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1.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 71(11): 2563-2570, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518960

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the extent of coronavirus infection in cancer patients along with their demographics, laboratory findings and outcomes in a tertiary care setting. METHODS: The study was conducted in Muscat, Oman, from March 24 to October 23, 2020. The data was collected from the cancer registry of the Directorate-General of Non-Communicable Diseases, Ministry of Health, Oman. Data of inpatient coronavirus cases were retrieved from the electronic medical records system of the Royal Hospital, Muscat, all tertiary hospitals linked electronically to the registry and the coronavirus registry of Oman. The data of cancer patients infected with coronavirus was analysed and compared with non-cancer coronavirus-infected patients. Data was analysed using IBM SPSS 2019 v26. RESULTS: Of the 16,260 cancer patients, 77(0.47%) were infected with COVID-19 compared to 111,837(2.17%) in the national population. Mortality among cancer patients with COVID-19 was high 27(35.1%) compared to 1,147(1.03%) in the national population. Cancer patients with COVID-19 also had diabetes 15(20%), hypertension 20(26%), renal complications 15(20%) and cardiac issues 9(12%). Of the total, 32(41.6%) cancer patients with COVID-19 had received active cancer treatment within the preceding 4 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: The data on coronavirus infection outcome is emerging at a rapid pace focussing on the impact of underlying diseases, and the capacity of healthcare systems. Oncologists should customise cancer management, while cancer patients must practise social distancing, and seek prompt evaluation of suspicious symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Neoplasms , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Oman/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 741188, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518572

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The first year of the COVID-19 pandemic has been highly disruptive for people with cancer. Furthermore, it has been shown that accrual to cancer trials dropped substantially in 2020. Building on findings from a previous pilot survey, the present study used qualitative methods to gain insights into attitudes towards participation in research studies amongst people who have experienced cancer, in the context of the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and Methods: We interviewed 13 participants from the UK, who were purposively sampled, including a broad sample of cancer types, and a mixture of individuals who have and have not taken part in research previously. Participants underwent semi-structured interviews (median interview duration: 47 min) and were asked open-ended questions about their attitude towards and experiences with COVID-19, and their attitude towards research participation. In addition to this, prompts were used to ask participants about concerns that were highlighted by our previous quantitative work on this topic, such as concerns about being older or having to travel to participate. Interview transcripts were analysed using a framework analysis approach. Results: Our findings suggest that cancer patient decision-making about research participation during an infectious disease pandemic may be a function of a basic cost-benefit analysis, which considers the benefit of taking part, either personally to themselves or to wider society. The benefit may then be weighed by the patient against the risk of being infected, which may be influenced by trust in the relevant clinicians/researchers; familiarity with the study location; provision of detailed information on safety protocols for infectious disease; and, in particular, the availability of safe transport to and from the study location. Discussion: Some cancer patients say that they would be less likely to participate in a research study in the middle of an infectious disease pandemic due to an increased risk to themselves. Patients' perceived risk to themselves from participating may be ameliorated via the provision of certain practical solutions that can be considered at the study protocol design stage, such as safe travel, information, and the use of staff and study sites familiar to the patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Attitude , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 7: 1513-1521, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496260

ABSTRACT

This report from ASCO's International Quality Steering Group summarizes early learnings on how the COVID-19 pandemic and its stresses have disproportionately affected cancer care delivery and its delivery systems across the world. This article shares perspectives from eight different countries, including Austria, Brazil, Ghana, Honduras, Ireland, the Philippines, South Africa, and the United Arab Emirates, which provide insight to their unique issues, challenges, and barriers to quality improvement in cancer care during the pandemic. These perspectives shed light on some key recommendations applicable on a global scale and focus on access to care, importance of expanding and developing new treatments for both COVID-19 and cancer, access to telemedicine, collecting and using COVID-19 and cancer registry data, establishing measures and guidelines to further enhance quality of care, and expanding communication among governments, health care systems, and health care providers. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer care and quality improvement has been and will continue to be felt across the globe, but this report aims to share these experiences and learnings and to assist ASCO's international members and our global fight against the pandemic and cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1996923, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493438

ABSTRACT

In this paper, Mixed Reality (MR) has been exploited in the operating rooms to perform laparoscopic and open surgery with the aim of providing remote mentoring to the medical doctors under training during the Covid-19 pandemic. The employed architecture, which has put together MR smartglasses, a Digital Imaging Player, and a Mixed Reality Toolkit, has been used for cancer surgery at the IRCCS Hospital 'Giovanni Paolo II' in southern Italy. The feasibility of using the conceived platform for real-time remote mentoring has been assessed on the basis of surveys distributed to the trainees after each surgery.


