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1.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev ; 23(10): 3265-3271, 2022 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100938

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aims to measure the occupational fatigue level and describe the sources and consequences of occupational fatigue among middle and higher management at an international specialized cancer center during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A mixed-method design was used in this study. A convenience sampling technique was utilized to select the participants from King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman, Jordan. The data was collected through a self-administered questionnaire. This questionnaire included both quantitative and qualitative sections. We utilized Fatigue Risk Assessment and Management in High-Risk Environments (FRAME)-26 items scale for the quantitative section. Two main questions were included in the survey to identify the sources and consequences of occupational fatigue. RESULTS: The results show that the average mean of occupational fatigue was 2.95/5 (SD=0.70). The level of changes in fatigue levels after the COVID-19 pandemic increased by 0.87/3 (SD=1.45). The sources of occupational fatigue could be categorized into five themes: workload, work environment, staffing, psychological, and physical sources. There are four themes categorizing occupational fatigue: social, economic, health, and daily activity and lifestyle. CONCLUSION: This study affords valuable insight into the level, source, and consequences of occupational fatigue among middle and higher management at an international specialized cancer hospital in developing countries. The results indicate that the occupational fatigue level was moderate, and the fatigue level was negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Workplace , Workload/psychology , Neoplasms/epidemiology
4.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0272740, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079725

ABSTRACT

Uninsured or underinsured individuals with cancer are likely to experience financial hardship, including forgoing healthcare or non-healthcare needs such as food, housing, or utilities. This study evaluates the association between health insurance coverage and financial hardship among cancer survivors during the COVID-19 pandemic. This cross-sectional analysis used Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF) survey data from May to July 2020. Cancer survivors who previously received case management or financial aid from PAF self-reported challenges paying for healthcare and non-healthcare needs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Associations between insurance coverage and payment challenges were estimated using Poisson regression with robust standard errors, which allowed for estimation of adjusted relative risks (aRR). Of 1,437 respondents, 74% had annual household incomes <$48,000. Most respondents were enrolled in Medicare (48%), 22% in employer-sponsored insurance, 13% in Medicaid, 6% in an Affordable Care Act (ACA) plan, and 3% were uninsured. Approximately 31% of respondents reported trouble paying for healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. Respondents who were uninsured (aRR 2.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.83-3.64), enrolled in an ACA plan (aRR 1.86, 95% CI 1.28-2.72), employer-sponsored insurance (aRR 1.70, 95% CI 1.23-2.34), or Medicare (aRR 1.49, 95% CI 1.09-2.03) had higher risk of trouble paying for healthcare compared to Medicaid enrollees. Challenges paying for non-healthcare needs were reported by 57% of respondents, with 40% reporting trouble paying for food, 31% housing, 28% transportation, and 20% internet. In adjusted models, Medicare and employer-sponsored insurance enrollees were less likely to have difficulties paying for non-healthcare needs compared to Medicaid beneficiaries. Despite 97% of our cancer survivor sample being insured, 31% and 57% reported trouble paying for healthcare and non-healthcare needs during the COVID-19 pandemic, respectively. Greater attention to both medical and non-medical financial burden is needed given the economic pressures of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Financial Stress/epidemiology , Humans , Insurance Coverage , Insurance, Health , Medically Uninsured , Medicare , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act , United States/epidemiology
5.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 8: e2200149, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079582

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Delivering high-quality cancer care to patients through a multidisciplinary team (MDT) care approach remains a challenge, particularly in low- and middle-income countries characterized by fragmented health systems and limited human resources for cancer care. City Cancer Challenge (C/Can) is supporting cities in low- and middle-income countries as they work to improve access to equitable quality cancer care. C/Can has developed an innovative methodology to address the MDT gap, piloted in four cities-Asunciòn, Cali, Kumasi, and Yangon. METHODS: Collaborating with a network of partners, C/Can and ASCO have developed a package of technical cooperation support focusing on two priority areas that have emerged as core needs: first developing consensus-based, city-wide patient management guidelines for the most common cancers and second, building capacity for the implementation of MDTs in institutions providing cancer care in the city. RESULTS: The real-time application of C/Can's MDT approach in Cali and Asuncion underlined the importance of engaging the right stakeholders early on and embedding MDT guidelines in local and national regulatory frameworks to achieve their sustainable uptake. The results in Cali and Asuncion were essential for informing the process in Yangon, asserting the clear benefits of city-to-city knowledge exchange. Finally, the global COVID-19 pandemic prompted a rapid adaptation of the methodology from an in-person to virtual format; the unexpected success of the virtual program in Kumasi has led to its application in subsequent C/Can cities. CONCLUSION: The application of C/Can's methodology in this first set of cities has reinforced not only the importance of both resource appropriate guidelines and a highly trained health workforce but also the need for commitment to work across institutions and disciplines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cities , Developing Countries , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Care Team
6.
BMJ Glob Health ; 7(10)2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078912

