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2.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0267410, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1883697

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In the context of the COVID-19 outbreak, the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines Rapid Reaction Group provided recommendations to manage muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) based on priority levels: neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) should be avoided for patients with T2-3N0M0 MIBC. This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the efficacy of NAC compared with radical cystectomy (RC) alone in improving the overall survival (OS) of patients with T2-4aN0M0 MIBC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines. The PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched. The primary outcome was OS of patients with T2-4aN0M0 MIBC, and the secondary outcome was OS of patients with only T2N0M0 MIBC. RESULTS: Eight studies were included in this meta-analysis. Overall, the quality of all studies was relatively high, and little publication bias was demonstrated. The OS was significantly better in the NAC with RC group than in RC alone (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.68-0.92; p = 0.002). A subgroup analysis was performed on only patients with T2N0M0 MIBC, and five studies were included. There was no difference in the OS between the NAC with RC and the RC alone groups (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.69-1.01 p = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: As recommended by the EAU guidelines Rapid Reaction Group, patients with T2N0M0 MIBC should strongly consider omitting NAC until the end of the COVID-19 pandemic. Whether to omit NAC in T3-4aN0M0 MIBC needs further discussion, and studies targeting only T2-3N0M0 MIBC are expected to proceed further.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms , Urology , Cystectomy , Female , Humans , Male , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Invasiveness , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/drug therapy , Urinary Bladder Neoplasms/surgery
3.
JAMA Surg ; 156(4): 398, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1733824
5.
Surgery ; 171(5): 1209-1214, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692860

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has significantly impacted healthcare worldwide. Lack of screening and limited access to healthcare has delayed diagnosis and treatment of various malignancies. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic on sphincter-preserving surgery in patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: This was a single-center retrospective study of patients undergoing surgery for newly diagnosed rectal cancer. Patients operated on during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic (March 2020-February 2021) comprised the study group (COVID-19 era), while patients operated on prior to the pandemic (March 2016-February 2020) served as the control group (pre-COVID-19). RESULTS: This study included 234 patients diagnosed with rectal cancer; 180 (77%) patients in the pre-COVID-19 group and 54 patients (23%) in the COVID-19-era group. There were no differences between the groups in terms of mean patient age, sex, or body mass index. The COVID-19-era group presented with a significantly higher rate of locally advanced disease (stage T3/T4 79% vs 58%; P = .02) and metastatic disease (9% vs 3%; P = .05). The COVID-19-era group also had a much higher percentage of patients treated with total neoadjuvant therapy (52% vs 15%; P = .001) and showed a significantly lower rate of sphincter-preserving surgery (73% vs 86%; P = .028). Time from diagnosis to surgery in this group was also significantly longer (median 272 vs 146 days; P < .0001). CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing surgery for rectal cancer during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic presented later and at a more advanced stage. They were more likely to be treated with total neoadjuvant therapy and were less likely candidates for sphincter-preserving surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rectal Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Rectal Neoplasms/pathology , Rectal Neoplasms/surgery , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
6.
Clin Cancer Res ; 27(16): 4486-4490, 2021 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691214

ABSTRACT

While COVID-19 vaccine distribution has addressed vulnerabilities related to age and comorbidities, there is a need to ensure vaccination of patients with cancer receiving experimental and routine treatment, where interruption of treatment by infection is likely to result in inferior outcomes. Among patients with cancer, those undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) or adjuvant chemotherapy (Adj chemo) for early breast cancer (EBC) are at particularly high risk for inferior outcomes, in part, because optimal timing of chemotherapy is essential for promoting distant disease-free survival. COVID-19 data from the ongoing multicenter I-SPY 2 trial of NAC for EBC provides a window into the magnitude of the problem of treatment interruption, not only for the trial itself but also for routine Adj chemo. In the I-SPY 2 trial, 4.5% of patients had disruption of therapy by COVID-19, prior to wide vaccine availability, suggesting that nationally up to 5,700 patients with EBC were at risk for adverse outcomes from COVID-19 infection in 2020. To address this problem, vaccine education and public engagement are essential to overcome hesitancy, while equity of distribution is needed to address access. To accomplish these goals, healthcare organizations (HCO) need to not only call out disinformation but also engage the public with vaccine education and find common ground for vaccine acceptance, while partnering with state/local governments to improve efficiency of vaccine distribution. These approaches are important to improve trial access and to reduce susceptibility to COVID-19, as the pandemic could continue to impact access to clinical trials and routine cancer treatment.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination , Clinical Trials as Topic , Female , Health Education , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Neoadjuvant Therapy
7.
Breast ; 62 Suppl 1: S17-S24, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611638