Subject(s)
Augmented Reality , COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Mentoring , Neoplasms , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Lancet Oncol ; 22(11): e474-e487, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488012

ABSTRACT

The increasing burden of cancer represents a substantial problem for Latin America and the Caribbean. Two Lancet Oncology Commissions in 2013 and 2015 highlighted potential interventions that could advance cancer care in the region by overcoming existing challenges. Areas requiring improvement included insufficient investment in cancer control, non-universal health coverage, fragmented health systems, inequitable concentration of cancer services, inadequate registries, delays in diagnosis or treatment initiation, and insufficient palliative services. Progress has been made in key areas but remains uneven across the region. An unforeseen challenge, the COVID-19 pandemic, strained all resources, and its negative effect on cancer control is expected to continue for years. In this Series paper, we summarise progress in several aspects of cancer control since 2015, and identify persistent barriers requiring commitment of additional resources to reduce the cancer burden in Latin America and the Caribbean.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Caribbean Region/epidemiology , Cost of Illness , Delivery of Health Care/economics , Early Detection of Cancer , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Medical Oncology/education , Neoplasms/epidemiology
7.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 31(11): 1372-1374, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485731

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to determine how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted on the effective management; and the outcome of pediatric oncology patients in Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital & Research Centre, Lahore. Data was retrospectively reviewed from 15 March to 15 June 2020 after the approval of Institutional Review Board Committee. A total of 258 patients on active oncology treatment between the study period were included. The total number of patients whose treatment was affected were 118 (45.7%), while 140 (54.3%) patients received treatment in time. There was total 34 (13.2%) patients relapsed, 23 (67.6%) patients in which treatment delayed, and 11 (32.4%) patients in which their treatment not delayed; while, n=218 (84.5%) were in remission, and 6 (2.3%) patients absconded. COVID-19 pandemic caused a sudden impediment in the treatment of pediatric oncology patients, and is likely to affect the long-term survival outcome of pediatric oncology patients. Key Words: Chemotherapy, Radiotherapy, Surgery, Long term outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Child , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470873

ABSTRACT

Cancer patients are exposed to a greater risk of COVID-19 infection, resulting in treatment delays and unnecessary hospitalizations. International authorities have suggested reducing visits to hospitals and guarantee continuity of care. We developed a home care project called Home Se-Cure (HSC) to guarantee the continuity of oral, intramuscular, and subcutaneous cancer therapy during COVID-19. The Home Se-Cure project included cancer patients living near Galliera Hospital. Patients received home visits by registered nurses (RNs), whoperformed blood tests and delivered cancer therapies. Patients were instructed to take drugs after blood test results and therapy confirmation by oncologists. Sixty-six patients decided to participate and 38 declined the service. A customer satisfaction questionnaire was administered to a subgroup of patients participating in the project. The most prevalent disease in the HSC group was prostate cancer. The mean age of the patients in HSC was 78.4 years and 68.9 in the decliner group. The majority of the HSC participants appreciated the project because they could stay at home (71%) and reduce the risk of COVID-19 contagion (67.7%). Compared to decliners, the time the study group saved was 2033 hours. HSC guaranteed the continuity of care during the COVID-19 pandemic by reducing the number of patients in the hospital and avoiding crowds in the waiting room.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Home Care Services , Neoplasms , Aged , Humans , Male , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470864

ABSTRACT

Adult cancer survivors have an increased prevalence of mental health comorbidities and other adverse late-effects interdependent with mental illness outcomes compared with the general population. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) heralds an era of renewed call for actions to identify sustainable modalities to facilitate the constructs of cancer survivorship care and health care delivery through physiological supportive domestic spaces. Building on the concept of therapeutic architecture, psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) indicators-with the central role in low-grade systemic inflammation-are associated with major psychiatric disorders and late effects of post-cancer treatment. Immune disturbances might mediate the effects of environmental determinants on behaviour and mental disorders. Whilst attention is paid to the non-objective measurements for examining the home environmental domains and mental health outcomes, little is gathered about the multidimensional effects on physiological responses. This exploratory review presents a first analysis of how addressing the PNI outcomes serves as a catalyst for therapeutic housing research. We argue the crucial component of housing in supporting the sustainable primary care and public health-based cancer survivorship care model, particularly in the psychopathology context. Ultimately, we illustrate a series of interventions aiming at how housing environmental attributes can trigger PNI profile changes and discuss the potential implications in the non-pharmacological treatment of cancer survivors and patients with mental morbidities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Adult , Housing , Humans , Mental Health , Morbidity , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Psychoneuroimmunology , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Acta Oncol ; 60(11): 1459-1465, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467204

