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1.
J Thromb Haemost ; 19(12): 2918-2929, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526389

ABSTRACT

Determining patient's coagulation profile, i.e. detecting a bleeding tendency or the opposite, a thrombotic risk, is crucial for clinicians in many situations. Routine coagulation assays and even more specialized tests may not allow a relevant characterization of the hemostatic balance. In contrast, thrombin generation assay (TGA) is a global assay allowing the dynamic continuous and simultaneous recording of the combined effects of both thrombin generation and thrombin inactivation. TGA thus reflects the result of procoagulant and anticoagulant activities in blood and plasma. Because of this unique feature, TGA has been widely used in a wide array of settings from both research, clinical and pharmaceutical perspectives. This includes diagnosis, prognosis, prophylaxis, and treatment of inherited and acquired bleeding and thrombotic disorders. In addition, TGA has been shown to provide relevant information for the diagnosis of coagulopathies induced by infectious diseases, comprising also disturbance of the coagulation system in COVID-19, or for the assessment of early recurrence in breast cancer. This review article aims to document most clinical applications of TGA.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombin , Blood Coagulation Tests , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , SARS-CoV-2
2.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(11)2021 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522936

ABSTRACT

After radical nephrectomy, clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) recurs locally in <3% of patients. Recurrences typically occur 1-2 years postoperatively and grow at 5-20 mm per year. In contrast, this patient's recurrence was unexpectedly large and swift. A 71-year-old woman was initially found on workup for recurrent urinary tract infections to have a 12 cm left renal tumour. After negative staging scans, she progressed to left open radical nephrectomy. Histology revealed a stage T2b 12 cm ccRCCwith sarcomatoid differentiation, International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grade 4, with clear margins. Only 3 months later, the patient developed left-sided abdominal pain, and CT scans revealed a 15 cm left retroperitoneal local recurrence, as well as widespread peritoneal tumours. In discussion with her treating team, the patient and her family elected not to undergo biopsy or systemic therapy. The patient was palliated and passed away 8 days after re-presentation.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Renal Cell , Kidney Neoplasms , Aged , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/diagnostic imaging , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Female , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/surgery , Nephrectomy , Treatment Outcome
4.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(11)2021 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503863

ABSTRACT

Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterised by isolated thrombocytopenia which may be idiopathic or due to a secondary aetiology. ITP is being increasingly recognised secondary to SARS-CoV-2 infection in the current pandemic. Here, we report a case of a five-and-a-half-year-old female child on maintenance chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who subsequently developed ITP secondary to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our patient had prolonged thrombocytopenia secondary to ITP, requiring the use of second-line agents including romiplostim and eltrombopag. This is a unique case where ITP was recognised secondary to SARS-CoV-2. In such cases of thrombocytopenia, ITP should be considered as an important differential in addition to relapse of leukaemia or thrombocytopenia due to chemotherapy drugs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/complications , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/drug therapy , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/complications , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/diagnosis , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
5.
JCO Clin Cancer Inform ; 5: 1096-1105, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502035

ABSTRACT

Multiple myeloma (MM) is associated with the highest symptom burden and lowest health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with hematologic malignancies. HRQoL in MM is heterogeneous, varying over the course of disease, with the highest burden at diagnosis and relapse. Patients with MM are increasingly being treated with oral maintenance medications at home. As a result, longitudinal monitoring of medication adherence and patient-reported outcomes, including HRQoL, could inform on disease status, therapeutic tolerability, and satisfaction with care. Digital health technologies, including telemedicine, mobile health, and wearable devices, are poised to become an integral part of modern health care, in part due to the surge in telemedicine necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the literature has many reports on the use of digital health technologies in other types of cancers, fewer studies report on their application to MM. In the current narrative review, we survey the applications of digital health for MM. Although there is evidence that some are associated with improved health outcomes, challenges exist that must be met to ensure more widespread adoption. These include the need for increased awareness by patients and health care providers, lack of access by the typical older patient with MM, absence of randomized clinical trials, and low integration with current workflows such as electronic health records. Following our summary of technologies that could benefit patients with MM, we end by describing our vision for how they can be integrated into each phase of the patient journey.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Myeloma , Humans , Multiple Myeloma/diagnosis , Multiple Myeloma/epidemiology , Multiple Myeloma/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Cardiothorac Surg ; 16(1): 316, 2021 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486586