ABSTRACT

Neoadjuvant treatment (NAT) has become an option in early stage (stage I-II) breast cancer (EBC). New advances in systemic and targeted therapies have increased rates of pathologic complete response increasing the number of patients undergoing NAT. Clear benefits of NAT are downstaging the tumor and the axillary nodes to de-escalate surgery and to evaluate response to treatment. Selection of patients for NAT in EBC rely in several factors that are related to patient characteristics (i.e, age and comorbidities), to tumor histology, to stage at diagnosis and to the potential changes in surgical or adjuvant treatments when NAT is administered. Imaging and histologic confirmation is performed to assess extent of disease y to confirm diagnosis. Besides mammogram and ultrasound, functional breast imaging MRI has been incorporated to better predict treatment response and residual disease. Contrast enhanced mammogram (CEM), shear wave elastography (SWE), or Dynamic Optical Breast Imaging (DOBI) are emerging techniques under investigation for assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy as well as for predicting response. Surgical plan should be delineated after NAT taking into account baseline characteristics, tumor response and patient desire. In the COVID era, we have witnessed also the increasing use of NAT in patients who may be directed to surgery, unable to have it performed as surgery has been reserved for emergency cases only.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Axilla/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Female , Humans , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Neoadjuvant Therapy/methods , Neoplasm Staging
8.
Breast Dis ; 41(1): 1-3, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604128

ABSTRACT

During the first hit of SARS-COVID pandemic, an important reorganization of Healthcare Services has been done, and new protocols and pathways to protect frail patients like oncological patients were designed. The second hit of pandemic had stressed these new pathways and suggests to health-workers some improvements for safer management of patents.We reported our experience in organizing the clinical pathway of neoadjuvant therapy candidate patients based on the execution of sentinel lympho-node biopsy and the placement of implantable venous access port in the same access to operating room before neoadjuvant chemotherapy suggesting a possible organizational model. In the period October-December 2020 we have included in this new type of path twelve patients and we have not registered any cases of COVID among the patients included. We think this new path, adopted amid the second hit, will be useful for all Breast Units that are facing the challenge of guaranteeing the highest standards of care in a historical moment where the health emergency occupies the efforts of health workers and the economic resources of health systems.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Catheterization, Central Venous/methods , Infection Control/methods , Patient Safety , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Catheterization, Central Venous/instrumentation , Catheterization, Central Venous/standards , Central Venous Catheters , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Critical Pathways , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Mastectomy , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Staging , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/standards
9.
Clin Colorectal Cancer ; 21(2): e117-e125, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540465

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, multiple changes to the provision of cancer care has been introduced to maximize patient safety and protect staff. We aimed to identify factors influencing clinicians' decision on treatment modification during the initial phase of the pandemic, and to assess its impact on outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Electronic records of patients seen in a large United Kingdom tertiary cancer center was reviewed. The frequency and type of changes to systemic anticancer therapy , as well as the factors predicting clinicians' decision were assessed. RESULTS: A total of 418 patients; mean age 63 ± 12 years and 57% male were included. More than half of the patients had modification to their treatment; with treatment delay (21%) or cancellation (10%), being the most common. Majority of patients on neoadjuvant treatment (97%) proceeded with treatment, with some form of treatment modification in 20%. Half of patients on adjuvant treatment had their treatment plan modified. Overall, a change in treatment was more likely in older patients (OR 1.028 [95% CI 1.010-1.047]; P = .002), and in patients who had already received higher number of cycles of systemic anticancer therapy (OR 1.040 [95% CI 1.016-1.065]; P = .001). A change in treatment was less likely further out of the first national lockdown (OR 0.837 [95% CI 0.758-0.925]; P < .001). Patients on third-line treatment were most likely to have alterations to their treatment plan (69%, n=33/48). CONCLUSION: During the first wave of COVID-19 in the United Kingdom, clinicians adapted clinical practice in accordance to local and national guidance, especially amongst older patients and those on third-line treatment. Further real-world data are needed to document the important impact of changes to treatment on outcomes in patients with cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Aged , Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Pandemics
10.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 29(4): 2231-2239, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528704

