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1.
Zhonghua Zhong Liu Za Zhi ; 42(4): 305-311, 2020 Apr 23.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2033195

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the principles of differential diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in cancer patients during the outbreak of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) by analyzing one case of lymphoma who presented pulmonary ground-glass opacities (GGO) after courses of chemotherapy. Methods: Baseline demographics and clinicopathological data of eligible patients were retrieved from medical records. Information of clinical manifestations, history of epidemiology, lab tests and chest CT scan images of visiting patients from February 13 to February 28 were collected. Literatures about pulmonary infiltrates in cancer patients were searched from databases including PUBMED, EMBASE and CNKI. Results: Among the 139 cancer patients who underwent chest CT scans before chemotherapy, pulmonary infiltrates were identified in eight patients (5.8%), five of whom were characterized with GGOs in lungs. 2019-nCoV nuclear acid testing was performed in three patients and the results were negative. One case was a 66-year-old man who was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and underwent CHOP chemotherapy regimen. His chest CT scan image displayed multiple GGOs in lungs and the complete blood count showed decreased lymphocytes. This patient denied any contact with confirmed/suspected cases of 2019-nCoV infection, fever or other respiratory symptoms. Considering the negative result of nuclear acid testing, this patient was presumptively diagnosed with viral pneumonia and an experiential anti-infection treatment had been prescribed for him. Conclusions: The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) complicates the clinical scenario of pulmonary infiltrates in cancer patients. The epidemic history, clinical manifestation, CT scan image and lab test should be taken into combined consideration. The 2019-nCoV nuclear acid testing might be applied in more selected patients. Active anti-infection treatment and surveillance of patient condition should be initiated if infectious disease is considered.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus , Lung Injury/chemically induced , Lung Injury/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Diagnosis, Differential , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Male , Neoplasms/pathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
3.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(13)2022 Jun 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934120

ABSTRACT

The major object of this Editorial is to briefly put into context the processes, occurring during tumor onset and progression, and the biological mechanisms mediated by cadherins described in the review and research articles included in the Special Issue entitled "Activations of Cadherin Signaling in Cancer" [...].


Subject(s)
Cadherins , Neoplasms , Humans , Neoplasms/pathology , Signal Transduction
4.
Molecules ; 27(14)2022 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917640

ABSTRACT

Different pathological conditions, including viral infections and cancer, can have a massive impact on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing severe damage to the cell and exacerbating the disease. In particular, coronavirus infections, including SARS coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), responsible for COVID-19, cause ER stress as a consequence of the enormous amounts of viral glycoproteins synthesized, the perturbation of ER homeostasis and the modification of ER membranes. Therefore, ER has a central role in the viral life cycle, thus representing one of the Achilles' heels on which to focus therapeutic intervention. On the other hand, prolonged ER stress has been demonstrated to promote many pro-tumoral attributes in cancer cells, having a key role in tumor growth, metastasis and response to therapies. In this report, adopting a repurposing approach of approved drugs, we identified the antiplatelet agent ticlopidine as an interferent of the unfolded protein response (UPR) via sigma receptors (SRs) modulation. The promising results obtained suggest the potential use of ticlopidine to counteract ER stress induced by viral infections, such as COVID-19, and cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress , Humans , Neoplasms/pathology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/pharmacology , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Ticlopidine/pharmacology , Unfolded Protein Response
5.
Cell ; 185(14): 2452-2468.e16, 2022 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1885669

ABSTRACT

COVID survivors frequently experience lingering neurological symptoms that resemble cancer-therapy-related cognitive impairment, a syndrome for which white matter microglial reactivity and consequent neural dysregulation is central. Here, we explored the neurobiological effects of respiratory SARS-CoV-2 infection and found white-matter-selective microglial reactivity in mice and humans. Following mild respiratory COVID in mice, persistently impaired hippocampal neurogenesis, decreased oligodendrocytes, and myelin loss were evident together with elevated CSF cytokines/chemokines including CCL11. Systemic CCL11 administration specifically caused hippocampal microglial reactivity and impaired neurogenesis. Concordantly, humans with lasting cognitive symptoms post-COVID exhibit elevated CCL11 levels. Compared with SARS-CoV-2, mild respiratory influenza in mice caused similar patterns of white-matter-selective microglial reactivity, oligodendrocyte loss, impaired neurogenesis, and elevated CCL11 at early time points, but after influenza, only elevated CCL11 and hippocampal pathology persisted. These findings illustrate similar neuropathophysiology after cancer therapy and respiratory SARS-CoV-2 infection which may contribute to cognitive impairment following even mild COVID.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Neoplasms , Animals , Humans , Influenza, Human/pathology , Mice , Microglia/pathology , Myelin Sheath , Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Microb Drug Resist ; 28(5): 601-610, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1864944