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The clinical manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) overlap with those of other disorders, especially cardiovascular disease. CASE PRESENTATION: We herein describe a 58-year-old woman who presented with syncopal episodes and dyspnea on exertion with a left atrial (LA) mass, scheduled for surgical removal and mitral valve replacement. Nearly 3 months later, the patient developed dyspnea, fever, and a sore throat, resulting in hospital admission with suspected COVID-19. During the diagnostic evaluation, a larger LA mass was detected. The mass seemed to be a COVID-19-induced organized thrombus with prosthetic mitral valve malfunction. Resection was, therefore, planned. An immunohistochemistry study revealed a liposarcoma. CONCLUSIONS: The unusual early recurrence of liposarcomas and the misdiagnosis with COVID-19-induced thrombosis are the hallmark of the present case.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thrombosis , Diagnostic Errors , Female , Heart Atria/surgery , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/diagnosis
7.
Technol Cancer Res Treat ; 20: 15330338211035037, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Oncotype Dx (ODx) is a genomic assay which estimates the risk of distant recurrence and predicts adjuvant chemotherapy benefit in early stage breast cancer patients. Most ODx data is derived from excisional specimens. AIM: We assess the utility of ODx on core needle biopsies (CNB) and measure its impact on neoadjuvant treatment decisions, particularly in patients with clinically complicated situations. METHODS: Consecutive ODx results on breast CNBs with invasive carcinoma from 2012-2020 at 3 tertiary care hospitals with dedicated Breast Health Centers were reviewed. Clinical indications to perform ODx on CNB were recorded through a review of patients' electronic medical records. Clinicopathologic features, surgical or oncologic modalities and follow-up data were recorded. RESULTS: Three distinct clinical indications for performing ODx on CNB in 85 ER+ invasive breast carcinomas were identified: 1) Excisions with insufficient tissue to perform ODx, 2) adjudicate neoadjuvant therapy versus primary surgical resection, and 3) select neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) versus neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET). Primary surgery was selected in patients with low score RS (<18), and NET was preferred in patients with intermediate or high RS (>18). NET was preferred over NAC in patients with low RS (<18). CONCLUSION: This study shows that CNB ODx RS helps guide treatment decisions in a neoadjuvant setting along with other contributing factors such as the presence of pathogenic mutations, node positivity, patient age, and comorbidities. The use of ODx on CNB is furthermore valuable in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic for early breast cancer patients to administer effective therapy in a timely manner.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms, Male/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/diagnosis , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Biopsy, Large-Core Needle , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms, Male/pathology , Carcinoma , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/pathology , Combined Modality Therapy , Electronic Health Records , Female , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Genomics , Hormones/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Medical Oncology , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Invasiveness , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
8.
Am J Case Rep ; 22: e932765, 2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468751

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Constant stimulation of lymphocytes and histiocytes can result in hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), which can be primary or secondary (sHLH). The main causes of sHLH are infections and hematological malignancies, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Despite new insights into the pathogenesis of HLH, the diagnosis and treatment of this immune disorder remain a great challenge. CASE REPORT We present a case of a young adult without comorbidities whose clinical course was nonspecific for several months and resulted in late diagnosis of HLH secondary to peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL). The etiological factor of recurring fever, hepatosplenomegaly, and deteriorating condition was unidentified for a long time before fatal sHLH was finally diagnosed. The patient was treated according to the HLH-2004 protocol; however, he did not achieve any response. Unfortunately, due to nonspecific symptoms, lack of lymphadenopathy for a long time, and negative positron emission tomography results, the diagnosis of PTCL was established only after the patient's death. CONCLUSIONS It should be emphasized that early diagnosis is crucial for better prognosis of patients with sHLH. Bone marrow biopsy is worth considering in patients with prolonged fever of unknown origin, hyperferritinemia, splenomegaly, and unexplained cytopenia of 2 or more lineages. Despite the existence of diagnostic and therapeutic protocols available in the literature, the prompt diagnosis and treatment of HLH remains a great challenge. More precise and specific diagnostic tools for HLH are needed.