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Childhood cancer is a leading cause of death. It is unclear whether the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we aimed to establish all-cause mortality rates for childhood cancers during the COVID-19 pandemic and determine the factors associated with mortality. METHODS: Prospective cohort study in 109 institutions in 41 countries. INCLUSION CRITERIA: children <18 years who were newly diagnosed with or undergoing active treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, retinoblastoma, Wilms tumour, glioma, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma and neuroblastoma. Of 2327 cases, 2118 patients were included in the study. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality at 30 days, 90 days and 12 months. RESULTS: All-cause mortality was 3.4% (n=71/2084) at 30-day follow-up, 5.7% (n=113/1969) at 90-day follow-up and 13.0% (n=206/1581) at 12-month follow-up. The median time from diagnosis to multidisciplinary team (MDT) plan was longest in low-income countries (7 days, IQR 3-11). Multivariable analysis revealed several factors associated with 12-month mortality, including low-income (OR 6.99 (95% CI 2.49 to 19.68); p<0.001), lower middle income (OR 3.32 (95% CI 1.96 to 5.61); p<0.001) and upper middle income (OR 3.49 (95% CI 2.02 to 6.03); p<0.001) country status and chemotherapy (OR 0.55 (95% CI 0.36 to 0.86); p=0.008) and immunotherapy (OR 0.27 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.91); p=0.035) within 30 days from MDT plan. Multivariable analysis revealed laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection (OR 5.33 (95% CI 1.19 to 23.84); p=0.029) was associated with 30-day mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Children with cancer are more likely to die within 30 days if infected with SARS-CoV-2. However, timely treatment reduced odds of death. This report provides crucial information to balance the benefits of providing anticancer therapy against the risks of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children with cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Child , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplasms/epidemiology
7.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 17313, 2022 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077092

ABSTRACT

We investigated the association between a wide range of comorbidities and COVID-19 in-hospital mortality and assessed the influence of multi morbidity on the risk of COVID-19-related death using a large, regional cohort of 6036 hospitalized patients. This retrospective cohort study was conducted using Patient Administration System Admissions and Discharges data. The International Classification of Diseases 10th edition (ICD-10) diagnosis codes were used to identify common comorbidities and the outcome measure. Individuals with lymphoma (odds ratio [OR], 2.78;95% CI,1.64-4.74), metastatic cancer (OR, 2.17; 95% CI,1.25-3.77), solid tumour without metastasis (OR, 1.67; 95% CI,1.16-2.41), liver disease (OR: 2.50, 95% CI,1.53-4.07), congestive heart failure (OR, 1.69; 95% CI,1.32-2.15), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR, 1.43; 95% CI,1.18-1.72), obesity (OR, 5.28; 95% CI,2.92-9.52), renal disease (OR, 1.81; 95% CI,1.51-2.19), and dementia (OR, 1.44; 95% CI,1.17-1.76) were at increased risk of COVID-19 mortality. Asthma was associated with a lower risk of death compared to non-asthma controls (OR, 0.60; 95% CI,0.42-0.86). Individuals with two (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.47-2.20; P < 0.001), and three or more comorbidities (OR, 1.80; 95% CI, 1.43-2.27; P < 0.001) were at increasingly higher risk of death when compared to those with no underlying conditions. Furthermore, multi morbidity patterns were analysed by identifying clusters of conditions in hospitalised COVID-19 patients using k-mode clustering, an unsupervised machine learning technique. Six patient clusters were identified, with recognisable co-occurrences of COVID-19 with different combinations of diseases, namely, cardiovascular (100%) and renal (15.6%) diseases in patient Cluster 1; mental and neurological disorders (100%) with metabolic and endocrine diseases (19.3%) in patient Cluster 2; respiratory (100%) and cardiovascular (15.0%) diseases in patient Cluster 3, cancer (5.9%) with genitourinary (9.0%) as well as metabolic and endocrine diseases (9.6%) in patient Cluster 4; metabolic and endocrine diseases (100%) and cardiovascular diseases (69.1%) in patient Cluster 5; mental and neurological disorders (100%) with cardiovascular diseases (100%) in patient Cluster 6. The highest mortality of 29.4% was reported in Cluster 6.


