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1.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248589, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456066

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess efficacy and safety of imaging-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of Osteoid Osteoma (OO) in both typical and atypical sites. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between January 2014 and March 2019, 102 consecutive percutaneous RFA were performed and retrospectively reviewed. The procedures were performed using a RFA bipolar ablation system (Covidien, exposed tip of 0.7-1cm), under Computed Tomography (CT) guidance or using a navigation system (Masmec) under CT and Cone Beam CT (CBCT) guidance. Patients were followed up over 24 months. Clinical success and recurrences were considered on the base of established criteria. In patients with clinical failure and/or imaging evidence of relapse, retreatment was considered. RESULTS: Administered power per-procedure was ≤8 W (mean temperature, 90°C). The pre-procedure average value of visual analog scale (VAS) was 8.33+/-0.91. Primary and secondary success rate 96.08% (98/102) and100% (102/102), respectively. No major complication was described. Technical success was proved in every patient by CT scan acquisition after needle positioning. Relapse and tumour location were significantly correlated (p-value = 0.0165). The mean dose-length product was 751.55 mGycm2. Advanced bone healing was noted in 68 lesions after 1y-follow up and in 86 lesions after 2y-follow up. CONCLUSION: Imaging-guided percutaneous RFA is a highly effective technique for OO, both in typical and atypical sites. CT or CBCT guidance, navigation systems and operator experience grant the technical success, which is the most crucial parameter affecting outcome.


Subject(s)
Bone Neoplasms/therapy , Cancer Pain/therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Osteoma, Osteoid/therapy , Radiofrequency Ablation/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Bone Neoplasms/complications , Bone Neoplasms/diagnosis , Cancer Pain/diagnosis , Cancer Pain/etiology , Cone-Beam Computed Tomography , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control , Osteoma, Osteoid/complications , Osteoma, Osteoid/diagnosis , Pain Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Radiofrequency Ablation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
2.
Obstet Gynecol ; 135(5): 1070-1083, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455363

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the efficacy of adjuvant human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in preventing recurrent cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2 or greater after surgical excision. DATA SOURCES: Electronic databases (Cochrane, PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Scopus, and ClinicalTrials.gov) were searched for studies comparing surgical excision alone to surgical excision with adjuvant HPV vaccination for CIN 2 or greater. Studies published from January 1990 to January 2019 were included. METHODS: A total of 5,901 studies were reviewed. The primary outcomes evaluated included: recurrence of CIN 2 or greater, CIN 1 or greater, and HPV 16,18 associated CIN within 6-48 months. We used Covidence software to assist with screening, and meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager. TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS: Six studies met inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. In total 2,984 women were included; 1,360 (45.6%) received adjuvant HPV vaccination after surgical excision, and 1,624 (54.4%) received either placebo or surgical management alone for CIN 2 or greater. Recurrence of CIN 2 or greater occurred within 6-48 months in 115 women (3.9%) overall; however, recurrence was significantly lower for vaccinated women: 26 of 1,360 women (1.9%) vs 89 of 1,624 unvaccinated women (5.9%) (relative risk [RR] 0.36 95% CI 0.23-0.55). The risk of CIN 1 or greater was also significantly lower with adjuvant HPV vaccination, occurring in 86 of 1,360 vaccinated women (6.3%) vs 157 of 1,624 unvaccinated women (9.7%) (RR 0.67 95% CI 0.52-0.85). Thirty-five women developed recurrent CIN 2 or greater lesions specific to HPV 16,18; nine received adjuvant vaccination (0.9%) vs 26 who were unvaccinated (2.0%) (RR 0.41 95% CI 0.20-0.85). CONCLUSION: Adjuvant HPV vaccination in the setting of surgical excision for CIN 2 or greater is associated with a reduced risk of recurrent cervical dysplasia overall and a reduction in the risk of recurrent lesions caused by the most oncogenic strains (HPV 16,18). Human papillomavirus vaccination should therefore be considered for adjuvant treatment in patients undergoing surgical excision for CIN 2 or greater. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO, CRD42019123786.


Subject(s)
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/drug therapy , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/complications , Papillomavirus Vaccines/therapeutic use , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/drug therapy , Adult , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/surgery , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/virology , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/virology , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Treatment Outcome , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/surgery , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/virology , Young Adult
3.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 113(11): 1495-1505, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246732

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Fear of recurrence (FoR) is a prevalent concern among breast cancer survivors (BCS), yet few accessible interventions exist. This study evaluated a targeted eHealth intervention, "FoRtitude," to reduce FoR using cognitive behavioral skills training and telecoaching. METHODS: BCS (N = 196) were recruited from an academic medical center and 3 National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program community sites, had stage 0-III breast cancer, were 1-10 years postprimary treatment, with moderate to high FoR and familiarity with the internet. Using the Multiphase Optimization Strategy, participants were independently randomly assigned to 3 cognitive behavioral skills (relaxation, cognitive restructuring, worry practice) vs an attention control condition (health management content [HMC]) and to telecoaching (motivational interviewing) vs no telecoaching. Website content was released across 4 weeks and included didactic lessons, interactive tools, and a text-messaging feature. BCS completed the Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory at baseline and at 4 and 8 weeks. Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory scores over time were compared using mixed-effects models. All statistical tests were 2-sided. RESULTS: FCRI scores [SD] decreased statistically significantly from baseline to postintervention (T0 = 53.1 [17.4], T2 = 41.9 [16.2], P < .001). The magnitude of reduction in FCRI scores was comparable across cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and attention control HMC conditions and was predicted by increased self-efficacy. Telecoaching was associated with lower attrition and greater website use (mean adherence score [SD] = 26.6 [7.2] vs 21.0 [10.5], P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: BCS experienced statistically significant reductions in FoR postintervention, but improvements were comparable between CBT and attention controls. Telecoaching improved adherence and retention. Future research is needed on optimal integration of CBT and HMC, dose, and features of eHealth delivery that contributed to reducing FoR. In the COVID-19 era, remote delivery has become even more essential for reaching survivors struggling with FoR.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Fear/psychology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Quality of Life
4.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 113(4): 355-359, 2021 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-361366

ABSTRACT

Caring for older patients with breast cancer presents unique clinical considerations because of preexisting and competing comorbidity, the potential for treatment-related toxicity, and the consequent impact on functional status. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, treatment decision making for older patients is especially challenging and encourages us to refocus our treatment priorities. While we work to avoid treatment delays and maintain therapeutic benefit, we also need to minimize the risk for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) exposures, myelosuppression, general chemotherapy toxicity, and functional decline. Herein, we propose multidisciplinary care considerations for the aging patient with breast cancer, with the goal to promote a team-based, multidisciplinary treatment approach during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. These considerations remain relevant as we navigate the "new normal" for the approximately 30% of breast cancer patients aged 70 years and older who are diagnosed in the United States annually and for the thousands of older patients living with recurrent and/or metastatic disease.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Interdisciplinary Communication , Medical Oncology/methods , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasm Metastasis/prevention & control , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control , Pandemics , Receptor, ErbB-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , United States
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