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1.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 8: e2200289, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109211

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: A nationwide lockdown was enforced in Brazil starting in March 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic when cancer screening activities were reduced. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on breast cancer (BC) diagnosis. METHODS: We extracted data from the medical records of patients age older than 18 years who were diagnosed with BC and started treatment or follow-up in private oncology institutions in Brazil between 2018 and 2021. The primary objective was to compare the stage distribution during the COVID-19 pandemic (2020-2021) with a historical prepandemic control cohort (2018-2019). Early BC was defined as stage I-II and advanced disease as stage IV. RESULTS: We collected data for 11,753 patients with an initial diagnosis of BC, with 6,493 patients in the pandemic (2020-2021) and 5,260 patients in the prepandemic period (2018-2019). We observed a lower prevalence of early-stage BC (63.6% v 68.4%) and a higher prevalence of advanced-stage BC (16.9 v 12.7%), after the onset of the pandemic (both P < .01). This pattern was similar for both estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive tumors: significantly decreased in the early stage from 69% to 67% and 68% to 58%, respectively, and a considerable increase in advanced-stage disease from 13% to 15% and 13% to 20%, respectively. For triple-negative BC, there was a significantly higher percentage of patients with advanced-stage disease during the pandemic (17% v 11%). Overall, age 50 years or older and postmenopausal status were associated with a greater risk of advanced stage at diagnosis during the pandemic period. CONCLUSION: We observed a substantial increase in the number of cases of advanced-stage BC in Brazil during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Humans , Adolescent , Middle Aged , Female , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics/prevention & control , Brazil/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control
2.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(11)2022 Oct 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082036

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, the European Association of Urology (EAU) Guidelines Office Rapid Reaction Group (GORRG) recommended that patients with clinical stage I (CSI) seminoma be offered active surveillance (AS). This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the efficacy of AS versus adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for improving the overall survival (OS) of CSI seminoma patients. Materials and Methods: A systematic review was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The PubMed/Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched. The primary outcome was 5-year OS, and the secondary outcome was the 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS). The outcomes were analyzed as odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: A total of 14 studies were included. Overall, the quality scores were relatively high, and little publication bias was noted. In terms of the 5-year OS, 7 studies were analyzed; there was no significant difference between AS and adjuvant treatment (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.41-2.39; p = 0.97). In terms of 5-year RFS, 12 studies were analyzed. Adjuvant treatment reduced the risk of 5-year recurrence by 85% compared with AS (OR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.08-0.26; p < 0.001). Conclusions: In terms of the OS in CSI seminoma patients, no intergroup difference was noted, so it is reasonable to offer AS, as recommended by the EAU GORRG until the end of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, since there is a large intergroup difference in the recurrence rate, further research on the long-term (>5 years) outcomes is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Seminoma , Testicular Neoplasms , Urology , Male , Humans , Seminoma/drug therapy , Seminoma/radiotherapy , Testicular Neoplasms/drug therapy , Testicular Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Pandemics , Neoplasm Staging , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/epidemiology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/pathology , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant
3.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0273396, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The incidence of colorectal cancer is rising in adults <50 years of age. As a primarily unscreened population, they may have clinically important delays to diagnosis and treatment. This study aimed to review the literature on delay intervals in patients <50 years with colorectal cancer (CRC), and explore associations between longer intervals and outcomes. METHODS: MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS were searched until December 2, 2021. We included studies published after 1990 reporting any delay interval in adults <50 with CRC. Interval measures and associations with stage at presentation or survival were synthesized and described in a narrative fashion. Risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, Institute of Health Economics Case Series Quality Appraisal Checklist, and the Aarhus Checklist for cancer delay studies. RESULTS: 55 studies representing 188,530 younger CRC patients were included. Most studies used primary data collection (64%), and 47% reported a single center. Sixteen unique intervals were measured. The most common interval was symptom onset to diagnosis (21 studies; N = 2,107). By sample size, diagnosis to treatment start was the most reported interval (12 studies; N = 170,463). Four studies examined symptoms onset to treatment start (total interval). The shortest was a mean of 99.5 days and the longest was a median of 217 days. There was substantial heterogeneity in the measurement of intervals, and quality of reporting. Higher-quality studies were more likely to use cancer registries, and be population-based. In four studies reporting the relationship between intervals and cancer stage or survival, there were no clear associations between longer intervals and adverse outcomes. DISCUSSION: Adults <50 with CRC may have intervals between symptom onset to treatment start greater than 6 months. Studies reporting intervals among younger patients are limited by inconsistent results and heterogeneous reporting. There is insufficient evidence to determine if longer intervals are associated with advanced stage or worse survival. OTHER: This study's protocol was registered with the Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO; registration number CRD42020179707).