Subject(s)
Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral , Bone Marrow , Fever , Humans , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/diagnosis , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/etiology , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral/complications , Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral/diagnosis , Male , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Young Adult
9.
BMC Cancer ; 21(1): 1094, 2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To ensure safe delivery of oncologic care during the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has been rapidly adopted. However, little data exist on the impact of telemedicine on quality and accessibility of oncologic care. This study assessed whether conducting an office visit for thoracic oncology patients via telemedicine affected time to treatment initiation and accessibility. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with thoracic malignancies seen by a multidisciplinary team during the first surge of COVID-19 cases in Philadelphia (March 1 to June 30, 2020). Patients with an index visit for a new phase of care, defined as a new diagnosis, local recurrence, or newly discovered metastatic disease, were included. RESULTS: 240 distinct patients with thoracic malignancies were seen: 132 patients (55.0%) were seen initially in-person vs 108 (45.0%) via telemedicine. The majority of visits were for a diagnosis of a new thoracic cancer (87.5%). Among newly diagnosed patients referred to the thoracic oncology team, the median time from referral to initial visit was significantly shorter amongst the patients seen via telemedicine vs. in-person (median 5.0 vs. 6.5 days, p < 0.001). Patients received surgery (32.5%), radiation (24.2%), or systemic therapy (30.4%). Time from initial visit to treatment initiation by modality did not differ by telemedicine vs in-person: surgery (22 vs 16 days, p = 0.47), radiation (27.5 vs 27.5 days, p = 0.86, systemic therapy (15 vs 13 days, p = 0.45). CONCLUSIONS: Rapid adoption of telemedicine allowed timely delivery of oncologic care during the initial surge of the COVID19 pandemic by a thoracic oncology multi-disciplinary clinic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , Pandemics , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Thoracic Neoplasms/therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Patient Care Team , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Quality of Health Care , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Thoracic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Thoracic Neoplasms/pathology , Time Factors
10.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248589, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456066

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess efficacy and safety of imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of Osteoid Osteoma (OO) in both typical and atypical sites. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between January 2014 and March 2019, 102 consecutive percutaneous RFA were performed and retrospectively reviewed. The procedures were performed using a RFA bipolar ablation system (Covidien, exposed tip of 0.7-1cm), under Computed Tomography (CT) guidance or using a navigation system (Masmec) under CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) guidance. Patients were followed up over 24 months. Clinical success and recurrences were considered on the base of established criteria. In patients with clinical failure and/or imaging evidence of relapse, retreatment was considered. RESULTS: Administered power per-procedure was ≤8 W (mean temperature, 90°C). The pre-procedure average value of visual analog scale (VAS) was 8.33+/-0.91. Primary and secondary success rate 96.08% (98/102) and100% (102/102), respectively. No major complication was described. Technical success was proved in every patient by CT scan acquisition after needle positioning. Relapse and tumour location were significantly correlated (p-value = 0.0165). The mean dose-length product was 751.55 mGycm2. Advanced bone healing was noted in 68 lesions after 1y-follow up and in 86 lesions after 2y-follow up. CONCLUSION: Imaging-guided percutaneous RFA is a highly effective technique for OO, both in typical and atypical sites. CT or CBCT guidance, navigation systems and operator experience grant the technical success, which is the most crucial parameter affecting outcome.


Subject(s)
Bone Neoplasms/therapy , Cancer Pain/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Osteoma, Osteoid/therapy , Radiofrequency Ablation/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Bone Neoplasms/complications , Bone Neoplasms/diagnosis , Cancer Pain/diagnosis , Cancer Pain/etiology , Cone-Beam Computed Tomography , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control , Osteoma, Osteoid/complications , Osteoma, Osteoid/diagnosis , Pain Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Radiofrequency Ablation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
11.
Colorectal Dis ; 23(10): 2501-2514, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455531

