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1.
Breast Dis ; 41(1): 1-3, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604128

ABSTRACT

During the first hit of SARS-COVID pandemic, an important reorganization of Healthcare Services has been done, and new protocols and pathways to protect frail patients like oncological patients were designed. The second hit of pandemic had stressed these new pathways and suggests to health-workers some improvements for safer management of patents.We reported our experience in organizing the clinical pathway of neoadjuvant therapy candidate patients based on the execution of sentinel lympho-node biopsy and the placement of implantable venous access port in the same access to operating room before neoadjuvant chemotherapy suggesting a possible organizational model. In the period October-December 2020 we have included in this new type of path twelve patients and we have not registered any cases of COVID among the patients included. We think this new path, adopted amid the second hit, will be useful for all Breast Units that are facing the challenge of guaranteeing the highest standards of care in a historical moment where the health emergency occupies the efforts of health workers and the economic resources of health systems.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Catheterization, Central Venous/methods , Infection Control/methods , Patient Safety , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Breast Neoplasms/surgery , Catheterization, Central Venous/instrumentation , Catheterization, Central Venous/standards , Central Venous Catheters , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Critical Pathways , Female , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Mastectomy , Middle Aged , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Staging , Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy/standards
2.
Clin Nucl Med ; 47(1): e17-e19, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570159

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: We report 3 patients with COVID-19 findings in 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT taken for staging. The first patient, A 64-year-old man with prostate cancer, who had COVID-19 in November 2020 and whose treatment was completed, was observed to continue with COVID-19 findings in 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in December 2020 before surgery. Other patients were asymptomatic for the disease. It was determined that a PSMA uptake in the lungs corresponding to the CT findings of COVID-19 had increased in 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prostatic Neoplasms , Edetic Acid , Gallium Isotopes , Gallium Radioisotopes , Humans , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Clin Nucl Med ; 46(12): 1016-1017, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504452

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: A 70-year-old man with newly diagnosed prostate cancer underwent 18F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT for staging. PSMA-avid primary prostatic malignancy was identified. Incidental intense patchy peripheral lung uptake was also noted. The patient tested positive for COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prostatic Neoplasms , Aged , Edetic Acid , Humans , Lung/pathology , Male , Neoplasm Staging , Niacinamide/analogs & derivatives , Oligopeptides , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 19(7): 1410-1417.e9, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic had a sudden, dramatic impact on healthcare. In Italy, since the beginning of the pandemic, colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programs have been forcefully suspended. We aimed to evaluate whether screening procedure delays can affect the outcomes of CRC screening. METHODS: We built a procedural model considering delays in the time to colonoscopy and estimating the effect on mortality due to up-stage migration of patients. The number of expected CRC cases was computed by using the data of the Italian screened population. Estimates of the effects of delay to colonoscopy on CRC stage, and of stage on mortality were assessed by a meta-analytic approach. RESULTS: With a delay of 0-3 months, 74% of CRC is expected to be stage I-II, while with a delay of 4-6 months there would be a 2%-increase for stage I-II and a concomitant decrease for stage III-IV (P = .068). Compared to baseline (0-3 months), moderate (7-12 months) and long (> 12 months) delays would lead to a significant increase in advanced CRC (from 26% to 29% and 33%, respectively; P = .008 and P < .001, respectively). We estimated a significant increase in the total number of deaths (+12.0%) when moving from a 0-3-months to a >12-month delay (P = .005), and a significant change in mortality distribution by stage when comparing the baseline with the >12-months (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Screening delays beyond 4-6 months would significantly increase advanced CRC cases, and also mortality if lasting beyond 12 months. Our data highlight the need to reorganize efforts against high-impact diseases such as CRC, considering possible future waves of SARS-CoV-2 or other pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Delayed Diagnosis , Early Detection of Cancer , Aged , Colonoscopy , Colorectal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Colorectal Neoplasms/mortality , Humans , Italy , Mass Screening , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics
5.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 155 Suppl 1: 5-6, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482134
6.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(1): 103263, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469812