Subject(s)
Colorectal Neoplasms , Adult , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Colorectal Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Incidence , Neoplasm Staging , Registries , Systematic Reviews as Topic
4.
Cancer Control ; 29: 10732748221119349, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2020963

ABSTRACT

Management of gynecological cancers has suffered during the pandemic, partly due to lockdown and partly due to directing resources to manage COVID-19 patients. Modification of gynecological cancer management during this pandemic is recommended. Cervical cancer patients who present with stage IA1 disease can have a delay of up to 8 weeks for surgical treatment, considering the slow tumor growth rate. Women with stages IA2, IB1, IB2, IIA1 must undergo radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy within 6 to 8 weeks. In areas where surgical treatment is not available, patients should be referred for radiation therapy/areas with adequate surgical expertise. The surgical option is attractive for early cancers during the COVID era, as it involves a single visit compared to the multiple visits required for chemoradiation. The value of lymph node staging needs to be reconsidered. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy should be given preference over primary cytoreductive surgery for advanced ovarian cancers. Surgeries, which demand extended surgical time such as Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy and pelvic exenterations, should be avoided during this pandemic. For patients scheduled for interval surgery after two or three neoadjuvant cycles, six cycles of chemotherapy should be considered before surgery is performed. For early-stage, low-grade endometrial cancer, consideration should be given to medical management until surgery is possible. The above recommendations have been made keeping in mind the geography, patient load, and availability of resources available to health care providers from southeast Asia. They might not be applicable globally and every practitioner should take call regarding patient's management as per availability of resources and loco-regional circumstances. The implementation of recommended international guidelines for the management of gynecologic cancers should take precedence. Each modification to the standard approach should be approved by a multidisciplinary team depending on the condition of the patients and the locoregional circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Ovarian Neoplasms , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Humans , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics
5.
J Am Coll Surg ; 235(2): 174-184, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001543

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, national guidelines recommended that elective surgery for esophageal cancer be deferred by 3 months when hospital resources are limited. The impact of this delay on patient outcomes is unknown. We sought to evaluate the survival of patients with stage I and II/III esophageal cancer who undergo early vs delayed treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Using the National Cancer Database from 2010 to 2017, multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling and propensity score-matched analysis were employed to compare survival of patients with stage I esophageal cancer who received early (0 to 4 weeks after diagnosis) vs delayed esophagectomy (12 to 16 weeks) and of patients with stage II/III esophageal cancer who-after receiving timely chemoradiation (0 to 4 weeks after diagnosis)-underwent early (9 to 17 weeks) vs delayed esophagectomy (21 to 29 weeks). RESULTS: For stage I esophageal cancer, 226 (41.7%) patients underwent early esophagectomy, and 316 (58.3%) patients underwent delayed esophagectomy. Propensity score matching created 2 groups of 134 patients with early or delayed esophagectomy, whose 5-year survival was comparable (hazard ratio [HR] 65.0% [95% confidence interval (CI) 55.2% to 73.2%] vs HR 65.1% [95% CI 55.6% to 73.1%], p = 0.50). For stage II/III esophageal cancer, 1,236 (86.1%) patients underwent early esophagectomy, and 200 (13.9%) underwent delayed esophagectomy. Propensity score matching created 2 groups of 130 patients; the early esophagectomy group had improved 5-year survival compared with the delayed esophagectomy group (HR 41.6% [95% CI 32.1% to 50.8%] vs HR 22.9% [95% CI 14.9% to 31.8%], p = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Early esophagectomy was associated with similar survival compared with delayed esophagectomy for patients with stage I esophageal cancer. For patients with stage II/III esophageal cancer, early esophagectomy was associated with improved survival relative to delayed esophagectomy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Esophageal Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Esophageal Neoplasms/pathology , Esophagectomy , Humans , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Palliat Care ; 37(3): 317-322, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1986628