Subject(s)
Asthma , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Neoplasms , Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Multimorbidity , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Preexisting Condition Coverage , Retrospective Studies
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065979

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, there were first reports of an atypical pneumonia detected in Wuhan city, China [...].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065977

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed tremendous challenges to healthcare systems. Care for oncology patients, a vulnerable population during the pandemic, was disrupted and drastically changed. A multicenter qualitative study was conducted in 11 Belgian hospitals with the aim to provide an overview of the most important changes that were made in the care of oncology patients in Belgium. In each hospital, a nurse or physician was interviewed by telephone. Two rounds of structured interviews-during the first and second waves of the pandemic-were conducted. The data were analyzed using content analysis. The impact of COVID-19 on care practices for patients with cancer was enormous during the first wave. Major changes, including good but also less patient-centered practices, were implemented with unprecedented speed. After the initial wave, regular care was resumed and only limited new care practices were maintained. In only a few hospitals, healthcare teams reflected on lessons learned and on the maintenance of good practices that came from the COVID-19 experience. As a result, opportunities for healthcare innovation and quality improvement seemed to be missed. Our recommendations aim to support policymakers, hospital managers, and healthcare professionals to learn from the COVID-19 pandemic and to drive patient-centered initiatives in future cancer care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Belgium/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics
12.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev ; 23(9): 2879-2880, 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2057001

ABSTRACT

Pakistan has an approximate population of 228.9 million. In 2020, 178,388 new cancer cases were diagnosed in Pakistan. In 2019, we established the biobanking facility at Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, Pakistan. Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre is a tertiary care charitable, not-for-profit cancer hospital in Pakistan. In 2020-21, 22,745 new cancer patients were registered in the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre for cancer treatment. The hospital treats around 75% of accepted cancer patients free of charge, regardless of race or nationality. In December 2019, a novel coronavirus SARS-Cov-2 (COVID-19) was identified in China. The World Health Organization acknowledged the COVID-19 outbreak as a pandemic. Pakistan was hit by the first wave of COVID-19 in March 2020. We have highlighted the challenges faced during the COVID-19 pandemic. We emphasized the significance of collaborations between low and middle-income countries' biobanks and international biobanks to achieve the global perspective of biobanking.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Biological Specimen Banks , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pakistan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
BMC Med Res Methodol ; 22(1): 260, 2022 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053864

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Missing data may lead to loss of statistical power and introduce bias in clinical trials. The Covid-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on patient health care and on the conduct of cancer clinical trials. Although several endpoints may be affected, progression-free survival (PFS) is of major concern, given its frequent use as primary endpoint in advanced cancer and the fact that missed radiographic assessments are to be expected. The recent introduction of the estimand framework creates an opportunity to define more precisely the target of estimation and ensure alignment between the scientific question and the statistical analysis. METHODS: We used simulations to investigate the impact of two basic approaches for handling missing tumor scans due to the pandemic: a "treatment policy" strategy, which consisted in ascribing events to the time they are observed, and a "hypothetical" approach of censoring patients with events during the shutdown period at the last assessment prior to that period. We computed the power of the logrank test, estimated hazard ratios (HR) using Cox models, and estimated median PFS times without and with a hypothetical 6-month shutdown period with no patient enrollment or tumor scans being performed, varying the shutdown starting times. RESULTS: Compared with the results in the absence of shutdown, the "treatment policy" strategy slightly overestimated median PFS proportionally to the timing of the shutdown period, but power was not affected. Except for one specific scenario, there was no impact on the estimated HR. In general, the pandemic had a greater impact on the analyses using the "hypothetical" strategy, which led to decreased power and overestimated median PFS times to a greater extent than the "treatment policy" strategy. CONCLUSION: As a rule, we suggest that the treatment policy approach, which conforms with the intent-to-treat principle, should be the primary analysis to avoid unnecessary loss of power and minimize bias in median PFS estimates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Disease-Free Survival , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Progression-Free Survival , Research Design
14.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(11): 9403-9410, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048295

