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1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 15(6)2022 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879123

ABSTRACT

Inborn errors of metabolism constitute a differential diagnosis in infants presenting with encephalopathy in developing countries where expanded newborn screening is not a state health programme. Acute neurological presentation with encephalopathy is documented in paediatric COVID-19. The pandemic has also altered parents' healthcare-seeking behaviour, leading to delays in emergency care. We illustrate the challenges faced in diagnosing and managing an 18-month-old child who presented with acute metabolic crisis due to methylmalonic acidaemia on the background of the COVID-19 pandemic. We discuss the current global status of expanded newborn screening services for inborn error of metabolism and the impact of the pandemic on the healthcare of children.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases , COVID-19 , Metabolism, Inborn Errors , Child , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Metabolism, Inborn Errors/complications , Metabolism, Inborn Errors/diagnosis , Neonatal Screening , Pandemics
2.
BMJ Glob Health ; 7(3)2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832421

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The global COVID-19 pandemic has presented extraordinary disruption to healthcare services and exposed them to numerous challenges. Newborn screening (NBS) programmes were also affected; however, scarce data exist on the impact of COVID-19 on NBS. METHODS: We conducted an international survey to assess the global impact of COVID-19 on NBS, with the main aim of gathering the experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic from a large and representative number of NBS centres worldwide. RESULTS: The results of our study showed that COVID-19 impacted the NBS programmes, at least partially, in 29 out of 38 responding countries. Majority of the screening centres experienced a broad spectrum of difficulties and most were affected more in the second wave of the pandemic. Delays and unreliability with the postal service as well as flight cancellations caused delays in samples arriving to screening centres and with the provision of laboratory equipment and reagents. The availability of laboratory staff was sometimes reduced due to infection, quarantine or reassignment within the healthcare facility. Sample collection at home, second-tier tests and follow-up were also affected. Social restrictions and interruptions in public transport added to these difficulties. Only a limited number of centres managed to retain a fully functioning NBS programme. CONCLUSION: As the pandemic might continue or could recur in future years, it would be useful to develop guidelines to protect these valuable services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Neonatal Screening , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Neoreviews ; 23(3): e212-e215, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753234
5.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(2): 103379, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664635

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 infection can cause a wide spectrum of symptoms. The audio-vestibular system can also be involved, but there is still debate about this so findings need to be considered carefully. Furthermore, mother to fetus intrauterine transmission of COVID-19 infection in pregnant women is controversial. Few studies are available about the audio-vestibular symptomatology of newborns with intrauterine COVID19 exposure. OBJECTIVES: This study investigates the possible correlation between the COVID19 gestational infection and hearing impairment onset in newborns. The involvement of hearing in COVID19 is verified so the timing and methodology of audiological evaluation of children can be planned. METHODS: Children were subject to newborn hearing screening and audiological evaluation. Newborn hearing screening is carried out prior to hospital discharge using the Automatic Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions test. Audiological evaluation is performed within the child age of 4 months by using maternal, pregnancy, and perinatal case history, COVID19 case history, otoscopy, acoustic immittance test, Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions test, and the Auditory Brainstem Response test. RESULTS: 63 children were included in the study. 82.5% of these children were subjects of the newborn hearing screening program. The remaining 11 newborns were not subjected to hearing screening due to isolation measures and their audiological evaluation was carried out directly. Only one of 52 screened neonates showed a bilateral REFER test result but hearing threshold was normal at audiological evaluation. Audiological evaluation showed normal bilateral ABR thresholds in 59/63 children. Four children (6.3% of the total) had ABR threshold alterations but two showed normal threshold at ABR retest performed within 1 month of the first. The other two infants showed monolateral ABR alterations but one of these had a concomitant middle ear effusion. In conclusion, only one child (1.6% of the sample) had an altered ABR. This child had shown one positive SARS-CoV-2 swab in the absence of risk factors for hearing loss. CONCLUSION: This study finds no evidence that maternal COVID19 infection is a risk factor in the development of congenital hearing loss in newborns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mothers , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem , Female , Hearing Tests/methods , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Neonatal Screening/methods , Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous/physiology , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594182