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the feasibility and efficacy of palliative radiotherapy dose regimens for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods: Fifty patients of previously untreated, inoperable, stage IVA and IVB squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, deemed unfit for radical treatment, were included in the study from May 2020 to June 2020. Two palliative radiotherapy regimens were used. First was a single fraction radiation with 8 Gy for patients with limited life expectancy and poor performance status, which was repeated after 4 weeks in case of good symptom relief. The second regimen was used for patients with good performance status and consisted of fractionated radiation with 30 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks, which was followed by supplementary radiation with 25 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks in patients with good symptomatic response at 2 weeks. Symptoms were assessed at baseline and at the end of 4 weeks after treatment completion using the numerical rating score. Patients were followed up for a median of 4.5 months and assessed for symptom control and overall survival. Results: Forty-eight patients completed treatment and were included for analysis. Of the 24 patients who received single fraction radiation, 13 (54.2%) were given the second dose. Improvement in pain and dysphagia were reported in 57.9% and 60% patients, respectively. A total of 55.5% noted decrease in size of the neck node. Twenty-four patients received fractionated radiation and 15 (62.5%) were given the second course after 2 weeks. Relief in pain and dysphagia was reported in 68.2% and 63.6% patients, respectively. There were no grade 3/4 toxicities. Symptom control lasted for at least 3 months in 30% of the patients who received single fraction radiation and 54.2% of the patients who received fractionated radiation. The estimated 6-month overall survival of the entire cohort was 51.4%. Conclusion: Judicious use of palliative radiation in advanced incurable head and neck cancers provides effective and durable symptom relief and should be used after careful consideration of patient prognosis, logistics of treatment, and goals of care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Palliative Care , Deglutition Disorders/etiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Humans , Neoplasm Staging , Pain , Pandemics , Radiotherapy , Radiotherapy Dosage
7.
Dtsch Arztebl Int ; 117(42): 717, 2020 10 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383842
8.
J Surg Oncol ; 126(6): 1114-1122, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1965552

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Important differences in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are related to the delay in the diagnosis to the treatment, hospitals' specialised status, comorbidities, tumour stage and histological type. METHODS: A 19-year retrospective cohort study was conducted, including 681 patients with NSCLC in clinical-stage IA-IB. The variables analysed were gender, age, schooling, type of health care provider, type of treatment, period of 5-year treatment, the time between first attendance to diagnosis and the time between diagnosis and treatment, and hospital's specialised status. RESULTS: Patients who underwent radiotherapy alone had three times more risk of death than those who underwent surgery alone (adjusted hazard ratio [adjHR] = 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.45-4.82; p <0.001). The independent risk of death factors was being treated in nonhigh complexity centres in oncology hospitals and having started the treatment more than 2 months after diagnosis (adjHR = 1.80; 95% CI: 1.26-2.56; p <0.001) and (adjHR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.33-3.00; p <0.001), respectively. In addition, the patients diagnosed between 2011 and 2015 had a 40% lower risk of death when compared to those diagnosed between 2000 and 2005 (95% CI: 0.38-0.94; p = 0.027). CONCLUSION: The overall survival in curative intent Stage-I lung cancer patients' treatment was associated with the 5-year diagnosis group, the delayed time between diagnosis and treatment and the hospital qualification.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma of Lung , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Adenocarcinoma of Lung/pathology , Adenocarcinoma of Lung/therapy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Cohort Studies , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies
12.
BMJ ; 377: o1421, 2022 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1891793
13.
Clin Exp Dermatol ; 47(8): 1581-1582, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846197

ABSTRACT

We performed a prospective analysis of Breslow thickness in melanoma before the COVID-19 pandemic and after. It shows that there is a statistically significant increase in melanoma thickness, and ultimately melanoma staging, since the pandemic began.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Melanoma , Skin Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Melanoma/epidemiology , Melanoma/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Skin Neoplasms/epidemiology , Skin Neoplasms/pathology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
14.
Clin Lung Cancer ; 23(6): e362-e376, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819457

