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1.
Vaccine ; 40(46): 6649-6657, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106118

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Vaccine hesitancy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic is a major public health concern in the US. Cancer patients are especially vulnerable to adverse COVID-19 outcomes and require targeted prevention efforts against COVID-19. METHODS: We used longitudinal survey data from patients seen at Moffitt Cancer Center to identify attitudes, beliefs, and sociodemographic factors associated with COVID-19 vaccination acceptance among cancer patients. Patients with confirmed invasive cancer diagnosis through Cancer Registry data were asked about vaccine acceptance through the question "Now that a COVID-19 vaccine is available, are you likely to get it?" and dichotomized into high accepters (already received it, would get it when available) and low accepters (waiting for a doctor to recommend it, waiting until more people received it, not likely to get it). RESULTS: Most patients (86.8% of 5,814) were high accepters of the COVID-19 vaccine. High accepters had more confidence in the effectiveness and safety of the vaccine than low accepters. Multivariable logistic regression showed older individuals (70-89 vs.18-49: OR:2.57, 95% CI:1.33-4.86), those with greater perceived severity of COVID-19 infection (very serious vs. not at all serious: OR:2.55, 95% CI:1.76-3.70), practicing more risk mitigation behaviors (per one standard deviation OR:1.75, 95% CI:1.57-1.95), and history of receiving the flu shot versus not (OR:6.56, 95% CI:5.25-8.20) had higher odds of vaccine acceptance. Individuals living with more than one other person (vs. alone: OR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.35, 0.79) and those who were more socioeconomically disadvantaged (per 10 percentile points: OR: 0.89, 95 %CI: 0.85, 0.93) had lower odds of reporting vaccine acceptance. CONCLUSION: Most patients with cancer have or would receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Those who are less likely to accept the vaccine have more concerns regarding effectiveness and side effects, are younger, more socioeconomically disadvantaged, and have lower perceptions of COVID-19 severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Vaccination
2.
In Vivo ; 36(6): 2780-2789, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100679

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: To prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of the BNT162b2 vaccine in solid cancer patients undergoing systemic chemotherapy (n=63). PATIENTS AND METHODS: COVID-19 anti-spike protein antibody levels were measured before the first BNT162b2 vaccination, just before the second BNT162b2 vaccination, one month after the second BNT162b2 vaccination, and 3 months after the second BNT162b2 vaccination. Anti-spike protein antibody seropositivity was set at ≥0.8 U/ml. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer was the most commonly observed primary disease (36.5%). ECOG-PS 0 was observed in the majority (52.4%) of patients. The overall response rate and the median (range) anti-spike protein antibody levels in the whole cohort at 3 months after the second BNT162b2 vaccination were 98.4% (62/63) and 206 (0.4-3,813) U/ml. None of the patients required postponement or discontinuation of systemic chemotherapy because of an adverse reaction. CONCLUSION: The BNT162b vaccine in solid cancer patients undergoing systemic chemotherapy is effective and safe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Vaccines , Humans , Prospective Studies , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Vaccines/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral
3.
Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi ; 44(10): 1083-1090, 2022 Oct 23.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099944

ABSTRACT

The new coronavirus is still in the global pandemic stage. At present, the Delta strain and the Omicron strain are the main circulating strains. The mutant strain has stronger infectivity than the original virus. In the content of COVID-19 pandemic, social public resources and medical resources may be affected, which lead to the medical treatment being delayed or interrupted in some patients with malignant tumors. Based on relevant research and clinical practice at home and abroad, the Cancer Support Therapy Committee of China Anti-Cancer Association and the Cancer Clinical Chemotherapy Committee of China Anti-Cancer Association, in the light of China's national conditions and the availability of resources such as vaccines and antiviral drug, to formulate a consensus of Chinese experts on issues related to the prevention, treatment and management of patients with solid tumors. The main contents include the vaccination of cancer patients with COVID-19, the optimization of medical resources, and the timing of restarting anti-tumor therapy after COVID-19 infection. This article is aimed at providing reference for clinical practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Pandemics , Consensus , China
4.
Curr Oncol ; 29(11): 8431-8441, 2022 Nov 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099385

ABSTRACT

This qualitative study begins to explore cancer survivors' evolving perceptions of "Focus on the Future," a 6-week supportive virtual program led by trained volunteers and health care professionals. Through purposive sampling, participants (n = 10) enrolled in the program were individually interviewed shortly before attending, mid-way through, and at program completion. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to develop key elements of program expectations and users' perceptions over time. Three themes transpired from the data: (1) Trustworthiness and timeliness of survivorship information and expert guidance, (2) Normalization of survivors' experiences, and (3) Virtual program delivery issues. Some participants' perceptions remained unchanged from pre-program expectations to post-program completion such as appreciating the efficiency of virtual delivery and "health safe" exchanges given the COVID-19 pandemic. In contrast, other perceptions became more polarized including drawbacks related to "more superficial" virtual connections and uneven topic relevance as the program evolved. Program participants appreciated timely information and support from volunteers and experts through virtual means and consecutive weekly sessions. Gauging participants' perceptions across time also offer opportunities to adjust program content and delivery features. Future research should explore key program development strategies to ensure that cancer supportive programs are optimally person-centered, co-designed, and situation-responsive.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Humans , Pandemics , Survivors , Qualitative Research , Neoplasms/therapy
5.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev ; 23(10): 3265-3271, 2022 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100938

