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1.
Mol Cells ; 44(12): 861-878, 2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592997

ABSTRACT

The human genome contains many retroviral elements called human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), resulting from the integration of retroviruses throughout evolution. HERVs once were considered inactive junk because they are not replication-competent, primarily localized in the heterochromatin, and silenced by methylation. But HERVs are now clearly shown to actively regulate gene expression in various physiological and pathological conditions such as developmental processes, immune regulation, cancers, autoimmune diseases, and neurological disorders. Recent studies report that HERVs are activated in patients suffering from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the current pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) infection. In this review, we describe internal and external factors that influence HERV activities. We also present evidence showing the gene regulatory activity of HERV LTRs (long terminal repeats) in model organisms such as mice, rats, zebrafish, and invertebrate models of worms and flies. Finally, we discuss several molecular and cellular pathways involving various transcription factors and receptors, through which HERVs affect downstream cellular and physiological events such as epigenetic modifications, calcium influx, protein phosphorylation, and cytokine release. Understanding how HERVs participate in various physiological and pathological processes will help develop a strategy to generate effective therapeutic approaches targeting HERVs.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Endogenous Retroviruses/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation , Models, Animal , Neoplasms/genetics , Terminal Repeat Sequences/genetics , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/virology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Neoplasms/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
2.
BMC Genomics ; 22(Suppl 5): 518, 2021 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523282

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: All diseases containing genetic material undergo genetic evolution and give rise to heterogeneity including cancer and infection. Although these illnesses are biologically very different, the ability for phylogenetic retrodiction based on the genomic reads is common between them and thus tree-based principles and assumptions are shared. Just as the different frequencies of tumor genomic variants presupposes the existence of multiple tumor clones and provides a handle to computationally infer them, we postulate that the different variant frequencies in viral reads offers the means to infer multiple co-infecting sublineages. RESULTS: We present a common methodological framework to infer the phylogenomics from genomic data, be it reads of SARS-CoV-2 of multiple COVID-19 patients or bulk DNAseq of the tumor of a cancer patient. We describe the Concerti computational framework for inferring phylogenies in each of the two scenarios.To demonstrate the accuracy of the method, we reproduce some known results in both scenarios. We also make some additional discoveries. CONCLUSIONS: Concerti successfully extracts and integrates information from multi-point samples, enabling the discovery of clinically plausible phylogenetic trees that capture the heterogeneity known to exist both spatially and temporally. These models can have direct therapeutic implications by highlighting "birth" of clones that may harbor resistance mechanisms to treatment, "death" of subclones with drug targets, and acquisition of functionally pertinent mutations in clones that may have seemed clinically irrelevant. Specifically in this paper we uncover new potential parallel mutations in the evolution of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. In the context of cancer, we identify new clones harboring resistant mutations to therapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Clone Cells , Humans , Mutation , Neoplasms/genetics , Phylogeny , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Mech Ageing Dev ; 199: 111551, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492370

ABSTRACT

Polyphenols are chemopreventive through the induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated proteins and anti-inflammatory pathways. These pathways, encoding cytoprotective vitagenes, include heat shock proteins, such as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), as well as glutathione redox system to protect against cancer initiation and progression. Phytochemicals exhibit biphasic dose responses on cancer cells, activating at low dose, signaling pathways resulting in upregulation of vitagenes, as in the case of the Nrf2 pathway upregulated by hydroxytyrosol (HT) or curcumin and NAD/NADH-sirtuin-1 activated by resveratrol. Here, the importance of vitagenes in redox stress response and autophagy mechanisms, as well as the potential use of dietary antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of multiple types of cancer are discussed. We also discuss the possible relationship between SARS-CoV-2, inflammation and cancer, exploiting innovative therapeutic approaches with HT-rich aqueous olive pulp extract (Hidrox®), a natural polyphenolic formulation, as well as the rationale of Vitamin D supplementation. Finally, we describe innovative approaches with organoids technology to study human carcinogenesis in preclinical models from basic cancer research to clinical practice, suggesting patient-derived organoids as an innovative tool to test drug toxicity and drive personalized therapy.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Drug Development , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , Organoids/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Polyphenols/pharmacology , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/genetics , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/pathology , Organoids/metabolism , Oxidation-Reduction , Oxidative Stress/genetics
4.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 5975, 2021 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467103