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, patients may encounter lung cancer care delays. Here, we sought to examine the impact of extended treatment delay for stage III-IV non-small-cell lung cancer on patient survival. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) and National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) data, Cox regression analysis with penalized smoothing splines was performed to examine the association between treatment delay and all-cause mortality for stage III-IV lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. In the NCDB, propensity score-matched analysis was used to compare cumulative survival in patients who received "early" versus "delayed" treatment (ie, 0-30 vs. 90-120 days following diagnosis). RESULTS: Cox regression analysis of the NLST (n = 392) and NCDB (n = 275,198) cohorts showed a decrease in hazard ratio the longer treatment was delayed. In propensity score-matched analysis, no significant differences in survival were found between early and delayed treatment for patients with stage IIIA, IIIB (T3-4,N2,M0), IIIC, and IV (M1B-C) adenocarcinoma and patients with IIIA, IIIB, IIIC, and IV squamous cell carcinoma (all log-rank P > .05). For patients with stage IIIB (T1-2,N3,M0) and stage IV (M1A) adenocarcinoma, delayed treatment was associated with improved survival (log-rank P = .03, P = .02). The findings were consistent in sensitivity analysis accounting for wait time bias. CONCLUSION: In this national analysis, for patients with stage III-IV adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, an extended treatment delay by 3 to 4 months was not associated with significantly decreased overall survival compared to prompt treatment. These findings can be used to guide decision-making during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell , Lung Neoplasms , Adenocarcinoma/epidemiology , Adenocarcinoma/mortality , Adenocarcinoma/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/therapy , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/mortality , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/therapy , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics
15.
Expert Rev Anticancer Ther ; 22(5): 549-559, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806096

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a variable entity, encompassing bulky primary tumors, nodal involvement, or both. Multidisciplinary evaluation is essential to discuss multiple treatment options, to outline optimal management, and to examine the main debated topics and critical issues not addressed by current trials and guidelines that influence daily clinical practice. AREAS COVERED: From March to 5 May 2021 ,meetings were scheduled in a webinar format titled 'Radio Talk' due to the COVID-19 pandemic; the faculty was composed of 6 radiation oncologists from 6 different Institutions of Italy, all of them were the referring radiation oncologist for lung cancer treatment at their respective departments and were or had been members of AIRO (Italian Association of Radiation Oncology) Thoracic Oncology Study Group. The topics covered included: pulmonary toxicity, cardiac toxicity, radiotherapy dose, fractionation and volumes, unfit/elderly patients, multidisciplinary management. EXPERT OPINION: The debate was focused on the unmet needs triggered by case reports, personal experiences and questions; the answers were often not univocal; however, the exchange of opinion and the contribution of different centers confirmed the role of multidisciplinary management and the necessity that the most critical issues should be investigated in clinical trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Aged , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/radiotherapy , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Radiation Oncologists
16.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 32(5): 613-618, 2022 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794469

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chemoradiation or radiation therapy alone are curative standards for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer. OBJECTIVE: To investigate factors that influence time to initiation of chemoradiation or radiation and the subsequent impact of time to treatment on recurrence and survival outcomes. METHODS: Patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation or radiation at our institution between November 2015 and August 2020 were retrospectively identified. Time to treatment initiation was defined as the number of days from date of diagnosis (via biopsy) to the start date of radiation. The cohort was stratified by the median time to treatment into early (<75 days) and delayed (≥75 days) cohorts. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to examine factors associated with delayed time to treatment. RESULTS: We identified 143 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who underwent definitive chemoradiation or radiation. Median follow-up time was 18 months (range 2-62). A total of 71 (49.7%) patients had time to treatment <75 days and 72 (50.3%) patients had time to treatment ≥75 days. The delayed cohort had a higher proportion of Hispanic patients (51.4% vs 31.0%, p=0.04). In multivariable modeling, Hispanic women were 2.71 times more likely (p=0.04) to undergo delayed time to treatment than non-Hispanic white women. Additionally, patients with stage >IIB disease were less likely to undergo delayed time to treatment (OR 0.26, p=0.02) than patients with stage

Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Adenocarcinoma/pathology , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/pathology , Chemoradiotherapy , Female , Humans , Neoplasm Staging , Retrospective Studies , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/radiotherapy
17.
Cancer Sci ; 113(4): 1531-1534, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779205

ABSTRACT

According to the current international guidelines, high-risk patients diagnosed with pathological T1 (pT1) colorectal cancer (CRC) who underwent complete local resection but may have risk of developing lymph node metastasis (LNM) are recommended additional intestinal resection with lymph node dissection. However, around 90% of the patients without LNM are exposed to the risk of being overtreated due to the insufficient pathological criteria for risk stratification of LNM. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a noninvasive biomarker for molecular residual disease and relapse detection after treatments including surgical and endoscopic resection of solid tumors. The CIRCULATE-Japan project includes a large-scale patient-screening registry of the GALAXY study to track ctDNA status of patients with stage II to IV or recurrent CRC that can be completely resected. Based on the CIRCULATE-Japan platform, we launched DENEB, a new prospective study, within the GALAXY study for patients with pT1 CRC who underwent complete local resection and were scheduled for additional intestinal resection with lymph node dissection based on the standard pathologic risk stratification criteria for LNM. The aim of this study is to explore the ability of predicting LNM using ctDNA analysis compared with the standard pathological criteria. The ctDNA assay will build new evidence to establish a noninvasive personalized diagnosis in patients, which will facilitate tailored/optimal treatment strategies for CRC patients.


