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1.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 26(2): 165-175, 2022 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1765479

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Family caregivers provide complex care for patients with cancer, including management of multiple symptoms associated with the disease and its treatment. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this pilot project was to develop and conduct feasibility testing of a family caregiver educational intervention for symptom management. METHODS: The intervention was conducted with 23 family caregivers of patients with lung or gynecologic cancer to evaluate feasibility testing and assessment of caregiver preparedness, quality of life, and psychological distress at baseline and three and seven weeks postintervention. FINDINGS: Family caregivers were very interested in education related to their role in symptom management, with management of constipation, dyspnea, and diarrhea as the highest priorities. The intervention was feasible and valuable in assisting family caregivers in assessing symptoms and making decisions regarding treatment choices.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Neoplasms , Caregivers/psychology , Female , Humans , Neoplasms/psychology , Palliative Care , Pilot Projects , Quality of Life
2.
Curr Oncol Rep ; 24(3): 295-302, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1729402

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This study aims to describe what is currently known about how children with cancer have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, including morbidity and mortality, interruptions in cancer care and delays in diagnosis, and psychosocial effects. Here we summarize the literature on how this patient population has fared during the pandemic, reviewing multiple smaller reports along with two large registries. RECENT FINDINGS: Although children with cancer generally have better outcomes with COVID-19 infection than adults with cancer, their risks of hospitalization, ICU admission, and death are greatly increased compared to the general pediatric population. There are socioeconomic and ethnic disparities present in these effects. Children with cancer experience significant risks from the COVID-19 pandemic. It has yet to be seen how delays and interruptions of cancer treatment and direct organ toxicities caused by the virus itself may affect long-term outcomes in these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Family/psychology , Health Status Disparities , Humans , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
3.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 2021, 2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671637

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic poses a psychological challenge, especially for individuals with chronic illnesses. The aim of this study was to investigate associations of cancer with distress, including its interplay with further risk and protective factors. We conducted a representative survey of the German population (N = 2503, including N = 144 with a cancer diagnosis) during the first wave of the pandemic. In multiple linear and logistic regression analyses, we tested associations of cancer with depression and anxiety symptoms and suicidal ideation. We also investigated moderating effects of age, gender, income, living situation, marital status, and loneliness. Individuals with cancer were more likely to report anxiety symptoms (φ = .061), suicidal ideation (φ = .050), and loneliness (φ = .044) than other participants. In regression analyses that controlled for sociodemographic differences, cancer was still associated with anxiety symptoms. We also observed interaction effects, indicating that this relation was especially strong in men with cancer and that cancer survivors with a low income were particularly likely to report anxiety symptoms. The findings demonstrate that cancer survivors are a vulnerable group and that factors of different life domains interact in shaping well-being in the population, necessitating comprehensive risk assessment and support offers during the pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Self Report , Suicidal Ideation
4.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 69(4): e29535, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1664432

ABSTRACT

We compared psychosocial functioning of children with cancer and their caregivers in several phases of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to before COVID-19. One or more questionnaires on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) or fatigue of children or distress of their caregivers was available from 1644 families. In children with cancer, HRQoL was stable throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Fatigue was slightly lower and sleep somewhat better during the pandemic than before. Caregiver distress was lower in the first pandemic phase, but increased to pre-COVID-19 levels in later phases, indicating that the length and consequences of the pandemic may be weighing on them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers , Neoplasms , Pandemics , Caregivers/psychology , Child , Fatigue , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/psychology , Netherlands , Psychological Distress , Quality of Life
5.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(5): 4139-4147, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649707

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Our study's purpose was to investigate the viewpoints of cancer patients who had not yet been vaccinated. Cancer patients usually cannot get every vaccine because their immunity is low. For this reason, we aimed to detect their anxiety and curiosity for new vaccines for a new disease. METHODS: The goal of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to investigate cancer patients' perceptions of COVID vaccination. Over 18 years of age who have not yet been vaccinated for COVID-19 and who agreed to participate were included in the study. We applied three questionnaires between May and June 2021, one of them was prepared by us; the other two questionnaires were The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) form and Anxiety Sensitivity index to a total of 497 participants. Chi-square, Spearmen correlation test, and multivariable multinomial logistic regression tests were used when comparing. RESULTS: Our participants' ages were between 21 and 88, with a mean age of 61.38 (SD = 11.68), 48.6% (n = 251) of the participants were female. We discovered that 79.1% (n = 408) of respondents were not afraid of getting the COVID-19 vaccine. 27.7% (n = 143) of these patients were concerned about the COVID-19 vaccine's adverse effects, and 24.2% (n = 125) were afraid of its side effects with their treatments. 91.1% (n = 470) of the patients did not know which vaccine they would have and the type of the vaccine. Since the anxiety level is generally higher in women, anxiety scores were also higher in cancers seen in women, such as breast and ovarian cancer. Of course, in parallel with this, anxiety scores were lower in prostate cancers. Special patient groups should not be neglected during this vaccine season, and their concerns should be addressed. When a new vaccine is found, it can have long-term effects, which should not be ignored.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
6.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(4): 3303-3311, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607277