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic caused delays in breast cancer management forcing clinicians to potentially alter treatment recommendations. This study compared breast cancer stage at diagnosis and rates of neoadjuvant therapy among women presenting to our institution before and during COVID-19. METHODS: Retrospective chart review of patients with a new breast cancer diagnosis from March 2020-August 2020 (during-COVID-19) were compared with March 2019-August 2019 (pre-COVID-19). We compared stage at diagnosis, clinical/demographic features, and neoadjuvant therapy use between the time periods. RESULTS: A total of 573 patients included: 376 pre-COVID-19, 197 during-COVID-19. Method of cancer detection was by imaging in 66% versus 63% and by physical findings/symptoms in 34% versus 37% of patients comparing pre-COVID-19 to during-COVID-19, p = 0.47. Overall clinical prognostic stage did not differ significantly (p = 0.39) between the time periods, nor did cM1 disease (2% in each period); 23% pre-COVID-19 and 27% during-COVID-19 presented with cN+ disease (p = 0.38). Neoadjuvant therapy use was significantly higher during-COVID-19 (39%) versus pre-COVID-19 (29%, p = 0.02) driven by increased neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET) use (7% to 16%, p = 0.002), whereas neoadjuvant chemotherapy use did not change (22% vs. 23%, p = 0.72). In HR+/HER2- disease, NET use increased from 10% pre-COVID-19 to 23% during-COVID-19 (p = 0.001) with a significant increase in stage I patients (7 to 22%, p < 0.001) and nonsignificant increases in stage II (18 to 23%, p = 0.63) and stage III (9 to 29%, p = 0.29). CONCLUSIONS: Breast cancer stage at diagnosis did not differ significantly during-COVID-19 compared with pre-COVID-19. More patients during-COVID-19 were treated with NET, which was significantly increased in stage I HR+/HER2- disease.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Pandemics , Receptor, ErbB-2 , Retrospective Studies
11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 710375, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518483

ABSTRACT

The unique environment of the lungs is protected by complex immune interactions. Human lung tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM) have been shown to position at the pathogen entry points and play an essential role in fighting against viral and bacterial pathogens at the frontline through direct mechanisms and also by orchestrating the adaptive immune system through crosstalk. Recent evidence suggests that TRM cells also play a vital part in slowing down carcinogenesis and preventing the spread of solid tumors. Less beneficially, lung TRM cells can promote pathologic inflammation, causing chronic airway inflammatory changes such as asthma and fibrosis. TRM cells from infiltrating recipient T cells may also mediate allograft immunopathology, hence lung damage in patients after lung transplantations. Several therapeutic strategies targeting TRM cells have been developed. This review will summarize recent advances in understanding the establishment and maintenance of TRM cells in the lung, describe their roles in different lung diseases, and discuss how the TRM cells may guide future immunotherapies targeting infectious diseases, cancers and pathologic immune responses.