ABSTRACT

The study aim was to explore the effects of multisensory breastmilk interventions on short-term pain of infants during newborn screening. This is a randomized controlled trial. A total of 120 newborns were recruited and assigned by randomization to one of three treatment conditions: Condition 1 = routine care (gentle touch + verbal comfort); Condition 2 = breastmilk odor + routine care; or Condition 3 = breastmilk odor + taste + routine care. Pain was scored with the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS). Data were collected from video recordings at 1 min intervals over the 11 phases of heel sticks: phase 1, 5 min before heel stick without stimuli (baseline); phase 2 to phase 6 (during heel stick); and phase 7 to phase 11 (recovery). Generalized estimating equations compared differences in pain scores for newborns over phases among the three conditions. Compared with the routine care, provision of the odor and taste of breastmilk reduce NIPS scores during heel sticks (B = -4.36, SE = 0.45, p < 0.001 [phase6]), and during recovery (B = -3.29, SE = 0.42, p < 0.001 [phase7]). Our findings provide new data, which supports the use of multisensory interventions that include breastmilk odor and taste in combination with gentle touch and verbal comfort to relieve pain in infants undergoing newborn screening.


Subject(s)
Milk, Human , Neonatal Screening , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Pain/diagnosis , Pain/prevention & control , Pain Management
7.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 166(4): 603-604, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582718

ABSTRACT

Early detection and intervention for congenital hearing loss are critical for speech and language development. Newborns should receive hearing screening, diagnosis, and intervention by 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused delays in each step of this process. Increased out-of-hospital births and shortages of essential health care services likely reduced the proportion of newborns completing screening. Additional factors have contributed to delayed diagnosis. We estimate that up to 50% of infants born with hearing loss in Maryland in 2021 may be delayed in diagnosis. Hearing loss interventions have been affected due to delayed initiation, reduced availability, and lack of in-person services. Delayed diagnosis and treatment of congenital hearing loss are likely to have significant effects on individual patients and public health, the full magnitude of which will not be known for years. Opportunities exist for providers to mitigate the negative effects of COVID-19 on pediatric hearing health care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Hearing , Hearing Tests , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Neonatal Screening , Pandemics
8.
Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina ; 52(S2): S17-S22, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574804

ABSTRACT

Artificial intelligence (AI) applications are diverse and serve varied functions in clinical practice. The most successful products today are clinical decision tools used by physicians, but autonomous AI is gaining traction. Widespread use of AI is limited in part because of concerns about bias, fault-tolerance, and specificity. Adoption of AI often depends on removing cost and complexity in clinical workflow integration, providing clear incentives for use, and providing clear demonstration of clinical outcome. Existing wide-angle photographic screening could be integrated into the clinical workflow based on prior implementations for premature babies and linked with AI interpretation with existing technology. Incidence of retinal abnormality, clinical considerations, AI performance, grading variation for AI-augmented human grading, and cost and policy aspects play a significant role. Improved outcomes for newborns and a relatively high estimated incidence of abnormality have been named as benefits to counterweigh costs in the long term. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2021;52:S17-S22.].


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Retina , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Neonatal Screening , Photography
9.
Ear Hear ; 43(1): 41-44, 2021 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528197

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Viral infections are known to be a risk factor for neonatal hearing loss. COVID-19 infection has been reported to affect hearing test results in one small sample sized study. We aimed to investigate the incidence the risk of neonatal hearing loss in infants of mothers who had COVID-19 infection during pregnancy, regarding their trimesters, by evaluating the neonatal hearing screening results. DESIGN: In this retrospective case-control study, neonatal hearing test results of 458 women with a history of COVID-19 infection in pregnancy were compared with 339 women who gave birth before the pandemic. Data of pregnant women who attended the COVID-19 outpatient clinic of the emergency service of a tertiary pandemic hospital and who had confirmed infection with a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test were determined from the hospital's records and their neonatal hearing screening results were analyzed from the national database. Neonates born before <34 weeks, and with reported risk factors in the database such as congenital anomaly or known TORCH infection during pregnancy were excluded. The screening tests, Automated Auditory Brainstem Response or Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission (TEOAE), were used for screening, and patients who failed the first screening were reevaluated at least 2 weeks apart with a second screening. RESULTS: The incidence of failed second screening was 1.3% in the COVID-19 group and 2.9% in controls, and no significant difference was observed between the two groups according to the final screening results on the second test. Among the 458 mothers, 8 were infected in first trimester, 126 in second trimester, 127 in third trimester but did not deliver within 15 days after infection and 197 were positive at birth. Six neonates in the infected group failed the second screening (3 [2.4%] in the second trimester, 1 [0.8%] third trimester, and 2 [1.0%] positive at birth). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 infection during pregnancy was not found to be a risk factor for hearing loss, according to the newborn hearing screening results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem , Female , Hearing Tests , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Mothers , Neonatal Screening , Otoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneous , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol ; 58(6): 900-908, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439712