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: During the COVID-19 pandemic, maintenance of safe and timely oncologic care has been challenging. The goal of this study is to compare presenting symptoms, staging, and treatment of head and neck mucosal squamous cell carcinoma during the pandemic with an analogous timeframe one year prior. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective cohort study at a single tertiary academic center of new adult patients evaluated in a head and neck surgical oncology clinic from March -July 2019 (pre-pandemic control) and March - July 2020 (COVID-19 pandemic). RESULTS: During the pandemic, the proportion of patients with newly diagnosed malignancies increased by 5%, while the overall number of new patients decreased (n = 575) compared to the control year (n = 776). For patients with mucosal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), median time from referral to initial clinic visit decreased from 11 days (2019) to 8 days (2020) (p = 0.0031). There was no significant difference in total number (p = 0.914) or duration (p = 0.872) of symptoms. During the pandemic, patients were more likely to present with regional nodal metastases (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.846, 95% CI 1.072-3.219, p = 0.028) and more advanced clinical nodal (N) staging (p = 0.011). No significant difference was seen for clinical tumor (T) (p = 0.502) or metastasis (M) staging (p = 0.278). No significant difference in pathologic T (p = 0.665), or N staging (p = 0.907) was found between the two periods. CONCLUSION: Head and neck mucosal SCC patients presented with more advanced clinical nodal disease during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic despite no change in presenting symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck/epidemiology , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck/pathology , Aged , Female , Humans , Lymphatic Metastasis , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck/therapy , Tennessee/epidemiology
7.
Obstet Gynecol ; 136(3): 533-542, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455364

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess surgical, oncologic, and pregnancy outcomes in patients undergoing radical vaginal, abdominal, or laparoscopic trachelectomy for the treatment of early-stage cervical cancer, using a methodic review of published literature. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library sources, including ClinicalTrials.gov, were searched from 1990-2019 with terms "cervical cancer" and "(vaginal, abdominal, open, minimally invasive, or laparoscopic) radical trachelectomy." Grey literature and unpublished data were omitted. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: After removal of duplicates from a combined EndNote library of results, 490 articles were reviewed using Covidence software. Two reviewers screened titles and abstracts, and then screened full texts. Selection criteria included articles that reported radical trachelectomy with lymph node assessment as primary therapy for cervical carcinoma, with stated follow-up intervals and recurrences. TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS: Variables of interest were manually extracted into an electronic database. A total 47 articles that reported on 2,566 women met inclusion criteria. Most tumors were of squamous histology (68.5%), stage IB1 (74.8%), 2 cm or less (69.2%), and without lymphovascular invasion (68.8%). Of planned trachelectomies, 9% were converted intraoperatively to hysterectomy. Separated by route of trachelectomy, 58.1%, 37.2%, and 4.7% were performed using radical vaginal, abdominal, and laparoscopic approaches, respectively. With median follow-up of 48 months (range 2-202 months) across studies, median recurrence rate was 3.3% (range 0-25%); median time to recurrence was 26 months (range 8-44 months). Median 5-year recurrence-free and overall survival were 94.6% (range 88-97.3%) and 97.4% (range 95-99%), respectively. The posttrachelectomy pregnancy rate was 23.9%, with a live-birth rate of 75.1%. CONCLUSION: Radical trachelectomy for fertility-preserving treatment of cervical cancer is widely reported in the literature, though publications are mainly limited to case reports and case series. Reported follow-up periods infrequently meet standard oncologic parameters but show encouraging recurrence-free and overall survival rates and pregnancy outcomes. Higher-level evidence needed for meta-analysis is lacking. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO, CRD42019132443.