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study identifies the impact of the absence of dental support for patients with cancer whose clinical dental care was interrupted by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: Individuals with oncologic diseases were selected from a telephone list of a Clinical Research Center (CRC) that specialized in the care of patients with cancer at the Bauru School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo (FOB/USP). The convenience sample comprised 280 patients (aged > 18 years) with a history of cancer that underwent dental treatment at the FOB/USP CRC in 2019 and did not receive care in 2020 owing to the pandemic. The participants completed a questionnaire sent via email or a text messaging application. Individuals receiving treatment or who were already treated for cancer were divided into two groups for data tabulation. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher's and chi-square tests. RESULTS: Of the 280 patients, 104 answered the questionnaire, and 75 (72.1%) were women. Among the women, 45 (60.0%) were receiving antineoplastic treatment, and 30 (40.0%) had already been treated. Among the men, 15 (51.7%) were receiving antineoplastic treatment, and 14 (48.3%) had already been treated. Regarding oral problems that arose during the pandemic, dental pain when eating hot or cold food or drinks (57.0%), muscle pain (53.8%), and difficulties when chewing (51.0%) were the most common reported among patients. Furthermore, most individuals reported not having received any type of remote dental follow-up, before being contacted by our team, which could contribute to reducing these oral problems. CONCLUSION: It is impossible to say whether the absence of dental support in cancer patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic had a negative impact on oral issue rates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Male , Humans , Female , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy
15.
Adv Ther ; 39(12): 5413-5432, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041327

