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1.
Cell Death Dis ; 12(12): 1156, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585874

ABSTRACT

Lots of cell death initiator and effector molecules, signalling pathways and subcellular sites have been identified as key mediators in both cell death processes in cancer. The XDeathDB visualization platform provides a comprehensive cell death and their crosstalk resource for deciphering the signaling network organization of interactions among different cell death modes associated with 1461 cancer types and COVID-19, with an aim to understand the molecular mechanisms of physiological cell death in disease and facilitate systems-oriented novel drug discovery in inducing cell deaths properly. Apoptosis, autosis, efferocytosis, ferroptosis, immunogenic cell death, intrinsic apoptosis, lysosomal cell death, mitotic cell death, mitochondrial permeability transition, necroptosis, parthanatos, and pyroptosis related to 12 cell deaths and their crosstalk can be observed systematically by the platform. Big data for cell death gene-disease associations, gene-cell death pathway associations, pathway-cell death mode associations, and cell death-cell death associations is collected by literature review articles and public database from iRefIndex, STRING, BioGRID, Reactom, Pathway's commons, DisGeNET, DrugBank, and Therapeutic Target Database (TTD). An interactive webtool, XDeathDB, is built by web applications with R-Shiny, JavaScript (JS) and Shiny Server Iso. With this platform, users can search specific interactions from vast interdependent networks that occur in the realm of cell death. A multilayer spectral graph clustering method that performs convex layer aggregation to identify crosstalk function among cell death modes for a specific cancer. 147 hallmark genes of cell death could be observed in detail in these networks. These potential druggable targets are displayed systematically and tailoring networks to visualize specified relations is available to fulfil user-specific needs. Users can access XDeathDB for free at https://pcm2019.shinyapps.io/XDeathDB/ .


Subject(s)
Cell Death/physiology , Regulated Cell Death/physiology , Signal Transduction/physiology , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cluster Analysis , Databases, Factual , Humans , Necroptosis , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/physiopathology , Phagocytosis , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Software
2.
Mech Ageing Dev ; 199: 111551, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492370

ABSTRACT

Polyphenols are chemopreventive through the induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated proteins and anti-inflammatory pathways. These pathways, encoding cytoprotective vitagenes, include heat shock proteins, such as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), as well as glutathione redox system to protect against cancer initiation and progression. Phytochemicals exhibit biphasic dose responses on cancer cells, activating at low dose, signaling pathways resulting in upregulation of vitagenes, as in the case of the Nrf2 pathway upregulated by hydroxytyrosol (HT) or curcumin and NAD/NADH-sirtuin-1 activated by resveratrol. Here, the importance of vitagenes in redox stress response and autophagy mechanisms, as well as the potential use of dietary antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of multiple types of cancer are discussed. We also discuss the possible relationship between SARS-CoV-2, inflammation and cancer, exploiting innovative therapeutic approaches with HT-rich aqueous olive pulp extract (Hidrox®), a natural polyphenolic formulation, as well as the rationale of Vitamin D supplementation. Finally, we describe innovative approaches with organoids technology to study human carcinogenesis in preclinical models from basic cancer research to clinical practice, suggesting patient-derived organoids as an innovative tool to test drug toxicity and drive personalized therapy.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Drug Development , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , Organoids/drug effects , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Polyphenols/pharmacology , Vitamin D/pharmacology , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Humans , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/genetics , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/pathology , Organoids/metabolism , Oxidation-Reduction , Oxidative Stress/genetics
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(20)2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477961