ABSTRACT

AIM: The objective of this systematic review was to investigate the outcomes of ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) in Crohn's disease and to clarify whether there are any time-related trends in outcome measures. The primary outcomes are risk of anastomotic leakage, death, clinical recurrence and subsequent diverting or permanent stoma and/or proctectomy. Secondary end-points are quality of life and functional outcome. METHODS: Systematic searches were conducted using the Cochrane Library, Embase and MEDLINE. The complete search strategy is uploaded online at http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/. Human studies in English with over five subjects were included and no limit was set regarding the date of publication. All relevant studies were screened by two reviewers. The web-based software platform www.covidence.org was used for primary screening of the title, abstract, full-text review and data extraction. RESULTS: The search identified 2231 unique articles. After the screening process, 37 remained. Key results were an overall anastomotic leak rate of 6.4%; cumulative rates of clinical recurrence of 43% and 67% at 5 and 10 years, respectively; an overall rate of proctectomy of 18.9%; and subsequent ileostomy required in 18.8%. Only one study presented useful data on quality of life. Recurrence rates remained stable over time. A small decline in the anastomotic leak rate was found. CONCLUSIONS: Only minor improvements in the outcomes of IRA in patients with Crohn´s disease have occurred during the past 50 years regarding anastomotic leakage and recurrence, except for a slight increase in the rate of a functioning IRA. These results call for implementation guidelines in patient selection for IRA and postoperative medical treatment and follow-up.


Subject(s)
Crohn Disease , Anastomosis, Surgical/adverse effects , Colectomy , Crohn Disease/surgery , Humans , Ileum/surgery , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Quality of Life , Rectum/surgery , Retrospective Studies
12.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 32(1): 33-38, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454337

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine effect of body mass index (BMI) on safety and cancer-related outcomes of thermal ablation for renal cell carcinoma (RRC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study evaluated 427 patients (287 men and 140 women; mean [SD] age, 72 [12] y) who were treated with thermal ablation for RCC between October 2006 and December 2017. Patients were stratified by BMI into 3 categories: normal weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2), and obese (≥ 30 kg/m2). Of 427 patients, 71 (16%) were normal weight, 157 (37%) were overweight, and 199 (47%) were obese. Complication rates, local recurrence, and residual disease were compared in the 3 cohorts. RESULTS: No differences in technical success between normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients were identified (P = .72). Primary technique efficacy rates for normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients were 91%, 94%, and 93% (P = .71). There was no significant difference in RCC specific-free survival, disease-free survival, and metastasis-free survival between obese, overweight, and normal-weight groups (P = .72, P = .43, P = .99). Complication rates between the 3 cohorts were similar (normal weight 4%, overweight 2%, obese 3%; P = .71). CONCLUSIONS: CT-guided renal ablation is safe, feasible, and effective regardless of BMI.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Cryosurgery , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Microwaves/therapeutic use , Obesity/diagnosis , Radiofrequency Ablation , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/mortality , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/secondary , Cryosurgery/adverse effects , Cryosurgery/mortality , Disease Progression , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Microwaves/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Obesity/mortality , Patient Safety , Radiofrequency Ablation/adverse effects , Radiofrequency Ablation/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
13.
Obstet Gynecol ; 135(5): 1070-1083, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455363

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy of adjuvant human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in preventing recurrent cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2 or greater after surgical excision. DATA SOURCES: Electronic databases (Cochrane, PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Scopus, and ClinicalTrials.gov) were searched for studies comparing surgical excision alone to surgical excision with adjuvant HPV vaccination for CIN 2 or greater. Studies published from January 1990 to January 2019 were included. METHODS: A total of 5,901 studies were reviewed. The primary outcomes evaluated included: recurrence of CIN 2 or greater, CIN 1 or greater, and HPV 16,18 associated CIN within 6-48 months. We used Covidence software to assist with screening, and meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager. TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS: Six studies met inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. In total 2,984 women were included; 1,360 (45.6%) received adjuvant HPV vaccination after surgical excision, and 1,624 (54.4%) received either placebo or surgical management alone for CIN 2 or greater. Recurrence of CIN 2 or greater occurred within 6-48 months in 115 women (3.9%) overall; however, recurrence was significantly lower for vaccinated women: 26 of 1,360 women (1.9%) vs 89 of 1,624 unvaccinated women (5.9%) (relative risk [RR] 0.36 95% CI 0.23-0.55). The risk of CIN 1 or greater was also significantly lower with adjuvant HPV vaccination, occurring in 86 of 1,360 vaccinated women (6.3%) vs 157 of 1,624 unvaccinated women (9.7%) (RR 0.67 95% CI 0.52-0.85). Thirty-five women developed recurrent CIN 2 or greater lesions specific to HPV 16,18; nine received adjuvant vaccination (0.9%) vs 26 who were unvaccinated (2.0%) (RR 0.41 95% CI 0.20-0.85). CONCLUSION: Adjuvant HPV vaccination in the setting of surgical excision for CIN 2 or greater is associated with a reduced risk of recurrent cervical dysplasia overall and a reduction in the risk of recurrent lesions caused by the most oncogenic strains (HPV 16,18). Human papillomavirus vaccination should therefore be considered for adjuvant treatment in patients undergoing surgical excision for CIN 2 or greater. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO, CRD42019123786.