Subject(s)
Trachelectomy , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/surgery , Female , Humans , Neoplasm Staging , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic/pathology , Pregnancy Complications, Neoplastic/surgery , Pregnancy Rate , Trachelectomy/methods , Treatment Outcome , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/pathology
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(39): e27327, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447670

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: During the COVID-19 pandemic, there are concerns about medical delay, including confirmatory tests after screening for various cancers. We evaluated the lead time to a confirmatory test after an abnormal screening Papanicolaou (Pap) test in women before the COVID-19 period and during the COVID-19 period.The medical records of 1144 women who underwent colposcopy at a single institution located in Seoul after abnormal Pap results from January 2019 to December 2020 were reviewed. The lead time to colposcopy from the Pap test between 2019 and 2020 was compared; the adverse factors for a long lead time to colposcopy were also evaluated.Age, residence, institution, and the Pap results did not differ between women who underwent colposcopy in 2019 (n = 621) and 2020 (n = 523). The time to colposcopy from the Pap test was also not different. A higher number of women were diagnosed with high-grade dysplasia in 2020 and underwent excision procedures; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Instead, patients' residence, institution of the Pap test, and results of the Pap test were associated with a long lead time to colposcopy of >6 weeks.The lead time to colposcopy from the abnormal Pap test was not delayed in the COVID-19 era compared to before. However, regional factors could affect a long lead time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Papanicolaou Test/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Age Factors , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Residence Characteristics , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2126334, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427027

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic has delayed medical consultations, possibly leading to the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer at advanced stages. Objective: To evaluate stage at diagnosis among patients with gastrointestinal cancer in Japan before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study included patients in a hospital-based cancer registry who were diagnosed with gastrointestinal cancer (ie, esophageal, gastric, colorectal, pancreatic, liver, and biliary tract cancers) between January 2016 and December 2020 at 2 tertiary Japanese hospitals. Exposures: The pre-COVID-19 period was defined as January 2017 to February 2020, and the COVID-19 period was defined as March 2020 to December 2020. Main Outcome and Measure: Monthly numbers of patients with newly diagnosed cancer were aggregated, classified by stage, and compared. Results: The study evaluated 5167 patients, including 4218 patients (2825 [67.0%] men; mean [SD] age, 71.3 [10.9] years) in the pre-COVID-19 period and 949 patients (607 [64.0%] men; mean [SD] age, 71.8 [10.7] years) in the COVID-19 period. Comparing the pre-COVID-19 period with the COVID-19 period, significant decreases were observed in the mean (SD) number of patients with newly diagnosed gastric cancer (30.63 [6.62] patients/month vs 22.40 [5.85] patients/month; -26.87% change; P < .001) and colorectal cancer (41.61 [6.81] patients/month vs 36.00 [6.72] patients/month; -13.47% change; P = .03). Significant decreases were also observed in the mean (SD) number of cases of stage I gastric cancer (21.55 [5.66] cases/month vs 13.90 [5.99] cases/month; -35.51% change; P < .001), stage 0 colorectal cancer (10.58 [3.36] cases/month vs 7.10 [4.10] cases/month; -32.89% change; P = .008), and stage I colorectal cancer (10.16 [3.14] cases/month vs 6.70 [2.91] cases/month; -34.04% change; P = .003). No significant increases were observed for esophageal, gastric, pancreatic, liver, or biliary tract cancers. A significant decrease was observed in the mean (SD) number of cases per month of stage II colorectal cancer (7.42 [3.06] cases/month vs 4.80 [1.75] cases/month; -35.32% change; P = .01); a significant increase was observed for the mean (SD) number of cases per month of stage III colorectal cancer (7.18 [2.85] cases/month vs 12.10 [2.42] cases/month; 68.42% change; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of patients in a hospital-based cancer registry form Japan, significantly fewer patients were diagnosed with stage I gastric and colorectal cancers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, the number of screening-detected cancers might have decreased, and colorectal cancer may have been diagnosed at more advanced stages.