ABSTRACT

Chronic diseases and viral infections have threatened human life over the ages and constitute the main reason for increasing death globally. The rising burden of these diseases extends to negatively affecting the economy and trading globally, as well as daily life, which requires inexpensive, novel, and safe therapeutics. Therefore, scientists have paid close attention to probiotics as safe remedies to combat these morbidities owing to their health benefits and biotherapeutic effects. Probiotics have been broadly adopted as functional foods, nutraceuticals, and food supplements to improve human health and prevent some morbidity. Intriguingly, recent research indicates that probiotics are a promising solution for treating and prophylactic against certain dangerous diseases. Probiotics could also be associated with their essential role in animating the immune system to fight COVID-19 infection. This comprehensive review concentrates on the newest literature on probiotics and their metabolism in treating life-threatening diseases, including immune disorders, pathogens, inflammatory and allergic diseases, cancer, cardiovascular disease, gastrointestinal dysfunctions, and COVID-19 infection. The recent information in this report will particularly furnish a platform for emerging novel probiotics-based therapeutics as cheap and safe, encouraging researchers and stakeholders to develop innovative treatments based on probiotics to prevent and treat chronic and viral diseases.


Subject(s)
Chronic Disease/therapy , Probiotics/administration & dosage , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Fatty Acids, Volatile/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Immune System/metabolism , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/therapy , Virus Diseases/immunology , Virus Diseases/metabolism , Virus Diseases/therapy
4.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(14): 3795-3817, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1459010

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2, the cause of the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, utilizes the mechanism of binding to ACE2 (a crucial component of the renin-angiotensin system [RAS]), subsequently mediating a secondary imbalance of the RAS family and leading to severe injury to the host. However, very few studies have been conducted to reveal the mechanism behind the effect of SARS-CoV-2 on tumors. Methods: Demographic data extracted from 33 cancer types and over 10,000 samples were employed to determine the comprehensive landscape of the RAS. Expression distribution, pretranscriptional and posttranscriptional regulation and posttranslational modifications (PTMs) as well as genomic alterations, DNA methylation and m6A modification were analyzed in both tissue and cell lines. The clinical phenotype, prognostic value and significance of the RAS during immune infiltration were identified. Results: Low expression of AGTR1 was common in tumors compared to normal tissues, while very low expression of AGTR2 and MAS1 was detected in both tissues and cell lines. Differential expression patterns of ACE in ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV) and kidney renal clear cell carcinoma (KIRC) were correlated with ubiquitin modification involving E3 ligases. Genomic alterations of the RAS family were infrequent across TCGA pan-cancer program, and ACE had the highest alteration frequency compared with other members. Low expression of AGTR1 may result from hypermethylation in the promoter. Downregulation of RAS family was linked to higher clinical stage and worse survival (as measured by disease-specific survival [DSS], overall survival [OS] or progression-free interval [PFI]), especially for ACE2 and AGTR1 in KIRC. ACE-AGTR1, a classical axis of the RAS family related to immune infiltration, was positively correlated with M2-type macrophages, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and immune checkpoint genes in most cancers. Conclusion: ACE, ACE2, AGT and AGTR1 were differentially expressed in 33 types of cancers. PTM of RAS family was found to rely on ubiquitination. ACE2 and AGTR1 might serve as independent prognostic factors for LGG and KIRC. SARS-CoV-2 might modify the tumor microenvironment by regulating the RAS family, thus affecting the biological processes of cancer.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms/metabolism , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , DNA Methylation , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Humans , Immunotherapy , Neoplasms/etiology , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/therapy , Protein Processing, Post-Translational
5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 19839, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454816

ABSTRACT

Computational drug repositioning aims at ranking and selecting existing drugs for novel diseases or novel use in old diseases. In silico drug screening has the potential for speeding up considerably the shortlisting of promising candidates in response to outbreaks of diseases such as COVID-19 for which no satisfactory cure has yet been found. We describe DrugMerge as a methodology for preclinical computational drug repositioning based on merging multiple drug rankings obtained with an ensemble of disease active subnetworks. DrugMerge uses differential transcriptomic data on drugs and diseases in the context of a large gene co-expression network. Experiments with four benchmark diseases demonstrate that our method detects in first position drugs in clinical use for the specified disease, in all four cases. Application of DrugMerge to COVID-19 found rankings with many drugs currently in clinical trials for COVID-19 in top positions, thus showing that DrugMerge can mimic human expert judgment.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning/methods , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Antiviral Agents , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Computational Biology/methods , Databases, Genetic , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
6.
Int J Biol Sci ; 17(14): 3954-3967, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449161