Subject(s)
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/drug therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/complications , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/drug therapy , Adult , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/surgery , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/virology , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/virology , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Treatment Outcome , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/surgery , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/virology , Young Adult
14.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(9)2021 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440811

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a novel disease often presenting with a cough, fever or a change in smell or taste. Recently, it has been recognised that COVID-19 may result in multisystemic issues and thus cause atypical symptoms, which can cause diagnostic delay, uncertainty and inaccuracy. A 60-year-old woman presented to the hospital with a 2-day history of mid-thoracic discomfort, intermittent rigours, fevers and general malaise, a few weeks after likely COVID-19 infection. She was admitted and treated for community-acquired pneumonia. However, her symptoms recurred despite multiple courses of antibiotics, which prompted further workup. A combination of a pleural and pericardial effusion was identified, leading to a diagnosis of polyserositis, and a COVID-19 antibody test came back positive. Colchicine was effective at resolving her symptoms, leading to further conviction of a probable postviral polyserositis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delayed Diagnosis , Female , Fever , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , SARS-CoV-2
15.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(9)2021 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435024

ABSTRACT

Intraosseous schwannoma is extremely rare that it is not often considered among differential diagnosis for an osteolytic lesion, especially in long bones of the extremities. Amounting to less than 0.2% of all primary bone tumours and less than 200 cases reported so far, with only 3 cases involving the humerus, we hereby report the fourth case. In addition to its rarity, this was the only case of an intraosseous schwannoma involving the humerus bone which presented with a pathological fracture in a 45-year-old woman after sustaining a trivial trauma. Radiological examination revealed a geographic type of osteolytic lesion in distal shaft region of the left humerus. Only a histopathological examination helped in revealing and confirming the diagnosis of an intraosseous schwannoma. Treatment of the tumour with complete excision with bone graft reconstruction and osteosynthesis yields good results with very low risk of recurrence.


Subject(s)
Bone Neoplasms , Neurilemmoma , Bone Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Bone Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Humans , Humerus/diagnostic imaging , Humerus/surgery , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Neurilemmoma/diagnostic imaging , Neurilemmoma/surgery , Radiography
16.
Rinsho Ketsueki ; 62(8): 1178-1185, 2021.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404086

ABSTRACT

During the nosocomial coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, patients with hematological disorders showed poorer survival and aggressive course of respiratory failure than patients with other disorders. Two patients with immune thrombocytopenia who were being treated with prednisolone experienced severe respiratory failure related to COVID-19 and finally died. Patients who were yet to achieve remission and those receiving chemotherapy with steroids had a higher risk of death, and the mortality rate was higher in patients with lymphoid malignancies, including lymphoma and myeloma, than in those with myeloid malignancies. We describe the case of a myeloma patient in whom high-dose steroid administration was able to achieve considerable resolution of respiratory failure. In patients with unsuccessful seroconversion of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies, recurrence or re-infection of COVID-19 should be closely monitored.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Front Public Health ; 9: 667379, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389257