Subject(s)
Biliary Tract Neoplasms/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Early Detection of Cancer , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pancreatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Delayed Diagnosis/trends , Female , Humans , Japan , Male , Mass Screening , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Prostate ; 81(16): 1349-1354, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1404607

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The TMPRSS2 protein has been involved in severe acute respiratory syndrome caused by coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The production is regulated by the androgen receptor (AR). It is speculated that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) may protect patients affected by prostate cancer (PC) from SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients treated for COVID-19 in our institution who had a previous diagnosis of PC. We analyzed the influence of exposure of ADT on the presence of severe course of COVID-19. RESULTS: A total of 2280 patients were treated in our center for COVID-19 with a worse course of disease in males (higher rates of hospitalization, intense care unit [ICU] admission, and death). Out of 1349 subjects registered in our PC database, 156 were on ADT and 1193 were not. Out of those, 61 (4.52%) PC patients suffered from COVID-19, 11 (18.0%) belonged to the ADT group, and 50 (82.0%) to the non-ADT group. Regarding the influence of ADT on the course of the disease, statistically significant differences were found neither in the death rate (27.3% vs. 34%; p = 0.481), nor in the presence of severe COVID-19: need for intubation or ICU admission (0% vs. 6.3%; p = 0.561) and need for corticoid treatment, interferon beta, or tocilizumab (60% vs. 34.7%; p = 0.128). Multivariate analysis adjusted for clinically relevant comorbidities did not find that ADT was a protective factor for worse clinical evolution (risk ratio [RR] 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64-1.83; p = 0.77) or death (RR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.26-1.74; p = 0.41). CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms that COVID-19 is more severe in men. However, the use of ADT in patients with PC was not shown to prevent the risk of severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Androgen Antagonists/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Prostatic Neoplasms/drug therapy , Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
11.
Anticancer Res ; 41(9): 4439-4442, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395531

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy are common treatments for rectal and anal cancer. Anticipation of treatment may cause distress and sleep disorders. This study aimed to identify risk factors for sleep disorders. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 42 patients with rectal or anal cancer scheduled for radiotherapy, 16 characteristics were analyzed for associations with pre-radiotherapy sleep disorders including age, gender, performance score, comorbidity, patient's or family history of additional cancer/melanoma, distress score, emotional/physical/practical problems, tumor site and stage, surgery and relation to COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Overall prevalence of pre-radiotherapy sleep disorders was 42.9%. Sleep disorders were significantly associated with Karnofsky performance score 60-80 (p=0.044), Charlson comorbidity index ≥3 (p=0.0012), distress score 6-10 (p=0.00012), and more emotional (p=0.0012), physical (p=0.0004) or practical (p=0.033) problems. A trend was found for female gender (p=0.061). CONCLUSION: Sleep disorders were common in patients with rectal or anal cancer scheduled for radiotherapy. Risk factors can help identify patients requiring psychooncological support already prior to the start of radiotherapy.


Subject(s)
Anus Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Anus Neoplasms/surgery , Rectal Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Rectal Neoplasms/surgery , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Aged , Anus Neoplasms/pathology , Anus Neoplasms/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dose Fractionation, Radiation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Prevalence , Rectal Neoplasms/pathology , Rectal Neoplasms/psychology , Sex Characteristics , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Treatment Outcome
12.
Anticancer Res ; 41(9): 4407-4410, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395530

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: Many patients with gynecological malignancies receive postoperative radiotherapy, which can lead to fear and sleep disorders. We aimed to identify the prevalence of and risk factors for sleep disorders. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-two patients assigned to radiotherapy for gynecological malignancies were retrospectively evaluated. Seventeen characteristics were analyzed for associations with pre-radiotherapy sleep disorders including age, Karnofsky performance score, Charlson comorbidity index, history of additional malignancy, family history of gynecological cancer, distress score, emotional, physical or practical problems, tumor site/stage; chemotherapy, treatment volume, brachytherapy, and the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: The prevalence of pre-radiotherapy sleep disorders was 46.8%. Sleep disorders were significantly associated with Charlson comorbidity index ≥3 (p=0.012), greater number of physical problems (p<0.0001), and advanced primary tumor stage (p=0.005). A trend was found for greater number of emotional problems (p=0.075). CONCLUSION: Pre-radiotherapy sleep disorders are common in patients with gynecological malignancies, particularly in those with specific risk factors. Patients should be offered early psychological support.