ABSTRACT

This retrospective study aims to describe the etiology and resistance patterns of pathogens causing bacteremia in children with solid tumors in a tertiary pediatric hematology-oncology center in Jerusalem, Israel (2011-2019). Factors associated with multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteremia and mortality were analyzed. A total of 228 pathogens were isolated in 126 patients; 61.0% were gram-negative rods (GNR) and 38.2% were gram-positive cocci (GPC). The most common pathogens were Klebsiella pneumoniae (19.3%), Escherichia coli (17.5%), and coagulase-negative staphylococci (16.2%). The proportion of MDR-GNR was 18.2%, while the proportion of MDR-GPC was 55.2%. In logistic regression analysis, breakthrough bacteremia on a penicillin-group antibiotic (odds ratio [OR] 5.69, [95% confidence interval 1.42-22.76], p-value = 0.014) was associated and underlying diagnosis of neuroblastoma was inversely associated (OR 0.17, [0.04-0.81], p-value = 0.026) with MDR-GNR bacteremia; while the previous hospitalizations' duration (OR 1.032/day, [1.01-1.06], p-value = 0.007) and oncologic treatment intensity (OR 2.19, [1.08-4.45, p-value = 0.03) were associated with MDR-GPC bacteremia. Shock, prolonged profound neutropenia, and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission were associated with 7-day mortality; and relapsed disease, oncologic treatment intensity, prolonged profound neutropenia, and PICU admission-with 30-day mortality in the univariate analyses. Empirical antibiotic choice should be based on factors associated with MDR infections in this specific population.


Subject(s)
Bacteremia , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections , Neoplasms , Neutropenia , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacteremia/drug therapy , Bacteremia/epidemiology , Child , Drug Resistance, Multiple , Escherichia coli , Gram-Negative Bacteria , Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/pathology , Neutropenia/complications , Neutropenia/drug therapy , Retrospective Studies
8.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 50(D1): D27-D38, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758797

ABSTRACT

The National Genomics Data Center (NGDC), part of the China National Center for Bioinformation (CNCB), provides a family of database resources to support global research in both academia and industry. With the explosively accumulated multi-omics data at ever-faster rates, CNCB-NGDC is constantly scaling up and updating its core database resources through big data archive, curation, integration and analysis. In the past year, efforts have been made to synthesize the growing data and knowledge, particularly in single-cell omics and precision medicine research, and a series of resources have been newly developed, updated and enhanced. Moreover, CNCB-NGDC has continued to daily update SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences, variants, haplotypes and literature. Particularly, OpenLB, an open library of bioscience, has been established by providing easy and open access to a substantial number of abstract texts from PubMed, bioRxiv and medRxiv. In addition, Database Commons is significantly updated by cataloguing a full list of global databases, and BLAST tools are newly deployed to provide online sequence search services. All these resources along with their services are publicly accessible at https://ngdc.cncb.ac.cn.


Subject(s)
Databases, Factual , Animals , China , Computational Biology , Databases, Genetic , Databases, Pharmaceutical , Dogs , Epigenome , Genome, Human , Genome, Viral , Genomics , Humans , Methylation , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/pathology , Regeneration , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Single-Cell Analysis , Software , Synthetic Biology
9.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 3775, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735272

ABSTRACT

Loop-mediated isothermal amplification is known for its high sensitivity, specificity and tolerance to inhibiting-substances. In this work, we developed a device for performing real-time colorimetric LAMP combining the accuracy of lab-based quantitative analysis with the simplicity of point-of-care testing. The device innovation lies on the use of a plastic tube anchored vertically on a hot surface while the side walls are exposed to a mini camera able to take snapshots of the colour change in real time during LAMP amplification. Competitive features are the rapid analysis (< 30 min), quantification over 9 log-units, crude sample-compatibility (saliva, tissue, swabs), low detection limit (< 5 copies/reaction), smartphone-operation, fast prototyping (3D-printing) and ability to select the dye of interest (Phenol red, HNB). The device's clinical utility is demonstrated in cancer mutations-analysis during the detection of 0.01% of BRAF-V600E-to-wild-type molecules from tissue samples and COVID-19 testing with 97% (Ct < 36.8) and 98% (Ct < 30) sensitivity when using extracted RNA and nasopharyngeal-swabs, respectively. The device high technology-readiness-level makes it a suitable platform for performing any colorimetric LAMP assay; moreover, its simple and inexpensive fabrication holds promise for fast deployment and application in global diagnostics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/instrumentation , Colorimetry , Humans , Limit of Detection , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques , Nasopharynx/virology , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/pathology , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques , Point-of-Care Testing , Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/genetics , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sensitivity and Specificity , Smartphone
10.
Int J Oncol ; 60(3)2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726130