ABSTRACT

The 2019-nCOVID pandemic as a public health emergency has faced healthcare systems with unprecedented challenges. Our study aimed to focus on the mental health impact of the 2019-nCOVID pandemic on healthcare workers (HCWs) from North-Eastern Piedmont, Italy. For this purpose, we performed an online survey which was e-mailed to HCWs at the end of the first peak of the pandemic. We involved both frontline and not-frontline HCWs, employed in the hospital or in healthcare services outside the hospital. The primary outcome of our research was the assessment of burnout, while secondary outcomes included the investigation of anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress symptoms. We observed higher levels of burnout (especially in the Depersonalization and Personal Accomplishment dimensions), in females, in HCWs aged <30 years, in those exposed to changes in their daily and family habits, in those who had to change their duties at work and in residents in training. In our HCWs sample we found lower levels of anxiety and depression than those reported in the literature. The problematic levels of burnout and adverse psychological outcomes observed during the pandemic cannot be underestimated. Given the recurrence in autumn 2020 of a new pandemic peak, which has once again put a strain on the health system and HCWs, it is supported the importance of a careful assessment of HCWs' mental health, and of the possible risk and protective factors both in the work environment and in the extra-work one.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Breast ; 59: 301-307, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340566

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To examine clinicodemographic determinants associated with breast cancer survivorship follow-up during COVID-19. METHODS: We performed a retrospective, population-based cohort study including early stage (Stage I-II) breast cancer patients who underwent resection between 2006 and 2018 in a New York City hospital system. The primary outcome was oncologic follow-up prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Secondary analyses compared differences in follow-up by COVID-19 case rates stratified by ZIP code. RESULTS: A total of 2942 patients with early-stage breast cancer were available for analysis. 1588 (54%) of patients had attended follow-up in the year prior to the COVID-19 period but failed to continue to follow-up during the pandemic, either in-person or via telemedicine. 1242 (42%) patients attended a follow-up appointment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Compared with patients who did not present for follow-up during COVID-19, patients who continued their oncologic follow-up during the pandemic were younger (p = 0.049) more likely to have received adjuvant radiation therapy (p = 0.025), and have lower household income (p = 0.031) on multivariate modeling. When patients who live in Bronx, New York, were stratified by ZIP code, there was a modest negative association (r = -0.56) between COVID-19 cases and proportion of patients who continued to follow-up during the COVID-19 period. CONCLUSION: We observed a dramatic disruption in routine breast cancer follow-up during the COVID-19 pandemic. Providers and health systems should emphasize reintegrating patients who missed appointments during COVID-19 back into regular surveillance programs to avoid significant morbidity and mortality from missed breast cancer recurrences.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/mortality , COVID-19/psychology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Survivorship , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospitals, Urban , Humans , Male , Mastectomy , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
19.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(7)2021 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331805

ABSTRACT

The clinical manifestation of novel COVID-19 is variable. Pre-existing carcinoma and other comorbidities have been associated with increased COVID-19-related morbidity and mortality. Surgical intervention for advanced laryngeal carcinoma in old age during the COVID-19 pandemic may pose multiple challenges to the patient and the treatment team. We report a case of a 67-year-old elderly man who developed SARS-CoV-2 infection on the 21st day following total laryngectomy and neck dissection. The postoperative period was complicated by sequential development of pulmonary embolism, neck infection, pharyngeal leak and COVID-19 which were managed successfully. No close contacts were positive on the reverse transcription-PCR test for SARS-CoV-2. The patient is in follow-up for the past 7 months without any recurrence or COVID-19-related morbidity. The successful recovery and no cross-infection may be attributed to early diagnosis, immediate intervention and properly implemented institutional infection control policy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Humans , Laryngectomy , Male , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 19(8): 1520-1530, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317650

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is expected to have a long-lasting impact on the approach to care for patients at risk for and with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to the risks from potential exposure and resource reallocation. The goal of this document is to provide recommendations on HCC surveillance and monitoring, including strategies to limit unnecessary exposure while continuing to provide high-quality care for patients. Publications and guidelines pertaining to the management of HCC during COVID-19 were reviewed for recommendations related to surveillance and monitoring practices, and any available guidance was referenced to support the authors' recommendations when applicable. Existing HCC risk stratification models should be utilized to prioritize imaging resources to those patients at highest risk of incident HCC and recurrence following therapy though surveillance can likely continue as before in settings where COVID-19 prevalence is low and adequate protections are in place. Waitlisted patients who will benefit from urgent LT should be prioritized for surveillance whereas it would be reasonable to extend surveillance interval by a short period in HCC patients with lower risk tumor features and those more than 2 years since their last treatment. For patients eligible for systemic therapy, the treatment regimen should be dictated by the risk of COVID-19 associated with route of administration, monitoring and treatment of adverse events, within the context of relative treatment efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , alpha-Fetoproteins
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