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: There are concerns that patients in an immunocompromised state may be at risk for increased coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of patients with COVID-19 and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) or malignancies and evaluate their risk of developing severe COVID-19. METHODS: Cases of COVID-19 (ICD-10 code U07.1 or U07.2, or positive polymerase chain reaction or antigen test) among patients with IMIDs or malignancies were identified in the US-based Optum® Electronic Health Records database between 1 February 2020 and 3 March 2021. Age- and sex-standardized risks of severe COVID-19 were calculated by condition of interest. The risks were further adjusted by multiple covariates, and 95% confidence intervals were estimated. RESULTS: A total of 499,772 patients with COVID-19 were identified (mean [SD] age, 46.9 [20.7] years; 57.0% female). Patients with hematologic cancers (adjusted risk ratio [aRR] 2.0, 1.8-2.1), solid tumors (aRR 1.1, 1.1-1.1), or rheumatoid arthritis (aRR 1.2, 1.1-1.3) had a significantly higher risk of severe COVID-19 compared to the general population of patients with COVID-19. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (aRR 1.1, 0.9-1.2), psoriasis (aRR 1.0, 0.7-1.2), ulcerative colitis (aRR 0.9, 0.8-1.1), Crohn's disease (aRR 0.9, 0.7-1.0), or ankylosing spondylitis (aRR 0.8, 0.5-1.0) showed a comparable risk of severe COVID-19. Patients with atopic dermatitis (aRR 0.8, 0.7-0.9) or psoriatic arthritis (aRR 0.8, 0.6-1.0) showed a lower risk of severe COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of developing severe COVID-19 varied between the studied IMIDs and malignancies. Patients with hematologic cancers, solid tumors, or rheumatoid arthritis had significantly increased risk for severe COVID-19 compared to the general population. These findings highlight the need to protect and monitor immunocompromised patients such as those with IMIDs or malignancies as part of the strategy to control the pandemic worldwide.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid , COVID-19 , Hematologic Neoplasms , Neoplasms , Humans , Female , United States/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/complications , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Hematologic Neoplasms/epidemiology
16.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0274089, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2039406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Molecular tests in solid tumours for targeted therapies call for the need to ensure precision testing. To accomplish this participation in the External Quality Assessment Program (EQAS) is required. This evaluates the consistency of diagnostic testing procedures and offers guidance for improving quality. Outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic led to worldwide lockdown and disruption of healthcare services including participation in EQAS.The present study describes the extended scope of EQAS offered byMPQAP (Molecular Pathology Quality Assurance Program), the first proficiency test provider for solid tumor diagnostics in India. The study surveys the preparedness of molecular testing laboratories in routine diagnostics and participation for quality assessment scheme. METHODS: A documented guideline for measures and precautions to be carried by testing laboratories in performing routine diagnostic tests during the lockdown period were charted and distributed to all MPQAP participant centres. A survey was conducted for MPQAP participants to check whether laboratories were involved in COVID-19 testing and to evaluate the impact of lockdown on the operations of diagnostics procedures. From the acquired response of the survey, 2 cycles out of initially proposed 11 cycles were executed with transformed approach using digital tools and image interpretation modules. FINDINGS: Out of 25 solid tumour testing laboratories registered as participants, 15 consented to participate in survey. The summary of survey conveyed the impact of COVID-19onroutine operations of diagnostics tests such as shortcomings in inventory and human resource management. Thirteen participants showed active willingness and consented to participate in EQAS test scheme. INTERPRETATIONS: The survey findings and assessment of EQAS cycles endorsed the quality testing procedures carried by participating laboratories throughout the lockdown. It highlighted the utility of EQAS participation during pandemic along with emphasis on safety measures for continual improvement in quality of diagnostic services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , India/epidemiology , Laboratories , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quality Assurance, Health Care
17.
World J Surg Oncol ; 20(1): 302, 2022 Sep 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: India encountered two waves of COVID-19 pandemic with variability in its characteristics and severity. Concerns were raised over the safety of treatment, and higher morbidity was predicted for oncological surgery. The present study was conducted to evaluate and compare the rate of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing curative surgery for cancer before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: The prospectively obtained clinical data of 1576 patients treated between April 2019 and May 2021 was reviewed; of these, 959 patients were operated before COVID-19 and 617 during the pandemic. The data on complications, deaths, confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases, and COVID-19 infection among health workers (HCW) was extracted. RESULTS: A 35% fall in number of surgeries was seen during the COVID period; significant fall was seen in genital and esophageal cancer. There was no difference in postoperative complication; however, the postoperative mortality was significantly higher. A total of 71 patients had COVID-19, of which 62 were preoperative and 9 postoperative, while 30/38 healthcare workers contracted COVID-19, of which 7 had the infection twice and 3 were infected after two doses of vaccination; there was no mortality in healthcare workers. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates higher mortality rates after surgery in cancer patients, with no significant change in morbidity rates. A substantial proportion of HCWs were also infected though there was no mortality among this group. The results suggest higher mortality in cancer patients despite following the guidelines and protocols.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032937