Subject(s)
Lung Diseases/immunology , Lung/immunology , /immunology , Animals , Humans , Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating/immunology , Mice , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Vaccines/immunology
12.
Technol Cancer Res Treat ; 20: 15330338211035037, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oncotype Dx (ODx) is a genomic assay which estimates the risk of distant recurrence and predicts adjuvant chemotherapy benefit in early stage breast cancer patients. Most ODx data is derived from excisional specimens. AIM: We assess the utility of ODx on core needle biopsies (CNB) and measure its impact on neoadjuvant treatment decisions, particularly in patients with clinically complicated situations. METHODS: Consecutive ODx results on breast CNBs with invasive carcinoma from 2012-2020 at 3 tertiary care hospitals with dedicated Breast Health Centers were reviewed. Clinical indications to perform ODx on CNB were recorded through a review of patients' electronic medical records. Clinicopathologic features, surgical or oncologic modalities and follow-up data were recorded. RESULTS: Three distinct clinical indications for performing ODx on CNB in 85 ER+ invasive breast carcinomas were identified: 1) Excisions with insufficient tissue to perform ODx, 2) adjudicate neoadjuvant therapy versus primary surgical resection, and 3) select neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) versus neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET). Primary surgery was selected in patients with low score RS (<18), and NET was preferred in patients with intermediate or high RS (>18). NET was preferred over NAC in patients with low RS (<18). CONCLUSION: This study shows that CNB ODx RS helps guide treatment decisions in a neoadjuvant setting along with other contributing factors such as the presence of pathogenic mutations, node positivity, patient age, and comorbidities. The use of ODx on CNB is furthermore valuable in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic for early breast cancer patients to administer effective therapy in a timely manner.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms, Male/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/diagnosis , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Biopsy, Large-Core Needle , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms, Male/pathology , Carcinoma , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/pathology , Combined Modality Therapy , Electronic Health Records , Female , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Genomics , Hormones/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Medical Oncology , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Invasiveness , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
13.
Surgery ; 171(3): 666-672, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, guidelines recommended that breast cancer centers delay estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer surgeries with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. We aimed to evaluate pathologic upstaging of breast cancer patients affected by these guidelines. METHODS: Female patients with stage I/II breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant endocrine therapy were prospectively identified and were matched to a historical cohort of stage I/II estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with upfront surgery ≤35 days. Primary outcomes were pathologic T and N upstaging versus clinical staging. RESULTS: After matching, 28 neoadjuvant endocrine therapy and 48 control patients remained. Median age in each group was 65 (P = .68). Most patients (78.6% and 79.2%) had invasive ductal carcinoma with a clinical tumor size of 0.9 cm vs 1.7 cm (P = .056). Time to surgery was 68 days in the neoadjuvant endocrine therapy group and 26.5 days in the control (P < .001). A total of 23 neoadjuvant endocrine therapy patients (82.1%) had the same or lower pT-stage compared with 31 (64.5%) control patients (P = .115). Only 3 (10.7%) neoadjuvant endocrine therapy patients had increased pN-stage vs 14 (29.2%) control patients (P = .063). CONCLUSION: Despite 2.5-times longer delays, patients with early-stage estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant endocrine therapy did not experience pathologic upstaging during the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings may support the use of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy in similar patients if delays to surgery are projected.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/metabolism , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Mastectomy/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Prospective Studies , Receptors, Estrogen/metabolism
14.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 363, 2021 10 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477449

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Zinc is a trace element that plays a role in stimulating innate and acquired immunity. The role of zinc in critically ill patients with COVID-19 remains unclear. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of zinc sulfate as adjunctive therapy in critically ill patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Patients aged ≥ 18 years with COVID-19 who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in two tertiary hospitals in Saudi Arabia were retrospectively assessed for zinc use from March 1, 2020 until March 31, 2021. After propensity score matching (1:1 ratio) based on the selected criteria, we assessed the association of zinc used as adjunctive therapy with the 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes included the in-hospital mortality, ventilator free days, ICU length of stay (LOS), hospital LOS, and complication (s) during ICU stay. RESULTS: A total of 164 patients were included, 82 patients received zinc. Patients who received zinc sulfate as adjunctive therapy have a lower 30-day mortality (HR 0.52, CI 0.29, 0.92; p = 0.03). On the other hand, the in-hospital mortality was not statistically significant between the two groups (HR 0.64, CI 0.37-1.10; p = 0.11). Zinc sulfate use was associated with a lower odds of acute kidney injury development during ICU stay (OR 0.46 CI 0.19-1.06; p = 0.07); however, it did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSION: The use of zinc sulfate as an additional treatment in critically ill COVID-19 patients may improve survival. Furthermore, zinc supplementation may have a protective effect on the kidneys.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Neoadjuvant Therapy/methods , Zinc Sulfate/therapeutic use , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , Saudi Arabia , Survival Rate
15.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 29(3): 1683-1691, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463293