ABSTRACT

Furin is a proprotein convertase that activates different kinds of regulatory proteins, including SARS-CoV-2 spike protein which contains an additional furin-specific cleavage site. It is essential in predicting cancer patients' susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 and the disease outcomes due to varying furin expressions in tumor tissues. In this study, we analyzed furin's expression, methylation, mutation rate, functional enrichment, survival rate and COVID-19 outcomes in normal and cancer tissues using online databases, and our IHC. As a result, furin presented with biased expression profiles in normal tissues, showing 12.25-fold higher than ACE2 in the lungs. The furin expression in tumors were significantly increased in ESCA and TGCT, and decreased in DLBC and THYM, indicating furin may play critical mechanistic functions in COVID-19 viral entry into cells in these cancer patients. Line with furin over/downexpression, furin promoter hypo-/hyper-methylation may be the regulatory cause of disease and lead to pathogenesis of ESCA and THYM. Furthermore, presence of FURIN-201 isoform with functional domains (P_proprotein, Peptidase_S8 and S8_pro-domain) is highest in all cancer types in comparison to other isoforms, demonstrating its use in tumorigenesis and SARS-Cov-2 entry into tumor tissues. Furin mutation frequency was highest in UCES, and its mutation might elevate ACE2 expression in LUAD and UCEC, reduce ACE2 expression in COAD, elevate HSPA5 expression in PAAD, and elevate TMPRSS2 expression in BRCA. These results showed that furin mutations mostly increased expression of ACE2, HSPA5, and TMPRSS2 in certain cancers, indicating furin mutations might facilitate COVID-19 cell entry in cancer patients. In addition, high expression of furin was significantly inversely correlated with long overall survival (OS) in LGG and correlated with long OS in COAD and KIRC, indicating that it could be used as a favorable prognostic marker for cancer patients' survival. GO and KEGG demonstrated that furin was mostly enriched in genes for metabolic and biosynthetic processes, retinal dehydrogenase activity, tRNA methyltransferase activity, and genes involving COVID-19, further supporting its role in COVID-19 and cancer metabolism. Moreover, Cordycepin (CD) inhibited furin expression in a dosage dependent manner. Altogether, furin's high expression might not only implies increased susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 and higher severity of COVID-19 symptoms in cancer patients, but also it highlights the need for cancer treatment and therapy during the COVID-19 pandemic. CD might have a potential to develop an anti-SARS-CoV-2 drug through inhibiting furin expression.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/virology , Deoxyadenosines/therapeutic use , Furin/metabolism , Neoplasms/metabolism , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/complications , Cell Line, Tumor , Deoxyadenosines/pharmacology , Disease Susceptibility , Furin/antagonists & inhibitors , Furin/genetics , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Protein Isoforms/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism
7.
Cells ; 10(4)2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408630

ABSTRACT

Macrophages are widely distributed in tissues and function in homeostasis. During cancer development, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) dominatingly support disease progression and resistance to therapy by promoting tumor proliferation, angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunosuppression, thereby making TAMs a target for tumor immunotherapy. Here, we started with evidence that TAMs are highly plastic and heterogeneous in phenotype and function in response to microenvironmental cues. We pointed out that efforts to tear off the heterogeneous "camouflage" in TAMs conduce to target de facto protumoral TAMs efficiently. In particular, several fate-mapping models suggest that most tissue-resident macrophages (TRMs) are generated from embryonic progenitors, and new paradigms uncover the ontogeny of TAMs. First, TAMs from embryonic modeling of TRMs and circulating monocytes have distinct transcriptional profiling and function, suggesting that the ontogeny of TAMs is responsible for the functional heterogeneity of TAMs, in addition to microenvironmental cues. Second, metabolic remodeling helps determine the mechanism of phenotypic and functional characteristics in TAMs, including metabolic bias from macrophages' ontogeny in macrophages' functional plasticity under physiological and pathological conditions. Both models aim at dissecting the ontogeny-related metabolic regulation in the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity in TAMs. We argue that gleaning from the single-cell transcriptomics on subclonal TAMs' origins may help understand the classification of TAMs' population in subclonal evolution and their distinct roles in tumor development. We envision that TAM-subclone-specific metabolic reprogramming may round-up with future cancer therapies.