ABSTRACT

Cancer patients tend to have a high psychological burden. Half of cancer patients suffer from severe affective disorders and anxiety disorders, while one-third struggle with mild forms of these. The COVID-19 pandemic is damaging the mental health of the population due to social restrictions. A growing number of studies note the role of COVID-19 anxiety in the health and quality of life of cancer patients. The purpose of this study is to estimate the level of COVID-19 anxiety among oncology patients and to test the utility of the FCV-19S scale in a population study of cancer patients. The study included 600 respondents (300 oncology patients and 300 control subjects not undergoing oncological treatment). The FCV-19S scale and the GAD-7 scale were used in the study. The results were interpreted according to the following verbal scale: 76-100%, high anxiety; 56-75%, moderate anxiety; 26-55%, low COVID-19 anxiety; <25%, no COVID-19 anxiety. In the analysis of the GAD-7 questionnaire results, the mean score obtained was 8.21 (min. 0; max. 21; SD 5.32). For 81% of respondents in the group of oncology patients, the total score indicated the presence of anxiety symptoms with varying degrees of severity; in the control group, this proportion was 55% of respondents. The FCV-19S scale score as a percentage was 57.4% for oncology patients, indicating a moderate level of fear of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and 30.3% for the control group, indicating a low level of fear of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. One-fifth of oncology patients were afraid of losing their lives due to the SARS-CoV-2 virus; in the control group, this proportion was 13% of respondents. Oncology patients were characterized by a higher prevalence of sleep disturbance than control group respondents, which was associated with greater anxiety. The study, therefore, shows that oncology patients have moderate levels of anxiety associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, and non-oncology patients show lower levels of anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Poland/epidemiology , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
19.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1437, 2022 07 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 related lockdowns may have affected engagement in health behaviours among the UK adult population. This prospective observational study assessed socio-demographic patterning in attempts to change and maintain a range of health behaviours and changes between two time points during the pandemic. METHODS: Adults aged 18 years and over (n = 4,978) were recruited using Dynata (an online market research platform) and the HealthWise Wales platform, supplemented through social media advertising. Online surveys were conducted in August/September 2020 when lockdown restrictions eased in the UK following the first major UK lockdown (survey phase 1) and in February/March 2021 during a further national lockdown (survey phase 2). Measures derived from the Cancer Awareness Measure included self-reported attempts to reduce alcohol consumption, increase fruit/vegetable consumption, increase physical activity, lose weight and reduce/stop smoking. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to assess individual health behaviour change attempts over time, adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, employment and education. RESULTS: Around half of participants in survey phase 1 reported trying to increase physical activity (n = 2607, 52.4%), increase fruit/vegetables (n = 2445, 49.1%) and lose weight (n = 2413, 48.5%), with 19.0% (n = 948) trying to reduce alcohol consumption among people who drink. Among the 738 participants who smoked, 51.5% (n = 380) were trying to reduce and 27.4% (n = 202) to stop smoking completely. Most behaviour change attempts were more common among women, younger adults and minority ethnic group participants. Efforts to reduce smoking (aOR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.82-1.17) and stop smoking (aOR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.80-1.20) did not differ significantly in phase 2 compared to phase 1. Similarly, changes over time in attempts to improve other health behaviours were not statistically significant: physical activity (aOR: 1.07; 95% CI: 0.99-1.16); weight loss (aOR: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.90-1.00); fruit/vegetable intake (aOR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.91-1.06) and alcohol use (aOR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.92-1.91). CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of participants reported attempts to change health behaviours in the initial survey phase. However, the lack of change observed over time indicated that overall motivation to engage in healthy behaviours was sustained among the UK adult population, from a period shortly after the first lockdown toward the end of the second prolonged lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Health Behavior , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Vegetables , Weight Loss
20.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 2501-2509, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2028962

ABSTRACT

To further describe the effect of the "fragile population" and their "higher-risk" comorbidities on prognosis among hospitalized Omicron patients, this observational cohort study enrolled hospitalized patients confirmed with SARS-CoV-2 during the 2022 Omicron wave in Shanghai, China. The primary outcome was progression to severe or critical cases. The secondary outcome was viral shedding time from the first positive SARS-CoV-2 detection. A total of 847 participants were enrolled, most of whom featured as advanced age (>70 years old: 30.34%), not fully vaccinated (55.84%), combined with at least 1 comorbidity (65.41%). Multivariate cox regression suggested age >70 years old (aHR[95%CI] 0.78[0.61-0.99]), chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 4-5 (aHR[95%CI] 0.61[0.46-0.80]), heart conditions (aHR[95%CI] 0.76[0.60-0.97]) would elongate viral shedding time and fully/booster vaccination (aHR[95%CI] 1.4 [1.14-1.72]) would shorten this duration. Multivariate logistic regression suggested CKD stage 4-5 (aHR[95%CI] 3.21[1.45-7.27]), cancer (aHR[95%CI] 9.52[4.19-22.61]), and long-term bedridden status (aHR[95%CI] 4.94[2.36-10.44]) were the "higher" risk factor compared with the elderly, heart conditions, metabolic disorders, isolated hypertension, etc. for severity while female (aHR[95%CI] 0.34[0.16-0.68]) and fully/booster Vaccination (aHR[95%CI] 0.35[0.12-0.87]) could provide protection from illness progression. CKD stage 4-5, cancer and long-term bedridden history were "higher-risk" factors among hospitalized Omicron patients for severity progression while full vaccination could provide protection from illness progression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Humans , Female , Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Prognosis , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology
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