Subject(s)
Circulating Tumor DNA , Colorectal Neoplasms , Circulating Tumor DNA/genetics , Colorectal Neoplasms/genetics , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Colorectal Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Liquid Biopsy , Lymph Node Excision , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymphatic Metastasis/pathology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/pathology , Neoplasm Staging , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
18.
Oncology (Williston Park) ; 35(8): 480-484, 2021 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744323

ABSTRACT

Male breast cancer is a rather uncommon and understudied disease. It accounts for less than 1% of all breast cancers, but in recent decades its frequency has been on the rise. Clinical trials of breast cancer have traditionally excluded men. Due to the lack of large-scale prospective studies, most published data come from single-institution, small-cohort studies, and treatment recommendations are based on the extrapolation of data from clinical trials enrolling only women. Although to some extent etiology, diagnosis, and treatment characteristics can be similar, male breast cancer exhibits some distinct features. Men tend to be diagnosed with breast cancer at an older age and at a more advanced stage. A better understanding of the biologic features, clinically relevant differences, effective treatments, and outcomes of male breast cancer is crucial to appropriately manage these patients. We present a male breast cancer case with a germline BRCA2 mutation and discuss the epidemiologic, pathologic, and clinical characteristics along with treatment and follow-up recommendations in view of our recent understanding of this disease.


Subject(s)
BRCA2 Protein/metabolism , Breast Neoplasms, Male/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms, Male/metabolism , Breast Neoplasms, Male/genetics , Breast Neoplasms, Male/pathology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation , Neoplasm Staging
19.
Curr Oncol ; 29(3): 1422-1429, 2022 02 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736842

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to direct most of the available resources towards its management. This has led to the neglect of all other pathologies, including cancer. The aim of this study was to verify whether the difficulty in accessing the health system has led to a reduction in new diagnoses of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and whether this has already been reflected in a more advanced stage of the cancer. A single-center, retrospective study including adult patients with a new diagnosis of HCC was performed. Patients were divided into three groups: the prelockdown phase (May 2019-February 2020), the lockdown phase (March 2020-December 2020), and the postlockdown phase (January 2021-October 2021); 247 patients were included. The number of patients diagnosed with HCC distinctly diminished in the periods March 2020-December 2020 (n = 69; -35%) and January 2021-October 2021 (n = 72; -32%) as compared to the period May 2019-February 2020 (n = 106). Noteworthy was the reduced surveillance in the period January 2021-October 2021 as compared to May 2019-February 2020 (22.9% vs. 36.6%, p = 0.056). No significant changes have yet been observed in tumor characteristics (BCLC staging distribution remained unvaried, p = 0.665). In conclusion, the number of new HCC diagnoses decreased sharply in the first 2 years of the pandemic, with no worsening of the stage. A more advanced stage of the disease could be expected in the next few years in patients who have escaped diagnosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular , Liver Neoplasms , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers
20.
Eur J Cancer ; 161: 38-43, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719652

ABSTRACT

Many countries had to suspend their colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programme as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. This eventually may lead to postponed diagnoses of premalignant lesions and CRC, resulting in increased incidence or more advanced CRCs rates. This study aimed to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on incidence and stage distribution of CRCs in the Netherlands, by monitoring CRC diagnoses and stage distribution in the months before, during and after the first COVID-19 wave. Data on incidence and stage distribution of CRCs of individuals aged 55-75 years in 25 hospitals in the Netherlands were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. The observed incidence after the suspension (March 2020-December 2020) was compared to the expected incidence in the same period. In the period April to June 2020, we observed the largest decrease in the total incidence of CRC. We found that 48% of the decrease was due to stage I, 23% due to stage II, 23% due to stage III and 5% due to stage IV. After gradually resuming screening mid May 2020, we observed an increase in CRC diagnoses from July 2020 onwards. As of October 2020, the observed number of diagnoses was higher than the expected number. As the decrease was mainly limited to stage I CRCs, it seems that the temporary suspension of the CRC screening programme due to the COVID-19 pandemic will have a minimal long-term impact on stage distribution and CRC mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Aged , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Netherlands , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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