Subject(s)
Embryo, Mammalian/pathology , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/prevention & control , Tumor-Associated Macrophages/pathology , Glucose/metabolism , Humans , Lipid Metabolism , Neoplasms/metabolism , Single-Cell Analysis
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(3)2021 Jan 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389387

ABSTRACT

In this review, we discuss the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA), which is the master regulator of MHC class II gene expression. CIITA is the founding member of the mammalian nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) protein family but stood apart for a long time as the only transcriptional regulator. More recently, it was found that its closest homolog, NLRC5 (NLR protein caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD)-containing 5), is a regulator of MHC-I gene expression. Both act as non-DNA-binding activators through multiple protein-protein interactions with an MHC enhanceosome complex that binds cooperatively to a highly conserved combinatorial cis-acting module. Thus, the regulation of MHC-II expression is regulated largely through the differential expression of CIITA. In addition to the well-defined role of CIITA in MHC-II GENE regulation, we will discuss several other aspects of CIITA functions, such as its role in cancer, its role as a viral restriction element contributing to intrinsic immunity, and lastly, its very recently discovered role as an inhibitor of Ebola and SARS-Cov-2 virus replication. We will briefly touch upon the recently discovered role of NLRP3 as a transcriptional regulator, which suggests that transcriptional regulation is, after all, not such an unusual feature for NLR proteins.


Subject(s)
Genes, MHC Class II , NLR Proteins/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Trans-Activators/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Ebolavirus/physiology , Gene Expression Regulation , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/genetics , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/metabolism , Humans , NLR Proteins/genetics , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Protein Interaction Maps , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Trans-Activators/genetics , Virus Replication
9.
Ann Nucl Med ; 35(11): 1264-1269, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378991

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are known to provide an immune response seen on FDG PET studies. However, the time course of this metabolic response is unknown. We here present a temporal metabolic response to mRNA COVID-19 vaccination in oncology patients undergoing standard of care FDG PET. METHODS: 262 oncology patients undergoing standard of care FDG PET were included in the analysis. 231 patients had at least one dose of mRNA COVID-19 vaccine while 31 patients had not been vaccinated. The SUVmax of the lymph nodes ipsilateral to the vaccination was compared to the contralateral to obtain an absolute change in SUVmax (ΔSUVmax). RESULTS: ΔSUVmax was more significant at shorter times between FDG PET imaging and COVID-19 mRNA vaccination, with a median ΔSUVmax of 2.6 (0-7 days), 0.8 (8-14 days), and 0.3 (> 14 days), respectively. CONCLUSION: Consideration should be given to performing FDG PET at least 2 weeks after the COVID-19 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/metabolism , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Axilla , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/metabolism , Humans , Lymph Nodes/diagnostic imaging , Lymph Nodes/immunology , Lymph Nodes/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Pectoralis Muscles , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Time Factors , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage
10.
IUBMB Life ; 73(10): 1198-1204, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366237

ABSTRACT

Mechanisms discovered to drive increased glucose metabolism in cancer cells are found to be similar to those in viral-infected cells. In this mini review, we summarize the major pathways by which the sugar analog, 2-Deoxy-d-glucose, has been shown to exploit increased glucose metabolism in cancer and how this information applies to viral-infected cells. Moreover, we highlight the relevance of these findings to the emergency approval of 2-Deoxy-d-glucose in India to be used against SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Deoxyglucose/pharmacology , Glucose/metabolism , Neoplasms/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , COVID-19/virology , Humans , India , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
11.
FEBS Lett ; 595(18): 2350-2365, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363632