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vertical transmission has been investigated extensively. Recently, the World Health Organization (WHO) published strict criteria to classify the timing of mother-to-child transmission of SARS-CoV-2 into different categories. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of vertical transmission in asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2-positive women. METHODS: Pregnant women attending for delivery at a perinatology center in Mexico City, Mexico, who had a SARS-CoV-2-positive nasopharyngeal swab 24-48 h before delivery, were asymptomatic at the time of the test and had an obstetric indication for Cesarean section were eligible for inclusion in this study. Amniotic fluid was collected during Cesarean delivery, and neonatal oral and rectal swabs were collected at birth and at 24 h after birth. SARS-CoV-2 detection was carried out using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in all samples. Relevant medical information was retrieved from clinical records. The WHO criteria for classifying the timing of mother-to-child transmission of SARS-CoV-2 were applied to the study population. RESULTS: Forty-two SARS-CoV-2-positive asymptomatic pregnant women fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Twenty-five (59%) women developed mild disease after discharge. Neonatal death occurred in three (7%) cases, of which one had a positive SARS-CoV-2 test at birth and none had coronavirus disease 2019-related symptoms. There were five (12%) cases with strong evidence of intrauterine transmission of SARS-CoV-2, according to the WHO criteria, as amniotic fluid samples and neonatal samples at birth and at 24 h after birth were positive for SARS-CoV-2. Our results also showed that 40-60% of infected neonates would have been undetected if only one swab (oral or rectal) was tested. CONCLUSION: This study contributes evidence to reinforce the potential for vertical transmission of SARS-CoV-2 even in asymptomatic women and highlights the importance of testing more than one neonatal sample in order to increase the detection rate of SARS-CoV-2 in affected cases. © 2021 The Authors. Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , Cesarean Section , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Neonatal Screening , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
11.
J Paediatr Child Health ; 58(2): 288-294, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406577

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to determine the feasibility and parental acceptability of screening for congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) through saliva polymerase chain reaction in infants who did not pass their newborn hearing screening. Additionally, the utility (i.e. time to diagnosis and treatment) of this enhanced clinical pathway was evaluated. METHODS: The study was conducted through the Victorian Infant Hearing Screening Programme (VIHSP) across four maternity hospitals in Melbourne, Australia, during June 2019-March 2020. Parents were approached by VIHSP staff about obtaining a test for cytomegalovirus (CMV) at the time of their baby's second positive ('refer') result on the VIHSP screen. Participating parents collected a saliva swab for CMV polymerase chain reaction from their infants. Feasibility was determined by the proportion of 'referred' infants whose parents completed the salivary CMV screening test ≤21 days of life. Acceptability was measured through parent survey. RESULTS: Of 126 eligible families, 96 (76.0%) had salivary screening swabs taken ≤21 days of life. Most families (>92.0%) indicated that screening was acceptable, straightforward and thought testing their baby for cCMV was a good idea. One infant screened positive on day 30, was diagnosed with cCMV via confirmatory testing by day 31 and commenced valganciclovir on day 32. CONCLUSIONS: Obtaining a saliva sample to screen for cCMV in infants who do not pass their newborn hearing screen is feasible and appears acceptable to parents. This targeted cCMV screening method could be an option where mothers are rapidly discharged from hospital, especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cytomegalovirus , Feasibility Studies , Female , Hearing , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Neonatal Screening , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
12.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e050773, 2021 08 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376508