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Surgical delays are associated with invasive cancer for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). During the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET) was used as a bridge until postponed surgeries resumed. This study sought to determine the impact of NET on the rate of invasive cancer for patients with a diagnosis of DCIS who have a surgical delay compared with those not treated with NET. METHODS: Using the National Cancer Database, the study identified women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+) DCIS. The presence of invasion on final pathology was evaluated after stratifying by receipt of NET and by intervals based on time from diagnosis to surgery (≤30, 31-60, 61-90, 91-120, or 121-365 days). RESULTS: Of 109,990 women identified with HR+ DCIS, 276 (0.3%) underwent NET. The mean duration of NET was 74.4 days. The overall unadjusted rate of invasive cancer was similar between those who received NET ((15.6%) and those who did not (12.3%) (p = 0.10). In the multivariable analysis, neither the use nor the duration of NET were independently associated with invasion, but the trend across time-to-surgery categories demonstrated a higher rate of upgrade to invasive cancer in the no-NET group (p < 0.001), but not in the NET group (p = 0.97). CONCLUSIONS: This analysis of a pre-COVID cohort showed evidence for a protective effect of NET in HR+ DCIS against the development of invasive cancer as the preoperative delay increased, although an appropriately powered prospective trial is needed for a definitive answer.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/surgery , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/surgery , Female , Humans , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Am Surg ; 88(3): 471-479, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has required new treatment paradigms to limit exposures and optimize hospital resources, including the use of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NAET) as bridging therapy for HR+/HER2-invasive tumors and DCIS. While this approach has been used in locally advanced disease, it is unclear how it may affect outcomes in resectable HR+/HER2- tumors. METHODS: Women ≥18 years diagnosed with in situ (Tis) or non-metastatic HR+/HER2- breast cancer from March-May 2019 and 2020 were included. Fisher's exact test and two-sample t test were used to compare baseline characteristics and surgical outcomes between strata. Sub-analysis was performed between patients who received primary surgery vs a bridging NAET approach. RESULTS: Despite similar clinical characteristics, patients in 2019 were more likely to have a surgery-first approach (75% vs 42%, P-value = .0007), receive surgery sooner (22 vs 29 days, P-value < .001), and within 60 days from diagnosis date (100% vs 85%, P-value = .0301). Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy was a more prevalent approach in 2020 (48% vs 7%, P-value < .0001). Rates of clinical to pathologic up-staging remained consistent across primary surgery vs bridging NAET subgroups (P-value = .9253). DISCUSSION: Pandemic-driven treatment protocols provide a unique opportunity to assess the utility of bridging endocrine therapy for resectable HR+/HER2- tumors. Differences in clinical and pathologic staging were similar across groups and did not appear to be affected by receipt of NAET. Our limited cohort demonstrates this strategic therapeutic avenue can optimize health care utilization and may be a reasonable approach when delaying surgery is preferred.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/drug therapy , Neoadjuvant Therapy/methods , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/chemistry , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/chemistry , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/pathology , Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating/surgery , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , North Carolina , Probability , Receptor, ErbB-2 , Receptors, Estrogen , Receptors, Progesterone , Treatment Outcome
17.
Med Oncol ; 38(11): 137, 2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439757

ABSTRACT

The covid-19 pandemic has impacted the management of non-covid-19 illnesses. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) requires long-duration multidisciplinary treatment. Teleconsultation and shared care are suggested solutions to mitigate the consequences of the pandemic. However, these may be challenging to implement among patients who come from the lower economic strata. We report the disastrous impact of the pandemic on the care of EOC by comparing patients who were treated during the pandemic with those treated in the previous year. We collected the following data from newly diagnosed patients with EOC: time from diagnosis to treatment, time for completion of planned chemotherapy, and proportion of patients completing various components of therapy (surgery and chemotherapy). Patients treated between January 2019 and September 2019 (Group 1: Pre-covid) were compared with those treated between January 2020 and December 2020 (Group 2: During covid pandemic). A total of 82 patients were registered [Group 1: 43(51%) Group 2: 39(49)]. The median time from diagnosis to start of treatment was longer in group 2 when compared to group 1 [31(23-58) days versus 17(11-30) days (p = 0.03)]. The proportion of patients who had surgery in group 2 was lower in comparison to group 1 [33(77%) versus 21(54%) (p = 0.02)]. Proportion of patients who underwent neoadjuvant (NACT) and surgery were fewer in group 2 in comparison to group 1 [9(33%) versus 18(64%) p = 0.002]. Among patients planned for adjuvant chemotherapy, the median time from diagnosis to treatment was longer in group 2 [28(17-45) days, group 1 versus 49(26-78) days, group 2 (p = 0.04)]. The treatment of patients with EOC was adversely impacted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. There was a compromise in the proportion of patients completing planned therapy. Even among those who completed the treatment, there were considerable delays when compared with the pre-covid period. The impact of these compromises on the outcomes will be known with longer follow-up.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial/therapy , Neoadjuvant Therapy/methods , Ovarian Neoplasms/therapy , Patient Care/methods , Time-to-Treatment , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy/trends , Ovarian Neoplasms/diagnosis , Ovarian Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Care/trends , Retrospective Studies , Time-to-Treatment/trends
18.
Anticancer Res ; 41(9): 4535-4542, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395532

