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1.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248589, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456066

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess efficacy and safety of imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of Osteoid Osteoma (OO) in both typical and atypical sites. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between January 2014 and March 2019, 102 consecutive percutaneous RFA were performed and retrospectively reviewed. The procedures were performed using a RFA bipolar ablation system (Covidien, exposed tip of 0.7-1cm), under Computed Tomography (CT) guidance or using a navigation system (Masmec) under CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) guidance. Patients were followed up over 24 months. Clinical success and recurrences were considered on the base of established criteria. In patients with clinical failure and/or imaging evidence of relapse, retreatment was considered. RESULTS: Administered power per-procedure was ≤8 W (mean temperature, 90°C). The pre-procedure average value of visual analog scale (VAS) was 8.33+/-0.91. Primary and secondary success rate 96.08% (98/102) and100% (102/102), respectively. No major complication was described. Technical success was proved in every patient by CT scan acquisition after needle positioning. Relapse and tumour location were significantly correlated (p-value = 0.0165). The mean dose-length product was 751.55 mGycm2. Advanced bone healing was noted in 68 lesions after 1y-follow up and in 86 lesions after 2y-follow up. CONCLUSION: Imaging-guided percutaneous RFA is a highly effective technique for OO, both in typical and atypical sites. CT or CBCT guidance, navigation systems and operator experience grant the technical success, which is the most crucial parameter affecting outcome.


Subject(s)
Bone Neoplasms/therapy , Cancer Pain/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Osteoma, Osteoid/therapy , Radiofrequency Ablation/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Bone Neoplasms/complications , Bone Neoplasms/diagnosis , Cancer Pain/diagnosis , Cancer Pain/etiology , Cone-Beam Computed Tomography , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control , Osteoma, Osteoid/complications , Osteoma, Osteoid/diagnosis , Pain Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Radiofrequency Ablation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
2.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 19(8): 1520-1530, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1317650

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is expected to have a long-lasting impact on the approach to care for patients at risk for and with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to the risks from potential exposure and resource reallocation. The goal of this document is to provide recommendations on HCC surveillance and monitoring, including strategies to limit unnecessary exposure while continuing to provide high-quality care for patients. Publications and guidelines pertaining to the management of HCC during COVID-19 were reviewed for recommendations related to surveillance and monitoring practices, and any available guidance was referenced to support the authors' recommendations when applicable. Existing HCC risk stratification models should be utilized to prioritize imaging resources to those patients at highest risk of incident HCC and recurrence following therapy though surveillance can likely continue as before in settings where COVID-19 prevalence is low and adequate protections are in place. Waitlisted patients who will benefit from urgent LT should be prioritized for surveillance whereas it would be reasonable to extend surveillance interval by a short period in HCC patients with lower risk tumor features and those more than 2 years since their last treatment. For patients eligible for systemic therapy, the treatment regimen should be dictated by the risk of COVID-19 associated with route of administration, monitoring and treatment of adverse events, within the context of relative treatment efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/therapy , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , alpha-Fetoproteins
3.
J Laryngol Otol ; 135(4): 344-347, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146477

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This prospective study aimed to evaluate possible diagnostic delays in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma recurrences due to the changed follow-up protocol during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: The follow-up appointments of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated more than one year prior to the pandemic were changed to telephone appointments in order to reduce physical visits to the hospital. All contacts, reasons for contact and recurrent cancers were recorded. RESULTS: There were 17 recurrences during a seven-month study period among 178 patients treated in the previous year (10 per cent); 14 of these recurrences occurred in patients whose treatment had ended less than one year previously and 3 occurred more than one year after treatment had ended. There was no delay in diagnoses of recurrent tumours or treatment despite reduced visits because of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. CONCLUSION: According to our analyses, no delay was caused in the diagnoses of recurrent diseases. Follow up by telephone or telemedicine can be considered as part of the follow-up protocol one year after the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma when necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/diagnosis , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/diagnosis , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/epidemiology , Finland/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
4.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 278(11): 4441-4448, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081343

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Head and neck cancer (HNC) patients may experience fears regarding cancer recurrence (FoR) and of catching COVID-19. There could be unease for attending hospital clinics for face to face (F2F) examination. F2F benefit in cancer surveillance has to be balanced against the risk of virus transmission. This study aimed to report perceptions of fear of cancer and fear of COVID-19 and to report patient preference for follow-up consultation in HNC survivors during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study ran from lockdown in England on 24th March to 29th July 2020. Patients were offered preference to postpone their consultation, to have it by telephone, or F2F. A postal survey was undertaken in the 2 weeks post-consultation (actual or postponed). RESULTS: There were 103 patients. Initial action by consultant and patient resulted in 51 postponed consultations, 35 telephone consultations and 17 F2F meetings, with 10 F2F triggered by the patient. There were 58 responders to the survey and most (39) had a clear preference for one mode of follow-up consultation during the COVID-19 pandemic, with half (19) preferring F2F. A similar response was seen regarding their consultations in general to address unmet needs and concerns, with 38 having a preferred mode, 29 preferring F2F. Serious fears about recurrence and COVID-19 were at relatively low levels with a tendency to be more concerned about recurrence. CONCLUSION: Any redesign of mode and frequency of out-patient follow-up in light of COVID-19 should be undertaken in discussion with patient groups and with individual patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Fear , Humans , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2
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