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Cancer patients are considered to have a higher risk of dying and developing severe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). To date, there are few studies including co-morbidities and sociodemographic factors when investigating the outcome of COVID-19 in a cohort of cancer patients. In this study, we analyzed cancer patients that have been hospitalized due to COVID-19 during the first wave of the pandemic in Sweden to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on mortality and morbidity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively collected data on all patients with cancer that were hospitalized due to COVID-19-related symptoms at Uppsala University Hospital and Karolinska University Hospital between 1 March and 31 August 2020. The primary endpoint was COVID-19-related death and the secondary endpoint was to describe COVID-19 severity, defined as symptom severity (grades 0-4) and length of stay (LOS) at the university hospitals. RESULTS: In total, 193 patients were included among which 31% died due to COVID-19 and 8% died of other causes. In a multivariable analysis, older age >70 (OR 3.6; 95% CI [1.8-7.3], p < 0.001) and male gender (OR 2.8 [1.4-5.8], p = 0.005) were factors associated with higher likelihood of COVID-19-related death. Several comorbidities ≥2 (OR 5.4 [2.0-14.3], p = 0.001) was independently associated with COVID-19 severity. Treatment with chemotherapy within 90 days prior to COVID-19 diagnosis were not associated with COVID-19-related death or severity. CONCLUSION: Factors associated with higher likelihood of COVID-19-related death were older age and male gender. More severe COVID-19 symptoms were seen in patients with multiple comorbidities. We did not see any associations between COVID-19-related death or severity and recent treatment including chemotherapy. In summary, this supports a thorough assessment regarding potential risks with COVID-19 infection in patients with cancer, with a combination of individual risk factors in addition to cancer treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Aged , COVID-19 Testing , Cohort Studies , Humans , Male , Morbidity , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sweden/epidemiology
12.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 1068, 2021 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463248

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Objectives were to describe barriers to pediatric cancer symptom management care pathway implementation and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinical research evaluating their implementation. METHODS: We included 25 pediatric oncology hospitals in the United States that supported a grant submission to perform a cluster randomized trial in which the intervention encompassed care pathways for symptom management. A survey was distributed to site principal investigators prior to randomization to measure contextual elements related to care pathway implementation. Questions included the inner setting measures of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), study-specific potential barriers and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on clinical research. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare characteristics of institutions that agreed that their department supported the implementation of symptom management care pathways vs. institutions that did not agree. RESULTS: Of the 25 sites, one withdrew because of resource constraints and one did not respond, leaving 23 institutions. Among the seven CFIR constructs, the least supported was implementation climate; 57% agreed there was support, 39% agreed there was recognition and 39% agreed there was prioritization for symptom management care pathway implementation at their institution. Most common barriers were lack of person-time to create care pathways and champion their use (35%), lack of interest from physicians (30%) and lack of information technology resources (26%). Most sites reported no negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic across research activities. Sites with fewer pediatric cancer patients were more likely to agree that staff are supported to implement symptom management care pathways (P = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: The most commonly reported barriers to implementation were lack of support, recognition and prioritization. The COVID-19 pandemic may not be a major barrier to clinical research activities in pediatric oncology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Child , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Palliative Care , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
13.
Cancer Control ; 28: 10732748211045275, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463162