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aims to measure the occupational fatigue level and describe the sources and consequences of occupational fatigue among middle and higher management at an international specialized cancer center during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A mixed-method design was used in this study. A convenience sampling technique was utilized to select the participants from King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, Jordan. The data was collected through a self-administered questionnaire. This questionnaire included both quantitative and qualitative sections. We utilized Fatigue Risk Assessment and Management in High-Risk Environments (FRAME)-26 items scale for the quantitative section. Two main questions were included in the survey to identify the sources and consequences of occupational fatigue. RESULTS: The results show that the average mean of occupational fatigue was 2.95/5 (SD=0.70). The level of changes in fatigue levels after the COVID-19 pandemic increased by 0.87/3 (SD=1.45). The sources of occupational fatigue could be categorized into five themes: workload, work environment, staffing, psychological, and physical sources. There are four themes categorizing occupational fatigue: social, economic, health, and daily activity and lifestyle. CONCLUSION: This study affords valuable insight into the level, source, and consequences of occupational fatigue among middle and higher management at an international specialized cancer hospital in developing countries. The results indicate that the occupational fatigue level was moderate, and the fatigue level was negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Workplace , Workload/psychology , Neoplasms/epidemiology
6.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev ; 23(6): 2049-2055, 2022 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100937

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine has been administered to children and adolescents with cancer and hematologic diseases since they are at high risk of manifesting severe symptoms if they have COVID-19 infection but the adequate immune response after vaccination in these immunocompromised patients are questionable. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the immune response of children and adolescents with cancer and hematologic diseases after receiving 2 doses of the BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 vaccine. METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study of patients with cancer and hematologic disease, who aged 12- 18 years old and received 2 doses the BNT162b2 vaccines at 4 weeks apart were enrolled. Immunogenicity was determined by measuring serum anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin antibodies directed against the receptor binding domain (RBD) of S1 domain of the spike protein (Anti S-RBD), surrogated viral neutralization test (sVNT) of SARS-CoV-2 and Delta strain. Blood samples were collected and analyzed at 4 and 12 weeks after vaccination. The seroprotective rate was defined as sVNT ≥ 68%. RESULTS: From Oct 2021 to Jan 2022, 43 children were enrolled, 21 were on-therapy and 22 were off-therapy. 25 were hematologic malignancy, 15 solid tumor and 3 hematologic diseases with immunosuppressive drugs. The GMT (95%CI) of a anti S-RBD IgG level at 4 weeks after vaccination were 56.05 (13.2,238.2) and 3633 (2689,4908) BAU/mL in on-therapy and off-therapy group, respectively, p<0.001. The sVNT (95%CI) of delta strain were 26% (5.85-73.55%) and 97.05% (96.0-97.4%) as the seroprotective level which were 33.3% in on-therapy group and 100% in off-therapy group (p<0.001). 14 children in on-therapy group need an additional dose. CONCLUSION: After complete vaccination, the seroprotective rate and antibody level in pediatric and adolescent patients with cancer and hematologic disease who receive immunosuppressive agents are quite low, compared with patients who had complete treatment. Additional dose of primary series should be offered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematologic Diseases , Neoplasms , Viral Vaccines , Adolescent , Antibodies, Viral , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Child , Humans , Immunity , Neoplasms/therapy , Prospective Studies , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Viral Vaccines/genetics
7.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 299: 118-125, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099073

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine can provide a solution for disease management during the COVID-19 pandemic. This literature review aims to explore the role of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic for management of cancer patients. METHOD: A comprehensive systematic search was conducted in PubMed, Science Direct, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases for the papers published until April 2021. Studies were included in case they had practically used telemedicine in the management of cancer patients during the COVID-19 crisis. RESULTS: After screening 2614 titles and abstracts and reviewing 305 full-texts, 16 studies were found to be eligible. The results indicated that most of the patients contacted by telemedicine services mostly used to intract with patients breast cancer (n=4, 25%). The most common use of telemedicine was the provision of virtual visit services (n=10, 62.25%). Besides, communication was most frequently provided by live video conferences (n=11, 68.75%). CONCLUSION: Telemedicine can provide continued access to necessary health services in oncology care and serve as an important role in pandemic planning and response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Medical Oncology/methods
9.
Acta Biomed ; 93(5): e2022224, 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2091389
10.
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol ; 44(8): 462-464, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087907

ABSTRACT

Socialization with peers is essential for development yet reduced when children and adolescents are undergoing cancer treatment. Providing opportunity for social experiences is a key role for providers working in the pediatric oncology setting. Traditional in-person socialization activities were significantly impacted by coronavirus disease-2019 restrictions, and psychosocial providers were forced to adapt their practice. This case series illustrates four unique scenarios that highlight virtual social interactions as both feasible and beneficial. While virtual socialization groups were intended to be temporary, the experiences described suggest that ongoing video-based options for some socialization activities are likely prudent for some pediatric populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Child , Adolescent , Humans , Socialization , Pandemics , Peer Group , Neoplasms/psychology
11.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085154
12.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085153
13.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085152
14.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085151
15.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085150
16.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085149
17.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085148
18.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085147
19.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085146
20.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69 Suppl 5: e29952, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085145
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