ABSTRACT

Cancer is considered a high-risk condition for severe illness resulting from COVID-19. The interaction between severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and human metabolism is key to elucidating the risk posed by COVID-19 for cancer patients and identifying effective treatments, yet it is largely uncharacterised on a mechanistic level. We present a genome-scale map of short-term metabolic alterations triggered by SARS-CoV-2 infection of cancer cells. Through transcriptomic- and proteomic-informed genome-scale metabolic modelling, we characterise the role of RNA and fatty acid biosynthesis in conjunction with a rewiring in energy production pathways and enhanced cytokine secretion. These findings link together complementary aspects of viral invasion of cancer cells, while providing mechanistic insights that can inform the development of treatment strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Glycolysis , Models, Biological , Neoplasms/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , Cell Line, Tumor , Genome, Human , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Proteomics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346497

ABSTRACT

Platelets are hematopoietic cells whose main function has for a long time been considered to be the maintenance of vascular integrity. They have an essential role in the hemostatic response, but they also have functional capabilities that go far beyond it. This review will provide an overview of platelet functions. Indeed, stress signals may induce platelet apoptosis through proapoptotis or hemostasis receptors, necrosis, and even autophagy. Platelets also interact with immune cells and modulate immune responses in terms of activation, maturation, recruitment and cytokine secretion. This review will also show that platelets, thanks to their wide range of innate immune receptors, and in particular toll-like receptors, and can be considered sentinels actively participating in the immuno-surveillance of the body. We will discuss the diversity of platelet responses following the engagement of these receptors as well as the signaling pathways involved. Finally, we will show that while platelets contribute significantly, via their TLRs, to immune response and inflammation, these receptors also participate in the pathophysiological processes associated with various pathogens and diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis.


Subject(s)
Atherosclerosis/pathology , Blood Platelets/pathology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Neoplasms/pathology , Platelet Activation , Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism , Animals , Atherosclerosis/immunology , Atherosclerosis/metabolism , Blood Platelets/immunology , Blood Platelets/metabolism , Humans , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/metabolism
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346495

ABSTRACT

Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles secreted by most cells that contain a variety of biological molecules, such as lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. They have been recognized as important mediators for long-distance cell-to-cell communication and are involved in a variety of biological processes. Exosomes have unique advantages, positioning them as highly effective drug delivery tools and providing a distinct means of delivering various therapeutic agents to target cells. In addition, as a new clinical diagnostic biomarker, exosomes play an important role in many aspects of human health and disease, including endocrinology, inflammation, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we summarize the development of exosome-based drug delivery tools and the validation of novel biomarkers, and illustrate the role of exosomes as therapeutic targets in the prevention and treatment of various diseases.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Drug Delivery Systems , Exosomes/metabolism , Inflammation/prevention & control , Neoplasms/prevention & control , Pharmaceutical Preparations/administration & dosage , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/metabolism , Neoplasms/metabolism
14.
Int J Rheum Dis ; 24(10): 1317-1320, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341230

ABSTRACT

Interleukin (IL)-6 is a soluble factor secreted by T lymphocytes, involved in antibody generation by B lymphocytes. The IL-6 pathway has risen as a pivotal pathway implicated in immune regulation and dysregulation in various rheumatic diseases. Nonetheless, elevated IL-6 levels can also play a role in cancer. Targeting the IL-6 pathway has led to innovative therapeutic approaches for rheumatic diseases and for COVID-19, particularly in the elderly. Indeed, tocilizumab, an agent targeting IL-6, has recently amassed significant attention as a promising univocal agent for different conditions. In this viewpoint, we sought to recall and describe the common pathway among osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer, suggesting that anti-IL-6 may be considered a jack-of-all-trades against inflammaging in the elderly.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Immunity, Cellular , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Neoplasms/metabolism , Rheumatic Diseases/metabolism , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Neoplasms/immunology , Rheumatic Diseases/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325685