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To implement and evaluate co-designed interventions to improve communication of positive newborn bloodspot screening results and make recommendations for future research and practice. DESIGN: A process evaluation underpinned by Normalisation Process Theory. SETTING: Three National Health Service provider organisations in England. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-four healthcare professionals (7 newborn screening laboratory staff and 24 clinicians) and 18 parents were interviewed. INTERVENTIONS: Three co-designed interventions were implemented in practice: standardised laboratory proformas, communication checklists and an email/letter template. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Acceptability and feasibility of the co-designed interventions. RESULTS: Auditing the implementation of these interventions revealed between 58%-76% of the items on the laboratory proforma and 43%-80% of items on the communication checklists were completed. Interviews with healthcare professionals who had used the interventions in practice provided positive feedback in relation to the purpose of the interventions and the ease of completion both of which were viewed as enhancing communication of positive newborn bloodspot screening results. Interviews with parents highlighted the perceived benefit of the co-designed interventions in terms of consistency, pacing and tailoring of information as well as providing reliable information to families following communication of the positive newborn bloodspot screening result. The process evaluation illuminated organisational and contextual barriers during implementation of the co-designed interventions in practice. CONCLUSION: Variations in communication practices for positive newborn bloodspot screening results continue to exist. The co-designed interventions could help to standardise communication of positive newborn screening results from laboratories to clinicians and from clinicians to parents which in turn could improve parents' experience of receiving a positive newborn bloodspot screening result. Implementation highlighted some organisational and contextual barriers to effective adoption of the co-designed interventions in practice. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN15330120.


Subject(s)
Neonatal Screening , State Medicine , Communication , Health Personnel , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Parents
13.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int ; 28(35): 47685-47688, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349331

ABSTRACT

Nearly two-thirds of migrants residing in camps in Europe are women and children. Many of these children, being born on the way without essential newborns screening, are at some point admitted to pediatric wards in asylum countries. With hospitals overwhelmed with COVID-19 cases, taking appropriate care of newborns becomes a considerable burden. In this frame, prevention, in the form of adequate newborn screening, emerges as a better and more feasible strategy than healing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Mediterranean Region , Neonatal Screening , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Perinat Med ; 49(6): 643-649, 2021 Jul 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266569

ABSTRACT

After more than 1 year of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, a great deal of knowledge on how this virus affects pregnant women, the fetus and the newborn has accumulated. The gap between different guidelines how to handle newborn infants during this pandemic has been minimized, and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)'s recommendations are now more in accordance with those of the World Health Organization (WHO). In this article we summarize present knowledge regarding transmission from mother to the fetus/newborn. Although both vertical and horizontal transmission are rare, SARS-CoV-2 positivity is associated with an increased risk of premature delivery and higher neonatal mortality and morbidity. Mode of delivery and cord clamping routines should not be affected by the mother's SARS-CoV-2 status. Skin to skin contact, rooming in and breastfeeding are recommended with necessary hygiene precautions. Antibodies of infected or vaccinated women seem to cross both the placenta and into breast milk and likely provide protection for the newborn.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Breast Feeding , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery, Obstetric , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care, Neonatal , Milk, Human/immunology , Neonatal Screening , Patient Discharge , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Resuscitation , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
15.
BMC Ophthalmol ; 21(1): 258, 2021 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266480