Subject(s)
Genital Neoplasms, Female/radiotherapy , Genital Neoplasms, Female/surgery , Radiotherapy, Adjuvant/methods , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Brachytherapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/pathology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/psychology , Humans , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Treatment Outcome
13.
J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia ; 26(3): 221-226, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1375665

ABSTRACT

The twelfth annual workshop of the European Network for Breast Development and Cancer focused on methods in mammary gland biology and breast cancer, was scheduled to take place on March 26-28, 2020, in Weggis, Switzerland. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the meeting was rescheduled twice and eventually happened as a virtual meeting on April 22 and 23, 2021. The main topics of the meeting were branching and development of the mammary gland, tumor microenvironment, circulating tumor cells, tumor dormancy and breast cancer metastasis. Novel and unpublished findings related to these topics were presented, with a particular focus on the methods used to obtain them. Virtual poster sessions were a success, with many constructive and fruitful interactions between researchers and covered many areas of mammary gland biology and breast cancer.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/methods , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Mammary Glands, Human/pathology , Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/metabolism , Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Combined Modality Therapy , Europe , Female , Humans , Mammary Glands, Human/growth & development , Mammary Glands, Human/metabolism , Neoplasm Metastasis , Neoplasm Staging , Neoplastic Cells, Circulating , Prognosis , Tumor Microenvironment
14.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256544, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374151

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represent a vulnerable population potentially negatively affected by COVID-19-associated reallocation of healthcare resources. Here, we report the impact of COVID-19 on the management of HCC patients in a large tertiary care hospital. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed clinical data of HCC patients who presented at the Vienna General Hospital, between 01/DEC/2019 and 30/JUN/2020. We compared patient care before (period 1) and after (period 2) implementation of COVID-19-associated healthcare restrictions on 16/MAR/2020. RESULTS: Of 126 patients, majority was male (n = 104, 83%) with a mean age of 66±11 years. Half of patients (n = 57, 45%) had impaired liver function (Child-Pugh stage B/C) and 91 (72%) had intermediate-advanced stage HCC (BCLC B-D). New treatment, was initiated in 68 (54%) patients. Number of new HCC diagnoses did not differ between the two periods (n = 14 vs. 14). While personal visits were reduced, an increase in teleconsultation was observed (period 2). Number of patients with visit delays (n = 31 (30%) vs. n = 10 (10%); p = 0.001) and imaging delays (n = 25 (25%) vs. n = 7 (7%); p = 0.001) was higher in period 2. Accordingly, a reduced number of patients was discussed in interdisciplinary tumor boards (lowest number in April (n = 24), compared to a median number of 57 patients during period 1). Median number of elective/non-elective admissions was not different between the periods. One patient contracted COVID-19 with lethal outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in patient care included reduced personal contacts but increased telephone visits, and delays in diagnostic procedures. The effects on long-term outcome need to be determined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/virology , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/mortality , Carcinoma, Hepatocellular/pathology , Delayed Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/drug therapy , Liver Neoplasms/mortality , Liver Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Pandemics , Patients/psychology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Survival Rate , Telemedicine , Tertiary Care Centers
15.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 42(6): 103162, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321975