ABSTRACT

Acquired somatic mutations in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (clonal hematopoiesis or CH) are associated with advanced age, increased risk of cardiovascular and malignant diseases, and decreased overall survival. These adverse sequelae may be mediated by altered inflammatory profiles observed in patients with CH. A pro-inflammatory immunologic profile is also associated with worse outcomes of certain infections, including SARS-CoV-2 and its associated disease Covid-19. Whether CH predisposes to severe Covid-19 or other infections is unknown. Among 525 individuals with Covid-19 from Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) and the Korean Clonal Hematopoiesis (KoCH) consortia, we show that CH is associated with severe Covid-19 outcomes (OR = 1.85, 95%=1.15-2.99, p = 0.01), in particular CH characterized by non-cancer driver mutations (OR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.15-3.50, p = 0.01). We further explore the relationship between CH and risk of other infections in 14,211 solid tumor patients at MSK. CH is significantly associated with risk of Clostridium Difficile (HR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.22-3.30, p = 6×10-3) and Streptococcus/Enterococcus infections (HR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.15-2.13, p = 5×10-3). These findings suggest a relationship between CH and risk of severe infections that warrants further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/pathology , Clonal Hematopoiesis/genetics , Hematopoietic Stem Cells/virology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/immunology , Child , Child, Preschool , Clonal Hematopoiesis/immunology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation/immunology , Neoplasms/genetics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19839, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454816

ABSTRACT

Computational drug repositioning aims at ranking and selecting existing drugs for novel diseases or novel use in old diseases. In silico drug screening has the potential for speeding up considerably the shortlisting of promising candidates in response to outbreaks of diseases such as COVID-19 for which no satisfactory cure has yet been found. We describe DrugMerge as a methodology for preclinical computational drug repositioning based on merging multiple drug rankings obtained with an ensemble of disease active subnetworks. DrugMerge uses differential transcriptomic data on drugs and diseases in the context of a large gene co-expression network. Experiments with four benchmark diseases demonstrate that our method detects in first position drugs in clinical use for the specified disease, in all four cases. Application of DrugMerge to COVID-19 found rankings with many drugs currently in clinical trials for COVID-19 in top positions, thus showing that DrugMerge can mimic human expert judgment.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning/methods , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Antiviral Agents , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Genetic , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
7.
Cancer Res Treat ; 53(3): 650-656, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403959

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has spread worldwide rapidly and patients with cancer have been considered as a vulnerable group for this infection. This study aimed to examine the expressions of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) in tumor tissues of six common cancer types. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The expression levels of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 in tumors and control samples were obtained from online databases. Survival prognosis and biological functions of these genes were investigated for each tumor type. RESULTS: There was the overexpression of ACE2 in colon and stomach adenocarcinomas compared to controls, meanwhile colon and prostate adenocarcinomas showed a significantly higher expression of TMPRSS2. Additionally, survival prognosis analysis has demonstrated that upregulation of ACE2 in liver hepatocellular carcinoma was associated with higher overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.65; p=0.016) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.66; p=0.007), while overexpression of TMPRSS2 was associated with a 26% reduced risk of death in lung adenocarcinoma (p=0.047) but 50% increased risk of death in breast invasive carcinoma (p=0.015). CONCLUSION: There is a need to take extra precautions for COVID-19 in patients with colorectal cancer, stomach cancer, and lung cancer. Further information on other types of cancer at different stages should be investigated.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/diagnosis , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Adenocarcinoma/complications , Adenocarcinoma/diagnosis , Adenocarcinoma/epidemiology , Adenocarcinoma/genetics , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Breast Neoplasms/genetics , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , Case-Control Studies , Databases as Topic , Female , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/complications , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/diagnosis , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/genetics , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Liver Neoplasms/complications , Liver Neoplasms/diagnosis , Liver Neoplasms/epidemiology , Liver Neoplasms/genetics , Lung Neoplasms/complications , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/genetics , Male , Mutation , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prognosis , Prostatic Neoplasms/complications , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnosis , Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Prostatic Neoplasms/genetics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Survival Analysis
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(3)2021 Jan 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389387