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has overwhelmed the capacity of healthcare systems worldwide. Cancer patients, in particular, are vulnerable and oncology departments drastically needed to modify their care systems and established new priorities. We evaluated the impact of SARS-CoV-2 on the activity of a single cancer center. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of (i) volumes of oncological activities (2020 vs 2019), (ii) patients' perception rate of the preventive measures, (iii) patients' SARS-CoV-2 infections, clinical signs thereof, and (iv) new diagnoses made during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. RESULTS: As compared with a similar time frame in 2019, the overall activity in total numbers of outpatient chemotherapy administrations and specialist visits was not statistically different (P = .961 and P = .252), while inpatient admissions decreased for both medical oncology and thoracic oncology (18% (P = .0018) and 44% (P < .0001), respectively). Cancer diagnosis plummeted (-34%), but no stage shift could be demonstrated.Acceptance and adoption of hygienic measures was high, as measured by a targeted questionnaire (>85%). However, only 46.2% of responding patients regarded telemedicine, although widely deployed, as an efficient surrogate to a consultation.Thirty-three patients developed SARS-CoV-2, 27 were hospitalized, and 11 died within this time frame. These infected patients were younger, current smokers, and suffered more comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS: This retrospective cohort analysis adds to the evidence that continuation of active cancer therapy and specialist visits is feasible and safe with the implementation of telemedicine. These data further confirm the impact of SARS-CoV-2 on cancer care management, cancer diagnosis, and impact of infection on cancer patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Cancer Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Age Factors , Comorbidity , Cyclopentanes , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/mortality , Organosilicon Compounds , Pandemics , Perception , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 09 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463642

ABSTRACT

The notion of candidacy emerged three decades ago through Davison and colleagues' exploration of people's understanding of the causes of coronary heart disease. Candidacy was a mechanism to estimate one's own or others risk of disease informed by their lay epidemiology. It could predict who would develop illness or explain why someone succumbed to it. Candidacy's predictive ability, however, was fallible, and it was from this perspective that the public's reticence to adhere to prevention messages could be explained, as ultimately anybody could be 'at-risk'. This work continues to resonate in health research, with over 700 citations of Davison's Candidacy paper. Less explored however, is the candidacy framework in its entirety in other illness spheres, where prevention efforts could potentially impact health outcomes. This paper revisits the candidacy framework to reconsider it use within prevention. In doing so, candidacy within coronary heart disease, suicide prevention, diabetes, and cancer will be examined, and key components of candidacy and how people negotiate their candidacy within differing disease contexts will be uncovered. The applicability of candidacy to address modifiable breast cancer risk factors or cancer prevention more broadly will be considered, as will the implications for public health policy.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Suicide , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/prevention & control
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 20073, 2021 10 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462039

ABSTRACT

Kidney transplantation recipients (KTR) with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are at higher risk of death than general population. However, mortality risk factors in KTR are still not clearly identified. Our objective was to systematically analyze published evidence for risk factors associated with mortality in COVID-19 KTR. Electronic databases were searched for eligible studies on 1 August 2021. All prospective and retrospective studies of COVID-19 in KTR were considered eligible without language restriction. Since data in case reports and series could potentially be subsets of larger studies, only studies with ≥ 50 patients were included. Random-effects model meta-analysis was used to calculate weighted mean difference (WMD) and pooled odds ratio (OR) of factors associated with mortality. From a total 1,137 articles retrieved, 13 were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis comprising 4,440 KTR. Compared with survivors, non-survivors were significantly older (WMD 10.5 years, 95% CI 9.3-11.8). KTR of deceased donor were at higher risk of death (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.10-2.74). Comorbidities including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and active cancer significantly increased mortality risk. KTR with dyspnea (OR 5.68, 95% CI 2.11-15.33) and pneumonia (OR 10.64, 95% CI 3.37-33.55) at presentation were at higher mortality risk, while diarrhea decreased the risk (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.47-0.78). Acute kidney injury was associated with mortality (OR 3.24, 95% CI 1.36-7.70). Inflammatory markers were significantly higher in the non-survivors, including C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and interleukine-6. A number of COVID-19 mortality risk factors were identified from KTR patient characteristics, presenting symptoms, and laboratory investigations. KTR with these risk factors should receive more intensive monitoring and early therapeutic interventions to optimize health outcomes.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Kidney Transplantation , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/mortality , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Transplant Recipients
16.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 30(10): 1884-1894, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450633