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Restriction in healthcare services during the COVID-19 pandemic caused delays in the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases. To overcome the risk of missed diagnosis of head and neck cancers, before deleting the scheduled appointments, we have introduced a selection of the patients by examining the clinical presenting issue and previous medical history. The aim of this study is to show the effects of the abovementioned strategy on the diagnosis and management of laryngeal cancer. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Hospital software regarding the new diagnosis of laryngeal SCC in the periods from March 2020 to December 2020 during the pandemic (study group) and from March 2019 to December 2019 (control group) were collected. Data were compared regarding: TNM stage, time from first medical examination to histological diagnosis (Time-1), and time form histological diagnosis to beginning of treatments (Time-2). RESULTS: The final study group was composed by 19 laryngeal cancers, the control group by 25 cases. No significant differences were found in the tumour stage between the groups. In the study group, Time-1 was shorter (24 days versus 43 days, p = 0.012), while Time-2 in surgically-treated patients was longer (20 days versus 9 days, p = 0.012). CONCLUSION: During the pandemic, there was a dramatic lack of medical and nurse staff needed for surgical procedures. As consequence, the time between the diagnosis of malignancy and surgical treatment increased. In our unit, an efficient patient selection strategy to reschedule medical appointments avoided a dangerous shift toward higher laryngeal cancer stages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delayed Diagnosis/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Laryngeal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Laryngeal Neoplasms/prevention & control , Aged , Appointments and Schedules , Female , Humans , Laryngeal Neoplasms/pathology , Laryngeal Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Time Factors
16.
Curr Oncol ; 28(3): 1618-1629, 2021 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314595

ABSTRACT

Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) comprises a highly heterogenous group of patients with regards to patient fitness and tumour size and distribution, resulting in a wide range of treatment goals and therapy options. Curative-intent multimodality treatment should be considered in all patients with stage III NSCLC. For patients with unresectable disease who are fit, have adequate lung function, and have a disease that can be encompassed within a radical radiation volume, concurrent chemoradiation therapy (cCRT) is the standard of care and can produce cure rates of 20-30%. Recently, consolidation immunotherapy with durvalumab has been recognized as the standard of care following cCRT based on significant improvement rates in overall survival at 4 years. The large heterogeneity of the stage III NSCLC population, along with the need for extensive staging procedures, multidisciplinary care, intensive cCRT, and now consolidation therapy makes the delivery of timely and optimal treatment for these patients complex. Several logistical, communication, and education factors hinder the delivery of guideline-recommended care to patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC. This commentary discusses the potential challenges patients may encounter at different points along their care pathway that can interfere with delivery of curative-intent therapy and suggests strategies for improving care delivery.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung , Lung Neoplasms , Canada , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Chemoradiotherapy , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasm Staging
17.
Gynecol Oncol ; 161(2): 414-421, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1151485

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The current coronavirus pandemic caused a significant decrease in cancer-related encounters resulting in a delay in treatment of cancer patients. The objective of this study was to examine the survival effect of delay in starting concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) in women with locally-advanced cervical cancer. METHODS: This is a retrospective observational study querying the National Cancer Database from 2004 to 2016. Women with stage IB2-IVA squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, or adenosquamous carcinoma of the uterine cervix who received definitive CCRT with known wait-time for CCRT initiation after cancer diagnosis were eligible (N=13,617). Cox proportional hazard regression model with restricted cubic spline transformation was fitted to assess the association between CCRT wait-time and all-cause mortality in multivariable analysis. RESULTS: The median wait-time to start CCRT was 6 (IQR 4-8) weeks. In a multivariable analysis, older age, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic ethnicity, recent year of diagnosis, Medicaid and uninsured status, medical comorbidities, and absence of nodal metastasis were associated with longer CCRT wait-time (P<.05). Women with aggressive tumor factors (poorer differentiation, large tumor size, nodal metastasis, and higher cancer stage) were more likely to have a short CCRT wait-time (P<.05). After controlling for the measured covariates, CCRT wait-time of 6.1-9.8 weeks was not associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality compared to a wait-time of 6 weeks. Similar association was observed when the cohort was stratified by histology, cancer stage, tumor size, or brachytherapy use. CONCLUSION: An implication of this study for the current coronavirus pandemic is that in the absence of aggressive tumor factors, a short period of wait-time to start definitive CCRT may not be associated with increased risk of mortality in women with locally-advanced cervical cancer.