ABSTRACT

In this review, we discuss the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA), which is the master regulator of MHC class II gene expression. CIITA is the founding member of the mammalian nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) protein family but stood apart for a long time as the only transcriptional regulator. More recently, it was found that its closest homolog, NLRC5 (NLR protein caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD)-containing 5), is a regulator of MHC-I gene expression. Both act as non-DNA-binding activators through multiple protein-protein interactions with an MHC enhanceosome complex that binds cooperatively to a highly conserved combinatorial cis-acting module. Thus, the regulation of MHC-II expression is regulated largely through the differential expression of CIITA. In addition to the well-defined role of CIITA in MHC-II GENE regulation, we will discuss several other aspects of CIITA functions, such as its role in cancer, its role as a viral restriction element contributing to intrinsic immunity, and lastly, its very recently discovered role as an inhibitor of Ebola and SARS-Cov-2 virus replication. We will briefly touch upon the recently discovered role of NLRP3 as a transcriptional regulator, which suggests that transcriptional regulation is, after all, not such an unusual feature for NLR proteins.


Subject(s)
Genes, MHC Class II , NLR Proteins/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Trans-Activators/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Ebolavirus/physiology , Gene Expression Regulation , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/genetics , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/metabolism , Humans , NLR Proteins/genetics , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Protein Interaction Maps , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Trans-Activators/genetics , Virus Replication
10.
Curr Opin Genet Dev ; 66: iii-iv, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358221
11.
Nat Rev Drug Discov ; 20(8): 629-651, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341001

ABSTRACT

Therapeutic targeting of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), represents an attractive approach for the treatment of cancers, as well as many other diseases. Over the past decade, substantial effort has been made towards the clinical application of RNA-based therapeutics, employing mostly antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNAs, with several gaining FDA approval. However, trial results have so far been ambivalent, with some studies reporting potent effects whereas others demonstrated limited efficacy or toxicity. Alternative entities such as antimiRNAs are undergoing clinical testing, and lncRNA-based therapeutics are gaining interest. In this Perspective, we discuss key challenges facing ncRNA therapeutics - including issues associated with specificity, delivery and tolerability - and focus on promising emerging approaches that aim to boost their success.


Subject(s)
Genetic Therapy/methods , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Neoplasms/therapy , RNA, Long Noncoding/genetics , Animals , Humans , Neoplasms/genetics
12.
Cancer Treat Res Commun ; 28: 100425, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Malignancy is one of the prime global causes of mortality. Cancer Patients suffering from SARS-CoV-2 have demonstrated higher rates of severe complications exacerbating towards death. Possible genetic and epigenetic alterations may exist in cancer patients which have the potential to contribute towards their increased vulnerability towards COVID-19. METHOD: An exhaustive literature search using 'COVID-19', 'SARS-CoV-2', 'Cancer', 'Malignancy', 'Relationships', Interlinks', 'Genetic', 'Epigenetic', 'Epidemiological studies', 'Clinical Studies', 'Vaccination', 'Vaccine scenario' were conducted in PubMed and EMBASE till 2nd June 2021. RESULT: In this narrative review, 17 epidemiological studies were listed which focused on clinical parameters of several malignancy patient cohorts who contracted COVID-19. Besides, genetic and epigenetic alterations seen among cancer patients are also discussed which may plausibly increase the vulnerability of cancer patients to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Also, global vaccination scenario among malignant patients along with the necessity to prioritize them in the vaccination campaigns are also elaborated. CONCLUSION: Genetic and epigenetic modifications present in ACE2, TMPRSS2, IL-6 and several cytokines require more in-depth research to elucidate the shared mechanisms of malignancy and SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , Neoplasms/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Biomarkers, Tumor/analysis , Biomarkers, Tumor/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Clinical Trials as Topic , Drug Carriers/administration & dosage , Epigenesis, Genetic , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Interleukin-6/genetics , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/immunology , Vaccination
13.
J Pathol ; 254(4): 303-306, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258101