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID pandemic has greatly impacted cancer care, with survivorship care being accorded low priority. We aimed to assess the impact of the COVID pandemic on survivorship services at our centre, as well as on survivors of childhood cancer (CCS). METHODS: We analyzed the trends in survivorship care at our centre from March 2020 to June 2021 compared to previous years. We also conducted an online survey of adolescent and young adult (AYA-CCS) following up at the After Completion of Treatment Clinic, Mumbai, to assess the impact of the COVID pandemic and ensuing restrictions on our cohort of survivors. Sibling responses were used as comparator (CTRI/2020/11/029029). RESULTS: There was a decrease in in-person follow-ups and increase in remote follow-ups over the first few months of the pandemic. While in-person visits steadily increased after October 2020 and reached pre-pandemic numbers, distant follow-ups continue to be higher than pre-pandemic. Evaluable responses from the survey of 88 AYA-CCS and 25 siblings revealed new-onset health concerns in 29.5% of AYA-CCS, missed follow-up visit in 52% and varying degrees of mental health issues in 12.5%. While most survivors were able to cope with the stresses of the pandemic, 20% of siblings reported being unable to cope. CONCLUSIONS: Survivorship services continue to be affected well into the pandemic, with increased use of distant follow-ups. While AYA-CCS experienced significant physical, mental health issues and psychosocial concerns as a result of the COVID pandemic, they coped better than siblings during this stressful time, possibly due to multiple, holistic support systems including family, peer support groups and healthcare team.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Adolescent , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Child , Humans , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Survivors , Survivorship , Young Adult
7.
Cancer Med ; 10(24): 8854-8865, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540061

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given the high risk of COVID-19 mortality, patients with cancer may be vulnerable to fear of COVID-19, adverse psychological outcomes, and health care delays. METHODS: This longitudinal study surveyed the pandemic's impact on patients with cancer (N= 1529) receiving Patient Advocate Foundation services during early and later pandemic. Generalized estimating equation with repeated measures was conducted to assess the effect of COVID-19 on psychological distress. Logistic regression with repeated measures was used to assess the effect of COVID-19 on any delays in accessing health care (e.g., specialty care doctors, laboratory, or diagnostic testing, etc.). RESULTS: Among 1199 respondents, 94% considered themselves high risk for COVID-19. Respondents with more fear of COVID-19 had a higher mean psychological distress score (10.21; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 9.38-11.03) compared to respondents with less fear (7.55; 95% CI 6.75-8.36). Additionally, 47% reported delaying care. Respondents with more fear of COVID-19 had higher percentages of delayed care than those with less (56; 95% CI 39%-72% vs. 44%; 95% CI 28%-61%). These relationships persisted throughout the pandemic. For respondents with a COVID-19 diagnosis in their household (n = 116), distress scores were similar despite higher delays in care (58% vs. 27%) than those without COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Fear of COVID-19 is linked to psychological distress and delays in care among patients with cancer. Furthermore, those who are personally impacted see exacerbated cancer care delays. Timely psychosocial support and health care coordination are critical to meet increased care needs of patients with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Fear , Neoplasms/psychology , Psychological Distress , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Young Adult
8.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e932788, 2021 Nov 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497920

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The pandemic of Coronavirus infectious disease 2019 (COVID-19) poses a major public health challenge, and an effective vaccine is the potential mechanism to resolve this specific situation. The present study aimed to evaluate acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination among patients attending the Oncology Clinic of University Clinical Hospital Mostar. MATERIAL AND METHODS This cross-sectional observational study enrolled 364 patients with cancer from the Oncology Clinic of University Clinical Hospital Mostar during February 2021. Data were collected using a questionnaire that captured general information about the participants and their attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination. RESULTS Of the participants, 41.8% answered "Yes" when asked if they would take the vaccine once it becomes available, 37.6% answered "Not sure", and 20.6% answered "No". For patients in favor of vaccination, the main reasons reported were fear of getting sick (77.6%), the desire to contribute to herd immunity (57.8%), and trusting the recommendations of health professionals (57.2%). The main reasons for the patients' vaccination -refusal/indecision were doubts about the results from clinical trials of COVID-19 vaccines (49.1%), concerns about adverse effects (24.5%), and confusion about the various vaccine options (19.8%). The majority of participants (82.4%) stated that recommendation by their oncologist could influence their decision about vaccination. Of the participants who indicated unwillingness (refusal or indecision) to be vaccinated against COVID-19, 65.3% stated that recommendation by their oncologist could influence their decision about vaccination. CONCLUSIONS The findings from the present study showed most patients had refused or were indecisive regarding immunization with COVID-19 vaccine. Increasing physician awareness of this situation may result in higher rates of vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Neoplasms/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Bosnia and Herzegovina , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Universities
9.
Am J Clin Oncol ; 44(11): 580-587, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406508

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic abruptly disrupted cancer care. The impact of these disruptions on patient experiences remain relatively understudied. The objective of this study was to assess patients' perspectives regarding the impact of COVID-19 on their experiences, including their cancer care, emotional and mental health, and social determinants of health, and to evaluate whether these outcomes differed by cancer stage. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a survey among adults with cancer across the United States from April 1, 2020 to August 26, 2020 using virtual snowball sampling strategy in collaboration with professional organizations, cancer care providers, and patient advocacy groups. We analyzed data using descriptive statistics, χ2 and t tests. RESULTS: Three hundred twelve people with cancer participated and represented 38 states. The majority were non-Hispanic White (n=183; 58.7%) and female (n=177; 56.7%) with median age of 57 years. Ninety-one percent spoke English at home, 70.1% had health insurance, and 67% had access to home internet. Breast cancer was the most common diagnosis (n=67; 21.5%). Most had Stage 4 disease (n=80; 25.6%). Forty-six percent (n=145) experienced a change in their care due to COVID-19. Sixty percent (n=187) reported feeling very or extremely concerned that the pandemic would affect their cancer and disproportionately experienced among those with advanced cancer stages compared with earlier stages (P<0.001). Fifty-two percent (n=162) reported impact of COVID-19 on 1 or more aspects of social determinants of health with disproportionate impact among those with advanced cancer stages compared with earlier stages. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 impacted the care and well-being of patients with cancer and this impact was more pronounced among people with advanced cancer stages. Future work should consider tailored interventions to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on patients with cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Telemedicine , Time-to-Treatment , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/therapy , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
10.
Future Oncol ; 17(35): 4871-4882, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394695

ABSTRACT

Objective: Our study goal was to evaluate the behavioral response and practices of cancer patients to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the Middle East and north Africa. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a validated anonymous 45-question survey administered via SurveyMonkey® to cancer patients in 13 centers in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco and Saudi Arabia. Results: During the study period (from 21 April to 30 May 2020), 3642 patients participated in the study. The majority of patients (84.81%) were worried about contracting the infection. The reported strict adherence to precautions included avoiding the following actions: hand-shaking (77.40%), hugging and kissing (82.89%), social gathering (90.09%), meeting friends (84.68%) and visiting markets (75.65%). In a multivariate analysis, patients with poor precautionary practices were about twice as likely to cancel their medical appointment or a treatment session. Conclusion: Improving cancer patients' knowledge of and adherence to precautionary measures is needed not just to reduce the risk of acquiring infection but also to minimize the interruption of their medical care.


Lay abstract COVID-19 poses a higher risk for patients with cancer than other patients; therefore, it is prudent that they adhere to precautionary measures to protect themselves from the infection. We conducted a study to evaluate the behaviors and practices of these patients in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the Middle, East and North Africa. We developed a survey of 45 questions that was distributed in 13 centers in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco and Saudi Arabia between 21 April and 30 May 2020. About 85% of the 3642 patients who participated in the study were worried about contracting the infection. A substantial percentage of them (10­30%) were not adhering to various precautions and social distancing rules. On the other hand, 16% of them canceled medical appointments and 12% canceled treatment sessions. Our study showed the need for better adherence of patients with cancer to the infection precautions and most importantly, the need to have a better compliance with their treatment plans, such as keeping their scheduled appointments, to avoid harms from treatment delays.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Morocco/epidemiology , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
11.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 68(11): e29324, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1380406

ABSTRACT

Childhood cancersurvivors may be differentially impacted by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). From April to June of 2020, we examined psychosocial/health concerns in 4148 adult survivors and 571 siblings. Although more survivors reported concerns about getting sick (p = .002) and needing hospitalization (p = .003) in general, survivors and siblings were comparably concerned about being infected with and the consequences of COVID-19. Cranial radiation was associated with social isolation (relative risk [RR] = 1.3, CI = 1.1-1.7), and central nervous system (CNS) tumors were associated with unemployment due to COVID-19 (RR = 1.7, CI = 1.2-2.2). Some survivors appear more vulnerable and may require more support to meet health care and vocational needs during COVID-19, though siblings also perceive substantial risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Neoplasms , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Siblings , Social Isolation , Unemployment
12.
BMJ Open ; 11(8): e048175, 2021 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376498