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic, due to the traffic blockade and the shortage of medical resources, more and more premature infants could not receive timely and effective ROP screening, which delayed treatment and even caused children blindness. Therefore, how to carry out ROP screening safely and effectively during the epidemic was very important and urgent. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and feasibility of ROP screening assisted by telemedicine network during COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: This retrospective study was conducted at Wuhan Children's hospital in Wuhan, China, from January to October, 2020. The measures which were performed to make the ROP screening more safe and effective were summarized and the comparison between ROP screening assisted by telemedicine network in 2020 and usual screening in 2019 were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 267 outpatient infants completed ROP screening. The median gestational age was 32 weeks (30w to 34w) and the median birth weight was 1780 g (1460 g to 2100 g). Meanwhile, 149 (55.8%) out of 267 infants were males. During January to May in 2020, 86 screening appointments were received, among which 67 (77.9%) were from telemedicine platform online. The completing percentage of total online ROP appointments was higher than that of total face-to-face appointments (58.1% VS 22. 1%, P = 0.018). As for the number of infants screened between 2020 and 2019 from Februaryto October, 54 infants completed ROP screening in 2020, which was higher than that (51participants) in 2019 on September. Furthermore, compared with the usual screening in 2019, ROP screening assisted by telemedicine network in 2020 had smaller gestational age (32w VS 33w, p<0.001) and lower birth weight (1780 g VS 1900 g, p = 0.001). However, of the 267 infants screened, 18(6.7%) had ROP while the percentage of ROP screened in 2019 was the same (44[6.7%]). During follow-up, none of medical staffs was infected and no adverse reaction was reported. CONCLUSIONS: The screening for retinopathy of prematurity assisted by telemedicine network was safe and feasible during the COVID-19 pandemic. Preventive measures before and after screening were very necessary, which could effectively avoid cross infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Retinopathy of Prematurity , Telemedicine , Child , China/epidemiology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Gestational Age , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Neonatal Screening , Pandemics , Retinopathy of Prematurity/diagnosis , Retinopathy of Prematurity/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(10): 1010-1022, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254105

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The new coronavirus infection from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been recognized as a global public health emergency, and neonates may be more vulnerable due to their immature immune system. The first aim of this study was to report our experience on the management of neonates from mothers with SARS-CoV-2 infection focusing on a 28-day follow-up since birth. The second aim is to assess how many data on neonatal outcomes of the first month of life are reported in literature, performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. STUDY DESIGN: We report our experience based on routine management of neonates born to mothers with SARS-CoV-2 infection and follow-up until 28 days of life. RESULTS: In our experience at discharge, 1/48 (2.08%) of entrusted (mother refusing personal protective equipment) and none of separated presented positive nasopharyngeal swab (p = NS). All babies show good outcome at 28 days of life. The literature data show that the percentage of positive separated infants is significantly higher than the percentage of infants entrusted to positive mothers with appropriate control measures (13.63 vs. 2.4%; p = 0.0017). Meta-analysis of studies focused on follow-up showed a 2.94% higher risk of incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in entrusted newborns than in separated newborns (95% confidence interval: 0.39-22.25), but this was not significant (p = 0.30). CONCLUSION: A vertical transmission in utero cannot be totally excluded. Since in newborns, the disease is often ambiguous with mild or absent symptoms, it is important to define the most efficient joint management for infants born to COVID-19 positive mothers, being aware that the risk of horizontal transmission from a positive mother, when protective measures are applied, does not seem to increase the risk of infection or to affect the development of newborns from birth to first four weeks of life, and encourages the benefits of breastfeeding and skin-to-skin practice. KEY POINTS: · Entrusting the newborn to the positive mother does not increase the risk of infection.. · Our follow-up shows that newborns have good growth and outcome at one month of life.. · Applying protective measures we suggest breastfeeding and skin-to-skin practice..


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Adult , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Neonatal Screening/methods , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pregnancy , Symptom Assessment/methods
17.
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol ; 146: 110754, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213280

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The current study aimed to investigate possible association of maternal SARS-CoV-2 with newborn hearing loss. We compared hearing screening outcomes in neonates born to women with positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test results during pregnancy with healthy controls. METHODS: Neonates born between April and December 2020 in our hospital to mothers with positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test results during pregnancy were included in this study. Neonates with risk factors for universal newborn hearing screening (NHS) were excluded. Neonates born to mothers with positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test results during pregnancy were compared with healthy controls in terms of newborn hearing screening results and independent variables. RESULTS: Neonates in the COVID-19 group were more likely to have a "refer" result in auditory brainstem responses (ABR) compared with the control group (53/118 and 28/118, respectively; p = 0.001). The second ABR test results did not differ significantly between the groups (p = 0.618). Logistic regression revealed that birth week and type of birth were not associated with the "refer" result. PCR positivity in the second trimester was more likely to produce the "refer" result in the first ABR test (p = 0.014). CONCLUSION: SARS-CoV-2 PCR positivity in pregnancy is significantly associated with an increased risk of abnormal NHS results. Also, the timing of PCR positivity in pregnancy (trimester) may be related to abnormal NHS results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hearing Disorders/diagnosis , Hearing Tests , Neonatal Screening , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem , Female , Hearing Disorders/virology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Perinatol ; 41(5): 970-980, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118798