ABSTRACT

The 2021 Annual Review Issue of The Journal of Pathology contains 14 invited reviews on current research areas of particular importance in pathology. The subjects included here reflect the broad range of interests covered by the journal, including both basic and applied research fields but always with the aim of improving our understanding of human disease. This year, our reviews encompass the huge impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, the development and application of biomarkers for immune checkpoint inhibitors, recent advances in multiplexing antigen/nucleic acid detection in situ, the use of genomics to aid drug discovery, organoid methodologies in research, the microbiome in cancer, the role of macrophage-stroma interactions in fibrosis, and TGF-ß as a driver of fibrosis in multiple pathologies. Other reviews revisit the p53 field and its lack of clinical impact to date, dissect the genetics of mitochondrial diseases, summarise the cells of origin and genetics of sarcomagenesis, provide new data on the role of TRIM28 in tumour predisposition, review our current understanding of cancer stem cell niches, and the function and regulation of p63. The reviews are authored by experts in their field from academia and industry, and provide comprehensive updates of the chosen areas, in which there has been considerable recent progress. © 2021 The Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , COVID-19/pathology , Genomics/methods , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/genetics , Organoids/pathology , United Kingdom
14.
Bioessays ; 43(8): e2000289, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1251911

ABSTRACT

Despite huge efforts towards understanding the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pathogenesis, little is known about the long-term consequences of the disease. Here, we critically review existing literature about oncogenesis as a potential long-term effect of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Like other viral infections, SARS-CoV-2 may promote cancer onset by inhibiting tumor suppressor genes. We conclude that, although unlikely, such hypothesis cannot be excluded a priori and we delineate an experimental approach to address it. Also see the video abstract here: https://youtu.be/TBUTDSLR7vY.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Virus Diseases , Humans , Neoplasms/genetics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Exp Biol Med (Maywood) ; 246(15): 1681-1687, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243784

ABSTRACT

Mediator is an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex that mediates the interaction between different proteins as a basic linker in the transcription mechanism of eukaryotes. It interacts with RNA polymerase II and participates in the process of gene expression. Mediator complex subunit 19 or regulation by oxygen 3, or lung cancer metastasis-related protein 1 is located at the head of the mediator complex; it is a multi-protein co-activator that induces the transcription of RNA polymerase II by DNA transcription factors. It is a tumor-related gene that plays an important role in transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis and is closely related to the occurrence and development of the cancers of the lung, bladder, skin, etc. Here, we used the structure of mediator complex subunit 19 to review its role in tumor progression, fat metabolism, drug therapy, as well as the novel coronavirus, which has attracted much attention at present, suggesting that mediator complex subunit 19 has broad application in the occurrence and development of clinical diseases. As a tumor-related gene, the role and mechanism of mediator complex subunit 19 in the regulation of tumor growth could be of great significance for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of mediator complex subunit 19 -related tumors.


Subject(s)
Host-Pathogen Interactions/physiology , Mediator Complex/physiology , Neoplasms/pathology , Apoptosis/physiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Cycle/physiology , Cell Movement , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Humans , Neoplasms/genetics
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(9)2021 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231494

ABSTRACT

Artificial intelligence, or the discipline of developing computational algorithms able to perform tasks that requires human intelligence, offers the opportunity to improve our idea and delivery of precision medicine. Here, we provide an overview of artificial intelligence approaches for the analysis of large-scale RNA-sequencing datasets in cancer. We present the major solutions to disentangle inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity of transcriptome profiles for an effective improvement of patient management. We outline the contributions of learning algorithms to the needs of cancer genomics, from identifying rare cancer subtypes to personalizing therapeutic treatments.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Neoplasms/genetics , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , Algorithms , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Humans , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/pathology , Precision Medicine/methods , Prognosis , Tumor Microenvironment/genetics
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 9905, 2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223111