ABSTRACT

Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a well-known transcription factor best recognised as one of the main regulators of the oxidative stress response. Beyond playing a crucial role in cell defence by transactivating cytoprotective genes encoding antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes, Nrf2 is also implicated in a wide network regulating anti-inflammatory response and metabolic reprogramming. Such a broad spectrum of actions renders the factor a key regulator of cell fate and a strategic player in the control of cell transformation and response to viral infections. The Nrf2 protective roles in normal cells account for its anti-tumour and anti-viral functions. However, Nrf2 overstimulation often occurs in tumour cells and a complex correlation of Nrf2 with cancer initiation and progression has been widely described. Therefore, if on one hand, Nrf2 has a dual role in cancer, on the other hand, the factor seems to display a univocal function in preventing inflammation and cytokine storm that occur under viral infections, specifically in coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19). In such a variegate context, the present review aims to dissect the roles of Nrf2 in both cancer and COVID-19, two widespread diseases that represent a cause of major concern today. In particular, the review describes the molecular aspects of Nrf2 signalling in both pathological situations and the most recent findings about the advantages of Nrf2 inhibition or activation as possible strategies for cancer and COVID-19 treatment respectively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , Neoplasms/metabolism , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/metabolism , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/chemistry , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Signal Transduction
16.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(7)2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299439

ABSTRACT

The endocannabinoid system (ECS) employs a huge network of molecules (receptors, ligands, and enzymatic machinery molecules) whose interactions with other cellular networks have still not been fully elucidated. Endogenous cannabinoids are molecules with the primary function of control of multiple metabolic pathways. Maintenance of tissue and cellular homeostasis by functional fine-tuning of essential metabolic pathways is one of the key characteristics of the ECS. It is implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological states and an attractive pharmacological target yet to reach its full potential. This review will focus on the involvement of ECS in glucose and lipid metabolism, food intake regulation, immune homeostasis, respiratory health, inflammation, cancer and other physiological and pathological states will be substantiated using freely available data from open-access databases, experimental data and literature review. Future directions should envision capturing its diversity and exploiting pharmacological options beyond the classical ECS suspects (exogenous cannabinoids and cannabinoid receptor monomers) as signaling through cannabinoid receptor heteromers offers new possibilities for different biochemical outcomes in the cell.


Subject(s)
Endocannabinoids/metabolism , Metabolic Networks and Pathways , Receptors, Cannabinoid/metabolism , Animals , Appetite Regulation , Carbohydrate Metabolism , Endocannabinoids/immunology , Humans , Lipid Metabolism , Neoplasms/etiology , Neoplasms/metabolism , Respiration Disorders/immunology , Respiration Disorders/metabolism
17.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(7)2021 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1299438

ABSTRACT

Cancer "stem cells" (CSCs) sustain the hierarchies of dividing cells that characterize cancer. The main causes of cancer-related mortality are metastatic disease and relapse, both of which originate primarily from CSCs, so their eradication may provide a bona fide curative strategy, though there maybe also the need to kill the bulk cancer cells. While classic anti-cancer chemotherapy is effective against the dividing progeny of CSCs, non-dividing or quiescent CSCs are often spared. Improved anti-cancer therapies therefore require approaches that target non-dividing CSCs, which must be underpinned by a better understanding of factors that permit these cells to maintain a stem cell-like state. During hematopoiesis, retinoic acid receptor (RAR) γ is selectively expressed by stem cells and their immediate progeny. It is overexpressed in, and is an oncogene for, many cancers including colorectal, renal and hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinomas and some cases of acute myeloid leukemia that harbor RARγ fusion proteins. In vitro studies suggest that RARγ-selective and pan-RAR antagonists provoke the death of CSCs by necroptosis and point to antagonism of RARγ as a potential strategy to treat metastatic disease and relapse, and perhaps provide a cure for some cancers.