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We described the demographics, cancer subtypes, comorbidities, and outcomes of patients with a history of cancer and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Second, we compared patients hospitalized with COVID-19 to patients diagnosed with COVID-19 and patients hospitalized with influenza. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study using eight routinely collected health care databases from Spain and the United States, standardized to the Observational Medical Outcome Partnership common data model. Three cohorts of patients with a history of cancer were included: (i) diagnosed with COVID-19, (ii) hospitalized with COVID-19, and (iii) hospitalized with influenza in 2017 to 2018. Patients were followed from index date to 30 days or death. We reported demographics, cancer subtypes, comorbidities, and 30-day outcomes. RESULTS: We included 366,050 and 119,597 patients diagnosed and hospitalized with COVID-19, respectively. Prostate and breast cancers were the most frequent cancers (range: 5%-18% and 1%-14% in the diagnosed cohort, respectively). Hematologic malignancies were also frequent, with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma being among the five most common cancer subtypes in the diagnosed cohort. Overall, patients were aged above 65 years and had multiple comorbidities. Occurrence of death ranged from 2% to 14% and from 6% to 26% in the diagnosed and hospitalized COVID-19 cohorts, respectively. Patients hospitalized with influenza (n = 67,743) had a similar distribution of cancer subtypes, sex, age, and comorbidities but lower occurrence of adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with a history of cancer and COVID-19 had multiple comorbidities and a high occurrence of COVID-19-related events. Hematologic malignancies were frequent. IMPACT: This study provides epidemiologic characteristics that can inform clinical care and etiologic studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Databases, Factual , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Immunosuppression/adverse effects , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
18.
Curr Oncol ; 28(5): 3795-3803, 2021 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444125

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic made it necessary to change established structures of medical counseling services and quickly establish digital counseling formats to ensure continuity of care. In this context, we offered telephone and video-telephonic counseling in addition to traditional face-to-face counseling in the office. METHODS: Patients (n = 100) of the Cancer Counseling Center, Tübingen, were asked to complete a questionnaire to assess the acceptance of the counseling format following each counseling session (office, telephone, and video) in the period between July 2020 and February 2021. The questionnaire included the subject areas of patient characterization, assessment of therapeutic contact, therapeutic relationship, and hurdles and was used in this exploratory care study. RESULTS: The satisfaction and acceptance of the three counseling formats (office, telephone, and video) were rated as "good" to "very good" in the three subgroups (range 1-6, office M = 1.2, telephone M = 1.3, video M = 1.4). Likewise, the "therapeutic relationship" achieved high ratings in terms of establishment of a therapeutic relationship in all three subgroups (office M = 5.7, telephone M = 5.0, video M = 5.0). The type of contact (office and video counseling) achieved a significant main effect on the therapeutic relationship for items such as "I believe that counseling is helping me" (F(2,97) = 4.80, p = 0.01) and "I feel that I can rely on the counselor/therapist" (F(2,97) = 3.29, p = 0.04). The "hurdles" were rated as minor and tolerable (office M = 1.3, telephone M = 1.3, video M = 1.4). Predictor analyses showed that there was no effect of age and gender on the acceptance of digital counseling formats in the present sample. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: On the basis of this survey, it can be concluded that digital counseling formats were perceived by patients as a promising addition to the classic face-to-face setting. In addition, it can be stated that the digital formats (telephone and video) were not generally preferred to face-to-face counseling, but that the innovative telecounseling was accepted and perceived with great satisfaction and acceptance. Accordingly, the additional use of digital counseling formats could be an opportunity to enrich and expand the existing presence structures also after the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Counseling , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Asian Pac J Cancer Prev ; 22(9): 2945-2950, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441449

ABSTRACT

The COVID-pandemic has shown significant impact on cancer care from early detection, management plan to clinical outcomes of cancer patients. The Asian National Cancer Centres Alliance (ANCCA) has put together the 9 "Ps" as guidelines for cancer programs to better prepare for the next pandemic. The 9 "Ps" are Priority, Protocols and Processes, Patients, People, Personal Protective Equipments (PPEs), Pharmaceuticals, Places, Preparedness, and Politics. Priority: to maintain cancer care as a key priority in the health system response even during a global infectious disease pandemic. Protocol and processes: to develop a set of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) and have relevant expertise to man the Disease Outbreak Response (DORS) Taskforce before an outbreak. Patients: to prioritize patient safety in the event of an outbreak and the need to reschedule cancer management plan, supported by tele-consultation and use of artificial intelligence technology. People: to have business continuity planning to support surge capacity. PPEs and Pharmaceuticals: to develop plan for stockpiles management, build local manufacturing capacity and disseminate information on proper use and reduce wastage. Places: to design and build cancer care facilities to cater for the need of triaging, infection control, isolation and segregation. Preparedness: to invest early on manpower building and technology innovations through multisectoral and international collaborations. Politics: to ensure leadership which bring trust, cohesion and solidarity for successful response to pandemic and mitigate negative impact on the healthcare system.


Subject(s)
Cancer Care Facilities/organization & administration , Disaster Planning/methods , Infection Control/methods , Neoplasms/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Regional Health Planning/organization & administration , Telemedicine/methods , Artificial Intelligence , Asia/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology
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