and enhancing scholar productivity is vital to offering responsive library research services. Across the research lifecycle, nursing faculty identified reference management, data management, metrics evaluation, systematic reviews, and literature reviews as the key areas for which they need support.


Subject(s)
Library Services , Humans , Needs Assessment , Faculty, Nursing , Research Personnel , Data Management
17.
Lancet ; 400 Suppl 1: S82, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2132746

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected people experiencing homelessness in multiple ways. The Everyone In initiative during 2020 was initially transformative in providing short-term accommodation for this group but was accompanied by major disruptions to treatment and support services. Understanding how these changes have affected health needs of people experiencing homelessness in the inner-city London Borough of Tower Hamlets can inform future service commissioning. METHODS: We conducted a focussed health needs assessment of people experiencing homelessness in Tower Hamlets. Quantitative data were gathered from the Combined Homelessness and Information Network (CHAIN), local authority housing services, primary care datasets, and substance dependency services. These data were combined with qualitative data from stakeholder meetings, facility visits, and lived experience insight from service users through interviews and focus groups. Analysis was targeted towards identifying gaps in existing commissioning. FINDINGS: We gathered data from 80 service users experiencing homelessness in Tower Hamlets between Sept 1 to Dec 31, 2021. Participants reported the largest impact of the pandemic being on their mental health. For people registered with specific homeless primary care services, 26·3% were experiencing depression and 12·8% other severe mental health issues. Service users with lived experience of homelessness described feeling let down by mental health support systems, describing that, despite positive experiences of individual staff, they felt the system as a whole was not well integrated. Specific issues were identified in hostel-based accommodation, where poor psychological and physical safety during lockdowns contributed to declines in mental health. INTERPRETATION: Using a health needs assessment, a necessity was identified to support the mental health of people experiencing homelessness in Tower Hamlets emerging from pandemic restrictions. People with lived experience of homelessness attributed deteriorations in mental health to extended time in inadequate accommodation, and reported that environments that take account of emotional and psychological needs were required. Provision of psychologically-informed accommodation environments and improved support service integration must be priorities for future local authority commissioning. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ill-Housed Persons , Humans , Pandemics , London/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control
20.
JAMA Health Forum ; 3(10): e223764, 2022 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2084932

ABSTRACT

This survey study uses 2020 American Hospital Association data to assess strategies of US hospitals serving vulnerable populations in addressing social needs during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Hospitals , Needs Assessment
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL