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3.
JAMA Health Forum ; 3(10): e223764, 2022 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2084932

ABSTRACT

This survey study uses 2020 American Hospital Association data to assess strategies of US hospitals serving vulnerable populations in addressing social needs during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Hospitals , Needs Assessment
6.
Integr Cancer Ther ; 21: 15347354221123525, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053756

ABSTRACT

The year 2022 could represent a significant juncture in the incorporation of mHealth solutions in routine cancer care. With the recent global COVID-19 pandemic leading a surge in both observation- and intervention-based studies predominantly aimed at remote monitoring there has been huge intellectual investment in developing platforms able to provide real time analytics that are readily usable. Another fallout from the pandemic has seen record waiting times and delayed access to cancer therapies leading to exhausting pressures on global healthcare providers. It seems an opportune time to utilize this boom in platforms to offer more efficient "at home" clinical assessments and less "in department" time for patients. Here, we will focus specifically on the role of digital tools around cancer survivorship, a relevant aspect of the cancer journey, particularly benefiting from integrative approaches. Within that context a further concept will be introduced and that is of the likely upsurge in circadian-based interpretation of continuous monitoring and the engendered therapeutic modifications. Chronobiology across the 24-hour span has long been understood to control key bodily aspects and circadian dysregulation plays a significant role in the risk of cancer and also the response to therapy and therefore progressive outcome. The rapid improvement in minimally invasive monitoring devices is, in the opinion of the authors, likely to advance introducing chronobiological amendments to routine clinical practices with positive impact on cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Humans , Needs Assessment , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods
7.
Int J Equity Health ; 21(1): 137, 2022 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038765

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate effect on the Black/African American population. In addition to the higher infection rates and the worse outcomes, there were other unintended consequences of the pandemic. The study objective was to determine the impact of COVID-19 on the Black/African American community. METHODS: A needs assessment was conducted using a mixed-methods approach. To address this specific study objective, an item included in the survey questionnaire asked respondents (n = 183) about their greatest worry related to CODID-19. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted to further explore individual and community perceptions. RESULTS: The areas of greatest concern were Health (41.0%), Family (25.1%), Finances (8.2%), and Education (4.9%). The needs assessment revealed that the COVID-19 pandemic had a profound impact on the mental health and wellness, healthcare access and utilization, and social aspects of life the Black community. Emerging themes revealed that there was worsening mental health for many, limited healthcare access and under-utilization, and profound disruption of the social cohesive identity of the Black/African American community. CONCLUSION: Pre-existing structural inequities are implicated in the mental health impact, as well as the under-utilization of and limited access to healthcare services in the Black/African American population. The impact on social well-being emphasizes the important role of culture in the population health of communities of color, further supporting the need for culturally-responsive public health interventions when targeting these communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Mental Health , Needs Assessment , Pandemics
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1987800

ABSTRACT

Due to political conflict, insurgency, and the COVID-19, the number of displaced households in need of humanitarian support in Iraq has increased. This study investigated factors related to desire of displaced households to receive humanitarian information. Data from the eighth round of the Iraq Multi-Cluster Needs Assessment was used. We classified the household displacement status, identifying levels and types of humanitarian information that the households sought, together with whether the households were impacted by COVID-19. We identified safety and security, housing, water and electricity services, education, health care, and levels of humanitarian assistance resulted in significant differences between internally displaced person (IDP) and returnee households in terms of interest in receiving humanitarian information. The desire to receive humanitarian information was related to whether household members were unemployed due to COVID-19, displacement status, and walking time to reach the nearest health care facility and marketplace. Returnees and IDPs in Iraq are facing a new crisis. Their individual, structural, and environmental vulnerabilities are increasing commensurately. New strategies such as strategies using online or mobile communication that provide humanitarian information are needed to provide humanitarian information to vulnerable groups such as those who have lost jobs due to COVID-19, female heads of households, and those with health problems. In addition to traditional cash and voucher support, the use of the latest technologies such as smartphones and mobile clinics in humanitarian settings would be new strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Refugees , COVID-19/epidemiology , Family Characteristics , Female , Humans , Iraq , Needs Assessment
9.
J Appl Gerontol ; 41(12): 2557-2565, 2022 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1986626

ABSTRACT

We undertook a qualitative assessment of aged care technology needs from the perspective of consumers and providers using a cross-sectional survey that assumed a largely open-response format. We recruited a convenience sample of individuals aged 18 years or older, lived in Australia, and self-identified as either an older adult (n = 133), an informal caregiver of an older adult (n = 27), and/or clinician, healthcare practitioner, and aged care provider (n = 148). Survey responses were analyzed using a descriptive qualitative content analysis approach to interpret meaning from written survey responses. We identified seven themes reporting that technologies used in aged care do not appear to be meeting end-user needs. Supporting the Technology Acceptance Model, consumers and providers perceive usefulness of the technology and its actual ease of use as drivers of acceptance toward gerontechnology. Ten recommendations are proposed to support technology use and the quality of aged care.


Subject(s)
Technology , Humans , Aged , Needs Assessment , Cross-Sectional Studies , Australia , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Prog Community Health Partnersh ; 16(2S): 5-12, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974207

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the accelerated spread of COVID-19 and current shelter-in-place orders from many local governments, African American (AA) communities see to be more vulnerable as emerging data show disproportionate rates of infection and mortality among AAs across the nation. OBJECTIVES: In a sample of AA church members, to conduct a rapid community assessment during the early phase of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: Our community-based participatory research team, partnering with the local AA church community and including trained lay health workers, conducted the assessment via telephone and online. RESULTS: Although most participants reported high confidence regarding recommendations for physical distancing, more than 60% reported elevated anxiety and stress, and 10% indicated that they needed more information about staying healthy and safe during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Community-based participatory research with lay health workers is an effective method to implement a community needs assessment, problem-solve with community members, and build community health infrastructure during a public health crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , African Americans , Community-Based Participatory Research , Humans , Needs Assessment , Pandemics
11.
J Community Health ; 47(6): 943-948, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1971769

ABSTRACT

Due to the sudden rise in the cases of COVID-19 in the North-Eastern region of India, this study was conducted to survey the felt needs of the medical professionals with regards to education on the evidence-based management of COVID-19. A total of 25 North-East leaders were recruited and a baseline survey was conducted through the digital medium. Out of 25 North-East leaders, 52% were undergoing training in evidence-based medicine in the capacity-building program for evidence-based child health. Participants (48%) strongly agreed and 40% agreed on the possibility of enhanced care by capacity building in the areas of COVID-19 management through discussing cases. Out of 25 North East leaders, 48% agreed to join both as a speaker as well as a participant. Various priority topics on COVID-19 management e.g. childhood, adult, ocular manifestation, ICU management, telemedicine, vaccines, lab protocols, psychological distress, and treatment strategy have emerged. We have presented the findings of the survey which will help guide the mentoring program focusing on evidence-based management of COVID-19 in remote areas through Tele-education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Evidence-Based Medicine , Telemedicine , Adult , Child , Humans , Capacity Building , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Mentors , Evidence-Based Medicine/education , Needs Assessment , India/epidemiology
12.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 28(5 Suppl 5): S263-S270, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1961249

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The Region V Public Health Training Center (RVPHTC) serves the public health workforce in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. An important tool in priority-setting workforce development is the training needs assessment (TNA), which is vital to identifying and addressing the capacity-building needs of the public health workforce. PROGRAM: In 2021, we conducted semistructured qualitative interviews with key partners in the local, state, and tribal health workforce. IMPLEMENTATION: Findings reflect the results of 23 interviews administered from March to May 2021. Questions solicited in-depth input related to key training gaps identified in our 2020 quantitative TNA; the impact of COVID-19 on the public health workforce; general needs, including preferred training modalities; needs by audience type; and the current capacity for public health agencies to support student development. EVALUATION: Key training needs of the public health workforce identified by the 2021 TNA include the strategic skills domains of (1) resource management; (2) change management; (3) justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion; and (4) effective communication. The first 3 domains were also noted as having the greatest training need in our 2020 quantitative TNA of local health department leadership. DISCUSSION: The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the need for training in effective communication in new ways and the continued need for training support in the skill domains prioritized in the 2020 assessment. Findings demonstrate the need for capacity building around crosscutting skills and the intersection of strategic skill domains if the field is to be prepared for future threats to public health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Public Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Workforce , Humans , Needs Assessment , Pandemics , Public Health/methods
14.
Sch Psychol ; 37(4): 309-318, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815494