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, many scientific committees proposed neoadjuvant therapy (NACT) bridging treatment as a novel strategy and indication. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on breast cancer patients undergoing NACT. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All breast cancer patients referred to two Breast Units during COVID-19-pandemic were enrolled. RESULTS: Out of 814 patients, 43(5.3%) were enrolled in the COVID-19-group and compared with 94 (7.9%) similar Pre-COVID-19 patients. We observed a reduction in the number of patients undergoing NACT, p=0.0019. No difference was reported in terms of clinical presentation, indications, and tumor response. In contrast, a higher number of vascular adverse events was reported (6.9% vs. 0% p=0.029). Immediate breast cancer reconstructions following invasive surgery suffered a significant slowdown (5.9% vs. 47.7%, p=0.019). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 caused a reduction in the number of patients undergoing NACT, with no changes in terms of indications, clinical presentation, and tumor response. Furthermore, there was an increased incidence of vascular events.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mammaplasty/statistics & numerical data , Neoadjuvant Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/administration & dosage , Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/adverse effects , COVID-19/complications , Drug Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy/adverse effects , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
19.
Curr Oncol ; 28(2): 1338-1347, 2021 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348609

ABSTRACT

Practice and behaviour change in healthcare is complex, and requires a set of critical steps that would be needed to implement and sustain the change. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer is traditionally used for locally advanced disease and is primarily advantageous for surgical downstaging purposes. However, it does also offer patients with certain biologic subtypes such as the triple negative or Her2 positive breast cancers the opportunity to improve survival, even in early stage disease. During the height of the pandemic, an opportunity and motivation for the increased use of neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer was identified. This paper describes the conditions that have supported this practice change at the provider and institutional levels. We also include our own institutional algorithm based on tumor biology and extent of disease that have guided our decisions on breast cancer management during the pandemic. Our processes can be adapted by other institutions and breast oncology practices in accordance with local conditions and resources, during and beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Receptor, ErbB-2
20.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 28(13): 8729-8739, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317136

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Randomized clinical trials support deescalation of axillary surgery in breast cancer patients with low-volume axillary disease treated with a surgery-first approach. However, few data exist to guide axillary surgery following neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET). Therefore, we evaluated the extent and outcomes of axillary surgery in a contemporary cohort of NET patients, a treatment approach that has become particularly relevant during the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We identified invasive breast cancer patients treated with NET between October 2008 and November 2019. Patients presenting with stage IV disease or recurrent disease were excluded. Statistical analyses were performed using chi-square, Fisher's exact, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. RESULTS: 194 invasive breast cancers in 186 patients (median age 66 years) were evaluated; 81 patients had breast-conserving surgery (BCS), while 113 underwent mastectomy. Eighty-four patients (43.3%) were biopsy-proven cN+ with 4/84 (4.8%) ypN0 following NET. Among cN+ patients, 14 (16.7%) had sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) only, 27 (32.1%) had SLNB + axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), and 43 (51.2%) had ALND. Among 110 cN0 patients, 99 had axillary surgery with 28/99 (28.3%) ypN+: SLNB in 83 (75.5%), SLNB+ALND in 14 (12.7%), and ALND in 2 (1.8%). Among all ypN+ patients, 23/108 (21.3%) had SLNB alone: 18/43 (41.9%) of BCS and 5/65 (7.7%) mastectomy patients (p < 0.001). After median follow-up of 35 months, no regional recurrences were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Among biopsy-proven cN+ NET patients, we observed deescalation of axillary surgery in selected patients, despite a low nodal pathologic complete response (pCR) rate, without nodal recurrences. These data suggest that patients with low-volume axillary disease treated with NET may be managed similarly to patients treated with a surgery-first approach.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Aged , Axilla , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Humans , Lymph Node Excision , Mastectomy , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/drug therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy
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