ABSTRACT

Biobanks constitute an integral part of precision medicine. They provide a repository of biospecimens that may be used to elucidate the pathophysiology, support diagnoses, and guide the treatment of diseases. The pilot biobank of rare malignant neoplasms has been established in the context of the Hellenic Network of Precision Medicine on Cancer and aims to enhance future clinical and/or research studies in Greece by collecting, processing, and storing rare malignant neoplasm samples with associated data. The biobank currently comprises 553 samples; 384 samples of hematopoietic and lymphoid tissue malignancies, 72 samples of pediatric brain tumors and 97 samples of malignant skin neoplasms. In this article, sample collections and their individual significance in clinical research are described in detail along with computational methods developed specifically for this project. A concise review of the Greek biobanking landscape is also delineated, in addition to recommended technologies, methodologies and protocols that were integrated during the creation of the biobank. This project is expected to re­enforce current clinical and research studies, introduce advances in clinical and genetic research and potentially aid in future targeted drug discovery. It is our belief that the future of medical research is entwined with accessible, effective, and ethical biobanking and that our project will facilitate research planning in the '­omic' era by contributing high­quality samples along with their associated data.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks/trends , Neoplasms/pathology , Precision Medicine/trends , Cell Line, Tumor , Greece , Humans , Precision Medicine/methods
11.
Vet Comp Oncol ; 20(1): 198-206, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704562

ABSTRACT

Mandatory second opinion histopathology is common practice in human surgical pathology. It is intended to confirm the original diagnosis or identify clinically significant discrepancies, which could alter the course of disease, cost of treatment, patient management or prognosis. This retrospective analysis aimed to evaluate agreement between first and second opinion histopathology cases, examine their correlation with natural history of disease and investigate the rationale for pursuing this test. Medical records from 2011 to 2019 were reviewed, identifying 109 cases where second opinion histopathology was sought. Reasons for seeking second opinion and clinical disease course were also reviewed to determine whether case progression favoured first or second opinion findings in cases of diagnostic disagreement. Diagnostic disagreement was found in 49.5% of cases. Complete diagnostic disagreement (a change in degree of malignancy or tumour type) occurred in 15.6% cases and partial disagreement (a change in tumour subtype, grade, margins and mitotic count) occurred in 33.9%. Major disagreement (a change in diagnosis resulting in alteration of treatment recommendations) occurred in 38.5% of cases. The most common reasons for seeking second opinion were an atypical/poorly differentiated tumour (31.2%; 34/109) or a discordant clinical picture (24.8%; 27/109). Among cases with any form of disagreement, natural history of disease favoured second opinion findings in 33.3%. The first opinion was favoured over the second in a single case. These findings reinforce previous literature supporting a role for second opinion histopathology in optimizing therapy and predicting outcomes in veterinary oncology, particularly in cases where diagnosis is in question based on the overall clinical picture.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Referral and Consultation , Animals , Humans , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/veterinary , Retrospective Studies
12.
Nat Cell Biol ; 23(12): 1240-1254, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699219

ABSTRACT

Extracellular vesicles and exomere nanoparticles are under intense investigation as sources of clinically relevant cargo. Here we report the discovery of a distinct extracellular nanoparticle, termed supermere. Supermeres are morphologically distinct from exomeres and display a markedly greater uptake in vivo compared with small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. The protein and RNA composition of supermeres differs from small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. Supermeres are highly enriched with cargo involved in multiple cancers (glycolytic enzymes, TGFBI, miR-1246, MET, GPC1 and AGO2), Alzheimer's disease (APP) and cardiovascular disease (ACE2, ACE and PCSK9). The majority of extracellular RNA is associated with supermeres rather than small extracellular vesicles and exomeres. Cancer-derived supermeres increase lactate secretion, transfer cetuximab resistance and decrease hepatic lipids and glycogen in vivo. This study identifies a distinct functional nanoparticle replete with potential circulating biomarkers and therapeutic targets for a host of human diseases.


Subject(s)
Extracellular Vesicles/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Nanoparticles/metabolism , Alzheimer Disease/pathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Biological Transport/physiology , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Cell Communication/physiology , Cell Line, Tumor , HeLa Cells , Humans , Lactic Acid/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , Nanoparticles/classification , Neoplasms/pathology , Tumor Microenvironment
13.
J Med Chem ; 65(5): 3706-3728, 2022 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1699705

ABSTRACT

Glucose, the primary substrate for ATP synthesis, is catabolized during glycolysis to generate ATP and precursors for the synthesis of other vital biomolecules. Opportunistic viruses and cancer cells often hijack this metabolic machinery to obtain energy and components needed for their replication and proliferation. One way to halt such energy-dependent processes is by interfering with the glycolytic pathway. 2-Deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) is a synthetic glucose analogue that can inhibit key enzymes in the glycolytic pathway. The efficacy of 2-DG has been reported across an array of diseases and disorders, thereby demonstrating its broad therapeutic potential. Recent approval of 2-DG in India as a therapeutic approach for the management of the COVID-19 pandemic has brought renewed attention to this molecule. The purpose of this perspective is to present updated therapeutic avenues as well as a variety of chemical synthetic strategies for this medically useful sugar derivative, 2-DG.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Deoxyglucose/chemistry , Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Deoxyglucose/metabolism , Deoxyglucose/pharmacology , Deoxyglucose/therapeutic use , Epilepsy/diagnosis , Epilepsy/drug therapy , Epilepsy/pathology , Glycolysis/drug effects , Humans , Isotope Labeling , Mitochondria/metabolism , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/pathology , Positron-Emission Tomography , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Structure-Activity Relationship , Virus Replication/drug effects
14.
J Nucl Med ; 63(2): 274-279, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674255

ABSTRACT

Although the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can present as nonspecific clinical forms, subclinical cases represent an important route of transmission and a significant source of mortality, mainly in high-risk subpopulations such as cancer patients. A deeper knowledge of the metabolic shift in cells infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 could provide new insights about its pathogenic and host response and help to diagnose pulmonary involvement. We explored the potential added diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT scans in asymptomatic cancer patients with suspected COVID-19 pneumonia by investigating the association between metabolic and structural changes in the lung parenchyma. Methods: 18F-FDG PET/CT studies acquired between February 19 and May 29, 2020, were reviewed to identify those cancer patients with incidental findings suggestive of COVID-19 pneumonia. PET studies were interpreted through qualitative (visual) and semiquantitative (measurement of SUVmax) analysis evaluating lung findings. Several characteristic signs of COVID-19 pneumonia on CT were described as COVID-19 Reporting and Data System (CO-RADS) categories (1-6). After comparing the SUVmax of pulmonary infiltrates among different CO-RADS categories, we explored the best potential cutoffs for pulmonary SUVmax against CO-RADS categories as the gold standard result to eliminate the possibility that the diagnosis of COVID-19 pneumonia exists. Results: On multimodal PET/CT imaging, CT signs classified as CO-RADS category 5 or 6 were found in 16 of 41 (39%) oncologic patients. SUVmax was higher in patients with categories 5 and 6 than in patients with category 4 (6.17 ± 0.82 vs. 3.78 ± 0.50, P = 0.04) or categories 2 and 3 (3.59 ± 0.41, P = 0.01). A specificity of 93.8% (95% CI, 71.7%-99.7%) and an accuracy of 92.9% were obtained when combining a CO-RADS score of 5 or 6 with an SUVmax of 2.45 in pulmonary infiltrates. Conclusion: In asymptomatic cancer patients, the metabolic activity in lung infiltrates is closely associated with several combined tomographic changes characteristic of COVID-19 pneumonia. Multimodal 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging could provide additional information during early diagnosis in selected predisposed patients during the pandemic. The prognostic implications of simultaneous radiologic and molecular findings in cancer patients and other subpopulations at high risk for COVID-19 pneumonia deserve further evaluation in prospective research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/methods , Radiopharmaceuticals , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/metabolism , Neoplasms/pathology
15.
Cell Mol Life Sci ; 79(2): 94, 2022 Jan 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653404

ABSTRACT

Numerous post-translational modifications (PTMs) govern the collective metabolism of a cell through altering the structure and functions of proteins. The action of the most prevalent PTMs, encompassing phosphorylation, methylation, acylations, ubiquitination and glycosylation is well documented. A less explored protein PTM, conversion of peptidylarginine to citrulline, is the subject of this review. The process of citrullination is catalysed by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs), a family of conserved enzymes expressed in a variety of human tissues. Accumulating evidence suggest that citrullination plays a significant role in regulating cellular metabolism and gene expression by affecting a multitude of pathways and modulating the chromatin status. Here, we will discuss the biochemical nature of arginine citrullination, the enzymatic machinery behind it and also provide information on the pathological consequences of citrullination in the development of inflammatory diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus, periodontitis and COVID-19), cancer and thromboembolism. Finally, developments on inhibitors against protein citrullination and recent clinical trials providing a promising therapeutic approach to inflammatory disease by targeting citrullination are discussed.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/pathology , Citrullination/physiology , Inflammation/pathology , Protein Processing, Post-Translational/physiology , Protein-Arginine Deiminases/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Citrulline/biosynthesis , Energy Metabolism/physiology , Extracellular Traps/immunology , Gene Expression Regulation/genetics , Humans , Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Thromboembolism/pathology
16.
Pharm Res ; 39(11): 2635-2671, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1619474

ABSTRACT

Exosomes are cell-derived components composed of proteins, lipid, genetic information, cytokines, and growth factors. They play a vital role in immune modulation, cell-cell communication, and response to inflammation. Immune modulation has downstream effects on the regeneration of damaged tissue, promoting survival and repair of damaged resident cells, and promoting the tumor microenvironment via growth factors, antigens, and signaling molecules. On top of carrying biological messengers like mRNAs, miRNAs, fragmented DNA, disease antigens, and proteins, exosomes modulate internal cell environments that promote downstream cell signaling pathways to facilitate different disease progression and induce anti-tumoral effects. In this review, we have summarized how vaccines modulate our immune response in the context of cancer and infectious diseases and the potential of exosomes as vaccine delivery vehicles. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies show that exosomes play a decisive role in processes like angiogenesis, prognosis, tumor growth metastasis, stromal cell activation, intercellular communication, maintaining cellular and systematic homeostasis, and antigen-specific T- and B cell responses. This critical review summarizes the advancement of exosome based vaccine development and delivery, and this comprehensive review can be used as a valuable reference for the broader delivery science community.


Subject(s)
Exosomes , Neoplasms , Humans , Exosomes/metabolism , Vaccine Development , Tumor Microenvironment , Neoplasms/pathology , Cell Communication
19.
Cancer Res ; 81(24): 6273-6280, 2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582873

ABSTRACT

Longitudinal studies of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine-induced immune responses in patients with cancer are needed to optimize clinical care. In a prospective cohort study of 366 (291 vaccinated) patients, we measured antibody levels [anti-spike (IgG-(S-RBD) and anti-nucleocapsid immunoglobulin] at three time points. Antibody level trajectories and frequency of breakthrough infections were evaluated by tumor type and timing of treatment relative to vaccination. IgG-(S-RBD) at peak response (median = 42 days after dose 2) was higher (P = 0.002) and remained higher after 4 to 6 months (P = 0.003) in patients receiving mRNA-1273 compared with BNT162b2. Patients with solid tumors attained higher peak levels (P = 0.001) and sustained levels after 4 to 6 months (P < 0.001) compared with those with hematologic malignancies. B-cell targeted treatment reduced peak (P = 0.001) and sustained antibody responses (P = 0.003). Solid tumor patients receiving immune checkpoint inhibitors before vaccination had lower sustained antibody levels than those who received treatment after vaccination (P = 0.043). Two (0.69%) vaccinated and one (1.9%) unvaccinated patient had severe COVID-19 illness during follow-up. Our study shows variation in sustained antibody responses across cancer populations receiving various therapeutic modalities, with important implications for vaccine booster timing and patient selection. SIGNIFICANCE: Long-term studies of immunogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in patients with cancer are needed to inform evidence-based guidelines for booster vaccinations and to tailor sequence and timing of vaccinations to elicit improved humoral responses.


Subject(s)
2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunity, Humoral , Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/standards , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunization Programs , Immunoglobulin G , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/pathology , Prospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors , Vaccination/methods
20.
Int Immunol ; 33(10): 541-545, 2021 09 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575598

ABSTRACT

The spatial organization of chromatin is known to be highly dynamic in response to environmental stress. However, it remains unknown how chromatin dynamics contributes to or modulates the pathogenesis of immune and infectious diseases. Influenza virus is a single-stranded RNA virus, and transcription and replication of the virus genome occur in the nucleus. Since viral infection is generally associated with virus-driven hijack of the host cellular machineries, influenza virus may utilize and/or affect the nuclear system. In this review article, we focus on recent studies showing that the three-dimensional structure of chromatin changes with influenza virus infection, which affects the pathology of infection. Also, we discuss studies showing the roles of epigenetics in influenza virus infection. Understanding how this affects immune responses may lead to novel strategies to combat immune and infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Chromatin/metabolism , Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/metabolism , Homeodomain Proteins/metabolism , Influenza A virus/immunology , Influenza, Human/pathology , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Chromosomal Proteins, Non-Histone/metabolism , Histone Code/physiology , Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Neoplasms/pathology , Protein Structure, Tertiary , Severity of Illness Index , Virus Replication/physiology
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