ABSTRACT

Using a community-partnered research framework, the goal of this study was to rapidly assess coronavirus disease (COVID-19) impact on teachers, students, and families and guidance received to navigate distance learning. Participants were teachers (N = 430) working in elementary schools (n = 301), middle schools (n = 56), high schools (n = 60), and other schools (n = 13) in two large urban school districts heavily impacted by COVID-19. Results indicated teacher concerns regarding student instructional loss and exposure to direct and indirect COVID-related trauma. There were mean differences in teacher concern by school level (p = .001, η² = .033) with elementary teachers reporting the greatest concerns regarding instructional loss. Over 40% of teachers reported that more than 20% of their students had a family member infected with COVID-19 or employed as a frontline healthcare worker. Approximately 99% of teachers reported a significant gap in student access to the internet and distance learning devices. Teachers reported receiving more school than district guidance regarding distance learning, student engagement, and using social emotional learning (SEL) programs. Results informed professional development priorities for educators and immediate supports needed for students and families. Study limitations and future directions for research and practice are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , School Teachers , Humans , Needs Assessment , Pandemics , School Teachers/psychology , Schools
15.
Health Expect ; 25(2): 721-731, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764936

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a need for effective health service solutions to provide greater structure and support for implementing evidence-based practice in back pain care. Patient involvement in developing these solutions is crucial to increase relevance, acceptability and uptake. OBJECTIVES: To determine patients' perceived needs and barriers to best-practice back pain care, and potential solutions to better address care needs. The study is the third in a series of needs assessment studies feeding into the 'idea generation' for service design in a large teaching hospital in a culturally and linguistically diverse community in metropolitan Sydney, Australia. DESIGN: We conducted a combination of focus groups and in-depth interviews using an interpretive description approach. We used inductive thematic analysis to identify the main themes. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: We purposively sampled patients with diverse characteristics from the neurosurgery and physiotherapy outpatient clinics, in particular those whose primary language was English, Arabic, Persian or Mandarin. Non-English audio recordings were translated and transcribed by bilingual researchers. RESULTS: There were 24 participants (focus groups = 9; individual interviews = 15) when data saturation was reached. The analysis identified three key themes with several subthemes around what service designers needed to understand in helping people with back pain in this setting: (1) This is who I am; (2) It's not working for me; and (3) What I think I need. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: This study highlights that perceived unmet needs of patients are underpinned by unhelpful beliefs about the causes of and solutions for back pain, misaligned care expectations, unclear expectations of the hospital role and fragmentations in the health system. To design and implement a service that can deliver better back pain care, several solutions need to be integrated around: developing new resources that challenge unhelpful beliefs and set realistic expectations; improving access to education and self-management resources; focusing on individualized care; using a collaborative multidisciplinary approach within the hospital; and better connecting with and directing primary health care services. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: A consumer representative of the Western Sydney Local Health District provided input during study conceptualisation and is duly recognized in the Acknowledgements section.


Subject(s)
Back Pain , Self-Management , Back Pain/therapy , Hospitals , Humans , Needs Assessment , Qualitative Research
16.
Am J Prev Med ; 63(2): 273-276, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739508

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact beyond physical morbidity and mortality. A mid-cycle Community Health Needs Assessment survey was administered in 1 community to generate data to evaluate change in community well-being since the beginning of the pandemic. METHODS: Surveys were mailed to 2,000 randomly selected residents in Olmsetd County, Minnesota. The surveys included the WHO Well-being Index (previously included in the 2018 Community Health Needs Assessment) and new subjective questions regarding behavior change. Changes in well-being were calculated using a propensity-matched cohort, and behavior change was reported as proportions of the whole. Data analysis was completed in 2021. RESULTS: Total survey respondents were 569 people in 2018 and 723 people in 2021. Well-being scores from the WHO Well-being Index showed a statistically significant decrease (score reduction of -8.44) from 2018 to 2021. All the 5 questions from the WHO Well-being Index also had an individual significant decrease; with the question regarding interest in life showing the greatest decrease. Individuals reported decreased subjective physical and mental well-being and increased substance use (alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco). Households also reported decreased household incomes and worse household finances since the start of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Using the Community Health Needs Assessment infrastructure, 1 community was able to compare prepandemic with postpandemic data, which showed decreased well-being and increased substance use and financial stress. Other public health planners can similarly conduct interval surveys on the basis of their Community Health Needs Assessment questionnaires to tailor ongoing Community Health Improvement Plan programming to postpandemic needs and track community mental health and well-being recovery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Substance-Related Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Needs Assessment , Pandemics , Public Health , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(5)2022 03 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732015