Subject(s)
Adenocarcinoma/therapy , COVID-19 , Carcinoma, Adenosquamous/therapy , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/therapy , Adenocarcinoma/secondary , Adult , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Carcinoma, Adenosquamous/secondary , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/secondary , Chemoradiotherapy , Female , Humans , Lymphatic Metastasis , Medicaid/statistics & numerical data , Medically Uninsured/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Grading , Neoplasm Staging , Proportional Hazards Models , Race Factors , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate , Tumor Burden , United States , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/pathology
18.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 28(13): 8651-8662, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268205

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: National medical/surgical organizations have recommended the use of neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (NET) to bridge surgery delay of weeks to months for patients with hormone receptor positive (HR+) breast cancer during the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The effects of NET of varying durations on pathologic response are unclear. Using the National Cancer Database (NCDB), we evaluated objective response to short (< 9 weeks), moderate (9-27 weeks), and long (> 27 weeks) duration of NET. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study cohort included female patients diagnosed with nonmetastatic invasive HR+ breast cancer, stratifying by those who received NET versus no NET between 2004 and 2016. Pathologic response was grouped into four categories (complete, downstaged, stable, upstaged) by comparing clinical and pathologic staging data. Objective response to NET included complete, downstaged, and stable pathologic response. Clinical characteristics were compared using χ2 and analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with NET use and objective response according to NET duration. RESULTS: A minority (1.2%) received NET in our cohort. Factors associated with NET use included older age, non-Black patients, more advanced clinical stage, higher comorbidity score, government insurance, and lobular histology. Objective response rate (ORR) was 56.7%, 52.1%, and 49.0% after short, moderate, and long NET duration, respectively. CONCLUSION: Short NET duration did not result in an inferior ORR. Future study to evaluate the interaction between surgery delay and NET use on clinical outcome will provide insights into the safety of NET to bridge potential surgery delay in patients with HR+ breast cancer.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Breast Neoplasms/pathology , Chemotherapy, Adjuvant , Female , Humans , Neoadjuvant Therapy , Neoplasm Staging , Receptor, ErbB-2 , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(10): 3868-3878, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264763

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the mortality rate between advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients (NSCLC) with and without COVID-19. This study also explores the possible laboratory characteristics used for prognostication in patients with NSCLC and COVID-19. Additionally, this study evaluated potential differences in laboratory values between the case and control groups. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a single-center retrospective cohort study conducted in Dharmais National Cancer Hospital, Indonesia, enrolling patients with NSCLC undergoing chemotherapy or targeted therapy between May 2020 and January 2021. All patients with NSCLC and COVID-19 in these periods were enrolled into the case group. The control group was age-matched NSCLC patients without COVID-19 that was derived from the NSCLC cohort through randomization. RESULTS: There were 342 patients with NSCLC between May 2020 and January 2021. Twenty-seven (7.9%) of the patients were infected by COVID-19. To facilitate comparison, thirty-five age-matched controls with NSCLC were selected from the cohort. The mortality rate in patients with COVID-19 was 46.2%. Eleven patients (40.7%) had severe COVID-19, of which none survived. NLR >8.35 has a sensitivity of 83.3%, specificity of 92.9%, LR+ of 12, and LR- of 0.18. The AUC was 0.946 (95% CI 0.867-1.000), p<0.001. PLR >29.14 has a sensitivity of 75.0%, specificity of 71.4%, LR+ 2.62, LR- 0.35, and AUC 0.851 (95% CI 0.706-0.996), p=0.002. Both NLR and PLR were associated with shorter time-to-mortality in the unadjusted and adjusted model CONCLUSIONS: NLR and PLR are independent predictors of mortality in COVID-19 patients with NSCLC.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/cytology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/mortality , Lung Neoplasms/mortality , Lymphocytes/cytology , Neutrophils/cytology , Aged , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/virology , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/complications , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/pathology , Female , Humans , Indonesia , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sensitivity and Specificity , Survival Rate
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