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The impact of evolving guidelines and clinical practices on SARS-CoV-2-positive dyads across New York City Health and Hospitals during the early peak of COVID-19. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study of positive-positive (P/P), positive-negative (P/N), and positive-untested (P/U) dyads delivered from March 1 to May 9, 2020. Wilcoxon rank sum, Chi-squared, and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze demographics, clinical variables, and system-wide management practices. RESULT: A total of 2598 mothers delivered. 23.8% (286/1198) of mothers tested for SARS-CoV-2 were positive. 89.7% (260/290) newborns of SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers were tested and 11 were positive. Positive-positive newborns were more likely to be breastfed (81%), be admitted to NICU, and have longer length of stay (7.5 days) than P/N and P/U newborns. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that varied testing, feeding, and isolation practices resulted in favorable short-term outcomes for SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers and their newborns. High-risk populations can be safely and effectively treated in resource-limited environments.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care, Neonatal/statistics & numerical data , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Neonatal Screening/methods , New York City/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
19.
Pan Afr Med J ; 37: 299, 2020.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1115558

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: the implementation of neonatal screening to identify infants with sickle cell disease during the COVID-19 pandemic is a major challenge in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The purpose of this study is to determine whether socio-economic factors are associated with acceptability of newborn screening to identify infants with sickle cell disease during the COVID-19 pandemic in Kisangani, DRC. METHODS: we conducted an observational study of mothers sensitized to neonatal screening to detect sickle cell disease in their newborns with hemotypeSCTM (HT401RUO-USA). The study was carried out at the maternity wards in Kisangani from March 21st to June 30th 2020. Collected data were parity, educational level, age, socio-economic level, occupation, awareness and the reason for the denial of screening. RESULTS: out of 55.5% (273/492) of sensitized mothers, 107 (39.19%) accepted and 166 (60.80%) refused neonatal screening to detect sickle cell disease in their newborn. The reasons for refusal were lack of information (67.5%; 95% CI [59.8-74.5]), lack of money due to confinement (66.3%; 95% CI [58.5-73.4]), blood test to develop a vaccine for protection against COVID-19 (63.2%; 95% CI = [55.4-70.6]). Factors associated with the acceptability of screening were age > 35 years (p = 0.0009; ORa = 3.04; 95% CI = 1.57-5.87) and low socio-economic level (p = 0.0016; ORa = 2.29; 95% CI = 1.37-3.85). CONCLUSION: the acceptability of neonatal screening to detect sickle cell disease during COVID-19 is low in Kisangani. The government should identify effective communication channels to promote health care initiatives.


Subject(s)
Anemia, Sickle Cell/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Neonatal Screening/methods , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Communication , Democratic Republic of the Congo , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Mothers/statistics & numerical data , Socioeconomic Factors , Treatment Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
20.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(1): 21-27, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065743

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate the feasibility of continuing cochlear implantation during the coronavirus disease 2019 crisis and to report on trends of referrals via the neonatal hearing screening programme. METHODS: A prospective case series was conducted on children who underwent cochlear implantation during the coronavirus disease 2019 crisis in the UK and a sample of referrals via the neonatal hearing screening programme. A step-by-step description of peri-operative management is included. RESULTS: Regionally, between February and May 2020, 106 babies were referred via the neonatal hearing screening programme to paediatric audiology. Eleven children were operated on during the coronavirus disease 2019 study period. None of the 11 children developed coronavirus symptoms. DISCUSSION: It is widely recognised that the demands of managing the current pandemic may compromise screening, clinical assessment and elective surgery. Time-sensitive issues such as cancer management have gained prominence, but a similar need exists for timely paediatric cochlear implantation. CONCLUSION: Implantation in the paediatric population during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is feasible with careful planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cochlear Implantation , Deafness/surgery , Neonatal Screening , Child, Preschool , Cochlear Implantation/statistics & numerical data , Feasibility Studies , Female , Hearing Tests , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation/trends , United Kingdom
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