Subject(s)
Neoplastic Stem Cells/metabolism , Receptors, Retinoic Acid/genetics , Receptors, Retinoic Acid/metabolism , Cell Division/physiology , Humans , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplastic Stem Cells/physiology , Oncogenes/genetics , Receptors, Retinoic Acid/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Retinoic Acid/physiology
18.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 141: 111888, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293595

ABSTRACT

Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa L., is a fat-soluble natural compound that can be obtained from ginger plant tuber roots, which accumulative evidences have demonstrated that it can resist viral and microbial infection and has anti-tumor, reduction of blood lipid and blood glucose, antioxidant and removal of free radicals, and is active against numerous disorders various chronic diseases including cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological and autoimmune diseases. In this article is highlighted the recent evidence of curcuminoids applied in sevral aspects of medical problem particular in COVID-19 pandemics. We have searched several literature databases including MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, the Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, and the ClinicalTrials.gov website via using curcumin and medicinal properties as a keyword. All studies published from the time when the database was established to May 2021 was retrieved. This review article summarizes the growing confirmation for the mechanisms related to curcumin's physiological and pharmacological effects with related target proteins interaction via molecular docking. The purpose is to provide deeper insight and understandings of curcumin's medicinal value in the discovery and development of new drugs. Curcumin could be used in the prevention or therapy of cardiovascular disease, respiratory diseases, cancer, neurodegeneration, infection, and inflammation based on cellular biochemical, physiological regulation, infection suppression and immunomodulation.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Curcumin/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents/metabolism , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/metabolism , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Autoimmune Diseases/drug therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/metabolism , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Curcumin/metabolism , Curcumin/pharmacology , Humans , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/metabolism , Protein Structure, Secondary
19.
Nutrients ; 13(5)2021 May 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234784

ABSTRACT

This review answers the question of why selenium is such an important trace element in the human diet. Daily dietary intake of selenium and its content in various food products is discussed in this paper, as well as the effects of its deficiency and excess in the body. Moreover, the biological activity of selenium, which it performs mainly through selenoproteins, is discussed. These specific proteins are responsible for thyroid hormone management, fertility, the aging process, and immunity, but their key role is to maintain a redox balance in cells. Furthermore, taking into account world news and the current SARS-CoV-2 virus pandemic, the impact of selenium on the course of COVID-19 is also discussed. Another worldwide problem is the number of new cancer cases and cancer-related mortality. Thus, the last part of the article discusses the impact of selenium on cancer risk based on clinical trials (including NPC and SELECT), systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Additionally, this review discusses the possible mechanisms of selenium action that prevent cancer development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Diet , Neoplasms , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Selenium/therapeutic use , Trace Elements/therapeutic use , Humans , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/metabolism
20.
J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem ; 36(1): 1016-1028, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226495

ABSTRACT

Elastase is a proteolytic enzyme belonging to the family of hydrolases produced by human neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and endothelial cells. Human neutrophil elastase is known to play multiple roles in the human body, but an increase in its activity may cause a variety of diseases. Elastase inhibitors may prevent the development of psoriasis, chronic kidney disease, respiratory disorders (including COVID-19), immune disorders, and even cancers. Among polyphenolic compounds, some flavonoids and their derivatives, which are mostly found in herbal plants, have been revealed to influence elastase release and its action on human cells. This review focuses on elastase inhibitors that have been discovered from natural sources and are biochemically characterised as flavonoids. The inhibitory activity on elastase is a characteristic of flavonoid aglycones and their glycoside and methylated, acetylated and hydroxylated derivatives. The presented analysis of structure-activity relationship (SAR) enables the determination of the chemical groups responsible for evoking an inhibitory effect on elastase. Further study especially of the in vivo efficacy and safety of the described natural compounds is of interest in order to gain better understanding of their health-promoting potential.


Subject(s)
Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Flavonoids/pharmacology , Leukocyte Elastase/antagonists & inhibitors , Neutrophils/enzymology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry , Flavonoids/chemistry , Humans , Leukocyte Elastase/metabolism , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neutrophils/drug effects , Structure-Activity Relationship
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