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected African American populations disproportionately with respect to prevalence, and mortality. Expression profiles represent snapshots of combined genetic, socio-environmental (including socioeconomic and environmental factors), and physiological effects on the molecular phenotype. As such, they have potential to improve biological understanding of differences among populations, and provide therapeutic biomarkers and environmental mitigation strategies. Here, we undertook a large-scale assessment of patterns of gene expression between African Americans and European Americans, mining RNA-Seq data from 25 non-diseased and diseased (tumor) tissue-types. We observed the widespread enrichment of pathways implicated in COVID-19 and integral to inflammation and reactive oxygen stress. Chemokine CCL3L3 expression is up-regulated in African Americans. GSTM1, encoding a glutathione S-transferase that metabolizes reactive oxygen species and xenobiotics, is upregulated. The little-studied F8A2 gene is up to 40-fold more highly expressed in African Americans; F8A2 encodes HAP40 protein, which mediates endosome movement, potentially altering the cellular response to SARS-CoV-2. African American expression signatures, superimposed on single cell-RNA reference data, reveal increased number or activity of esophageal glandular cells and lung ACE2-positive basal keratinocytes. Our findings establish basal prognostic signatures that can be used to refine approaches to minimize risk of severe infection and improve precision treatment of COVID-19 for African Americans. To enable dissection of causes of divergent molecular phenotypes, we advocate routine inclusion of metadata on genomic and socio-environmental factors for human RNA-sequencing studies.


Subject(s)
African Americans/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Neoplasms/genetics , /genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Chemokine CCL3/genetics , Gene Regulatory Networks , Glutathione Transferase/genetics , Humans , Neoplasms/classification , Neoplasms/ethnology , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Pandemics , Prognosis , RNA-Seq/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology
18.
Anal Biochem ; 627: 114242, 2021 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222826

ABSTRACT

This paper introduces a new hybrid approach (DBH) for solving gene selection problem that incorporates the strengths of two existing metaheuristics: binary dragonfly algorithm (BDF) and binary black hole algorithm (BBHA). This hybridization aims to identify a limited and stable set of discriminative genes without sacrificing classification accuracy, whereas most current methods have encountered challenges in extracting disease-related information from a vast amount of redundant genes. The proposed approach first applies the minimum redundancy maximum relevancy (MRMR) filter method to reduce the dimensionality of feature space and then utilizes the suggested hybrid DBH algorithm to determine a smaller set of significant genes. The proposed approach was evaluated on eight benchmark gene expression datasets, and then, was compared against the latest state-of-art techniques to demonstrate algorithm efficiency. The comparative study shows that the proposed approach achieves a significant improvement as compared with existing methods in terms of classification accuracy and the number of selected genes. Moreover, the performance of the suggested method was examined on real RNA-Seq coronavirus-related gene expression data of asthmatic patients for selecting the most significant genes in order to improve the discriminative accuracy of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). ACE2, as a coronavirus receptor, is a biomarker that helps to classify infected patients from uninfected in order to identify subgroups at risk for COVID-19. The result denotes that the suggested MRMR-DBH approach represents a very promising framework for finding a new combination of most discriminative genes with high classification accuracy.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/genetics , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Support Vector Machine , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Gene Expression Profiling , Humans , Microarray Analysis , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/genetics
20.
Biomolecules ; 11(4)2021 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196027

ABSTRACT

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) cleave extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, cytokines, and receptors to influence organ development, architecture, function, and the systemic and cell-specific responses to diseases and pharmacological drugs. Conversely, many diseases (such as atherosclerosis, arthritis, bacterial infections (tuberculosis), viral infections (COVID-19), and cancer), cholesterol-lowering drugs (such as statins), and tetracycline-class antibiotics (such as doxycycline) alter MMP activity through transcriptional, translational, and post-translational mechanisms. In this review, we summarize evidence that the aforementioned diseases and drugs exert significant epigenetic pressure on genes encoding MMPs, tissue inhibitors of MMPs, and factors that transcriptionally regulate the expression of MMPs. Our understanding of human pathologies associated with alterations in the proteolytic activity of MMPs must consider that these pathologies and their medicinal treatments may impose epigenetic pressure on the expression of MMP genes. Whether the epigenetic mechanisms affecting the activity of MMPs can be therapeutically targeted warrants further research.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Drug Discovery , Epigenesis, Genetic/drug effects , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Matrix Metalloproteinases/genetics , Tetracyclines/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Bacterial Infections/genetics , Bone Diseases/drug therapy , Bone Diseases/genetics , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/genetics , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Molecular Targeted Therapy , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/genetics , Tetracyclines/therapeutic use , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/genetics
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