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a series of biopsychosocial repercussions among nursing professionals. The impossibility of anticipating the events, the numerous deaths, the excessive workload, the lack of personal health and the necessary means of protection made it difficult to regulate the impact and the elaboration of grief to the point of becoming, on many occasions, a traumatic grief whose physical and psychological manifestations are becoming more and more evident. The main objective of this research was to develop a scale for a group of symptoms based on professional traumatic grief. The development consisted of two phases: (I) instrument design through a literature review and focus groups of bereavement experts and healthcare professionals who experience the grief process in their work; and (II) validation of the content of the instrument. A total of 25 final items were established as suitable for inclusion in the instrument. It is expected that the experiences and results obtained through the development and validation of a scale of specific symptomatology of professional traumatic grief in health professionals will allow the assessment and detection of symptomatology in order to develop programs and strategies for early intervention and prevention.


Subject(s)
Bereavement , COVID-19 , Grief , Humans , Needs Assessment , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722823

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Nurses working during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have reported elevated levels of anxiety, burnout and sleep disruption. Hospital administrators are in a unique position to mitigate or exacerbate stressful working conditions. The goal of this study was to capture the recommendations of nurses providing frontline care during the pandemic. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Semi-structured interviews were conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, with 36 nurses living in Canada and working in Canada or the United States. FINDINGS: The following recommendations were identified from reflexive thematic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) The nurses emphasized the need for a leadership style that embodied visibility, availability and careful planning. (2) Information overload contributed to stress, and participants appealed for clear, consistent and transparent communication. (3) A more resilient healthcare supply chain was required to safeguard the distribution of equipment, supplies and medications. (4) Clear communication of policies related to sick leave, pay equity and workload was necessary. (5) Equity should be considered, particularly with regard to redeployment. (6) Nurses wanted psychological support offered by trusted providers, managers and peers. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Over-reliance on employee assistance programmes and other individualized approaches to virtual care were not well-received. An integrative systems-based approach is needed to address the multifaceted mental health outcomes and reduce the deleterious impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the nursing workforce. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Results of this study capture the recommendations made by nurses during in-depth interviews conducted early in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Health Services , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Canada , Communication , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Leadership , Male , Needs Assessment , Organizational Policy , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sick Leave , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , United States , Workload
20.
Front Public Health ; 9: 748666, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690371

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Regular collection and monitoring of data describing the dynamics of the utilization of healthcare services, especially in teaching hospitals (TH), which provide model quality medical services, are critical for COVID-19 pandemic preparedness. METHODS: The researchers analyzed data and information derived from service statistics reports from June 1st to July 15th, 2020 in terms of hospital resources, as well as utilization patterns of beds, ICU, and ventilators, for 11 screening hospitals affiliated with the General Organization of Teaching Hospitals and institutes in Egypt assigned by the Ministry of Health and Population to provide medical care for COVID-19 patients. Hospital indicators in terms of COVID-19 screening services, as well as utilization patterns of inpatient beds, ICU beds, and ventilators were computed. RESULTS: A total of 78,869 non-medical personnel and 2,176 medical personnel were presented with COVID-19 triage symptoms. Investigations conducted in the targeted 11 hospitals delineated that 22.2% of non-medical personnel and 27.9% of medical personnel were COVID-19 PCR-confirmed cases. The inpatient bed occupancy rate was 70% for non-medical patients and 67% for medical staff patients. For ICU, the bed occupancy rate was 92 % for non-medical patients and 88% for medical patients. Among the confirmed cases, 38% of medical patients utilized a ventilator vs. 36% of medical personnel cases. Hospital ranking according to utilization pattern among non-medical personnel, Hospital H ranked first in terms of the high load of screening services. Hospital C ranked first regarding the number of confirmed cases, whereas Hospital D ranked first for high ICU utilization among all teaching hospital ICU cases. With respect to medical personnel, Hospital G ranked first for the high load of screening services for the total studied cases. Hospital G ranked first for the number of confirmed cases. Hospital B ranked first regarding high ICU utilization among all teaching hospital ICU cases. CONCLUSION: Teaching hospitals have demonstrated preparedness for the COVID-19 pandemic by maintaining an inpatient bed occupancy rate of 70% or less and ventilator utilization at <40% of confirmed cases. However, the ICU bed occupancy rate was more than 90% indicating a shortage of resources. In addition, there is variance across hospitals regarding caseload for resource reallocation decisions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Egypt/epidemiology , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Needs Assessment , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
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