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1.
Clin Otolaryngol ; 47(5): 561-567, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1874404

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To report the incidence of locoregional recurrence in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients under surveillance following treatment undergoing symptom-based remote assessment. DESIGN: A 16-week multicentre prospective cohort study. SETTING: UK ENT departments. PARTICIPANTS: HNC patients under surveillance following treatment undergoing symptom-based telephone assessment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of locoregional recurrent HNC after minimum 6-month follow-up. RESULTS: Data for 1078 cases were submitted by 16 centres, with follow-up data completed in 98.9% (n = 1066). Following telephone consultation, 83.7% of referrals had their face-to-face appointments deferred (n = 897/1072). New symptoms were reported by 11.6% (n = 124/1072) at telephone assessment; 72.6% (n = 90/124) of this group were called for urgent assessments, of whom 48.9% (n = 44/90) came directly for imaging without preceding clinical review. The sensitivity and specificity for new symptoms as an indicator of cancer recurrence were 35.3% and 89.4%, respectively, with a negative predictive value of 99.7% (p = .002). Locoregional cancer identification rates after a minimum of 6 months of further monitoring, when correlated with time since treatment, were 6.0% (n = 14/233) <1 year; 2.1% (n = 16/747) between 1 and 5 years; and 4.3% (n = 4/92) for those >5 years since treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Telephone assessment, using patient-reported symptoms, to identify recurrent locoregional HNC was widely adopted during the initial peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United Kingdom. The majority of patients had no face-to-face reviews or investigations. New symptoms were significantly associated with the identification of locoregional recurrent cancers with a high specificity, but a low sensitivity may limit symptom assessment being used as the sole surveillance method.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Head and Neck Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/therapy , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation , Symptom Assessment , Telephone
2.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(4): 344-347, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146477

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This prospective study aimed to evaluate possible diagnostic delays in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma recurrences due to the changed follow-up protocol during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: The follow-up appointments of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated more than one year prior to the pandemic were changed to telephone appointments in order to reduce physical visits to the hospital. All contacts, reasons for contact and recurrent cancers were recorded. RESULTS: There were 17 recurrences during a seven-month study period among 178 patients treated in the previous year (10 per cent); 14 of these recurrences occurred in patients whose treatment had ended less than one year previously and 3 occurred more than one year after treatment had ended. There was no delay in diagnoses of recurrent tumours or treatment despite reduced visits because of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. CONCLUSION: According to our analyses, no delay was caused in the diagnoses of recurrent diseases. Follow up by telephone or telemedicine can be considered as part of the follow-up protocol one year after the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma when necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/diagnosis , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/epidemiology , Finland/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
3.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(5): e141-e143, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121494

ABSTRACT

At the onset of the COVID-19 crisis, a 63-year-old woman with multiple life-limiting comorbidities was referred with a necrotic infected left breast mass on a background of breast cancer treated with conservation surgery and radiotherapy 22 years previously. The clinical diagnosis was locally advanced breast cancer, but four separate biopsies were non-diagnostic. Deteriorating renal function and incipient sepsis and endocarditis resulted in urgent salvage mastectomy during the peak of the COVID19 pandemic. The final diagnosis was infected ischaemic/infarcted breast (wet gangrene) secondary to vascular insufficiency related to diabetes, cardiac revascularisation surgery and breast radiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Breast/surgery , Diabetic Angiopathies/therapy , Enterobacteriaceae Infections/therapy , Gangrene/therapy , Mastectomy/methods , Mastitis/therapy , Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy/methods , Breast/blood supply , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast/diagnosis , Coronary Artery Bypass , Debridement/methods , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetic Angiopathies/diagnosis , Diabetic Angiopathies/etiology , Diagnosis, Differential , Enterobacteriaceae Infections/diagnosis , Female , Gangrene/diagnosis , Humans , Infarction , Mammary Arteries/surgery , Mastectomy, Segmental , Mastitis/diagnosis , Middle Aged , Morganella morganii , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis , Radiotherapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Salvage Therapy
5.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(3): 644-710, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-912072

ABSTRACT

Globally, there has been a measured response to rationalise elective operating during the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In terms of breast cancer care, this has led to a restricted provision of reconstruction with autologous free tissue transfer. A primary concern is the risk of mortality in elective surgery patients who develop COVID-19. The aim of this report is to describe the observed physiological impact of the virus on our patient, and to address how outpatient care after autologous free tissue transfer can be delivered to COVID-19 positive patients. In March 2020, we performed a bilateral breast reconstruction with a deep inferior epigastric perforator flap and a superficial inferior epigastric perforator flap. The patient became symptomatic on day three post-operatively, tested positive for COVID-19 and was discharged home. Drain and dressing management was continued through the use of telemedicine. Two weeks following the operation, a breast seroma formed that was drained semi-electively in the COVID-19 positive area of the Emergency Department. The patient visited the dressing clinic twice in total and healed after three weeks. Despite undergoing complex surgery and having pre-operative chemotherapy, our patient suffered a mild form of the virus limited to upper respiratory symptoms. Physiologically we did not see any significant difference to that of the normal post-operative course. This case demonstrates the possibility of managing autologous breast reconstruction patients using telemedicine. Although COVID-19 can complicate, or even be fatal, in the perioperative course, our patient thankfully suffered no discernable negative outcome from her infection.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Patient Isolation , Postoperative Complications , Aftercare/methods , Aftercare/trends , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Free Tissue Flaps , Humans , Mammaplasty/adverse effects , Mammaplasty/methods , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/surgery , Patient Discharge/trends , Patient Isolation/methods , Patient Isolation/organization & administration , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/physiopathology , Postoperative Complications/therapy , Treatment Outcome , Wound Healing
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