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic (caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus) on individuals with cancer has been profound. It has led to increased anxiety, distress and deconditioning due to reduced physical activity. We aim to investigate whether SafeFit, a multimodal intervention of physical activity, nutrition and psychological support delivered virtually by cancer exercise specialists (CES), can improve physical and emotional functionings during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A phase III non-randomised intervention trial, target recruitment of 1050 adults with suspected or confirmed diagnosis of cancer. All recruited participants will receive the multimodal intervention delivered by CES for 6 months. Sessions will be delivered 1-to-1 using telephone/video conferencing consultations. CES will work with each participant to devise a personalised programme of (1) physical activity, (2) basic dietary advice and (3) psychological support, all underpinned by behaviour change support. PRIMARY OUTCOME: Physical and emotional functioning as measured by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ-C30). SECONDARY OUTCOMES: overall quality of life measured by EORTC-QLQ-C30 and EQ-5D-5L, health economics, patient activation, self-efficacy to self-manage chronic disease, distress, impact of COVID-19 on emotional functioning, self-reported physical activity, functional capacity and nutrition. Adherence to the intervention will also be measured and a process evaluation conducted. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was obtained from the Health Research Authority (reference number 20/NW/0254). Results of this trial will be disseminated through publication of peer-reviewed articles, presentations at scientific conferences, and to the public and people with cancer in collaboration with our patient and public involvement representatives and partners. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04425616.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Adult , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Cancer ; 127(24): 4636-4645, 2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358060

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic may induce post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among patients with cancer, who also face adaptations to their treatment. The authors assessed the occurrence of PTSD symptoms, investigated pandemic-induced adjustments in medical oncology practice in patients with cancer, and explored risk factors for PTSD and the association between PTSD symptoms, insomnia, and quality of life (QoL). METHODS: This prospective French study was conducted in patients with solid/hematologic tumors who were receiving medical treatment in the day care departments of 2 cancer centers during the lockdown. Adjustments to medical oncology practice were collected from medical records. PTSD (measured using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised), insomnia (measured using the Insomnia Severity Index), QoL (measured using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General instrument), and cognitive complaints (measured using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Function instrument) were collected through validated questionnaires. RESULTS: Clinical data and questionnaires were available for 734 and 576 patients, respectively. The median patient age was 64 years, and 69% of patients were women. Twenty-one percent of patients had PTSD. Twenty-seven percent (95% CI, 23%-30%) had an adjustment in their medical oncology program, including adjournments (29%), treatment interruptions (16%), modified treatment plans (27%), or adapted monitoring (27%). Women and patients experiencing an adjustment in oncology practice had a higher odds of PTSD (odds ratio= 2.10 [95% CI, 1.07-4.14] and 1.65 [95% CI, 1.03-2.63]; P < .05). PTSD symptoms were correlated with worse scores for QoL, cognition, and insomnia. CONCLUSIONS: Twenty-one percent of patients with cancer experienced PTSD symptoms associated with poor QoL during the first COVID-19-induced lockdown. Medical oncology practice was adjusted in approximately one-quarter of patients and was associated with the occurrence of PTSD symptoms. Psychosocial support should be offered in cancer centers to promote emotional resilience and avoid PTSD symptoms in patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Day Care, Medical , Neoplasms , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Female , France , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Medical Oncology , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
14.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0256047, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352711

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Five months after COVID-19 first occurred and protective regulations were introduced, patients at three outpatient hematological/oncological centers in Bavaria who had received antiproliferative tumor therapy (n = 30) were questioned about the pandemic's impact. PATIENTS, MATERIALS AND METHODS: In recorded semi-structured telephone interviews, the patients answered questions about their quality of life, treatment procedures, their relationship with medical care staff and modern communication technologies. Each interview consisted of 28 questions. The average length of an interview was 30 minutes. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed by means of a qualitative content analysis according to Mayring. RESULTS: The COVID-19 pandemic adds to the burden of patients by decreasing their social contacts. They perceived the new isolation and protective measures in outpatient clinics as mostly positive and said its impact had been only slightly adverse. With the implemented safety measures, they feel adequately protected and looked after and want their antiproliferative therapy to be performed as scheduled. Talking to medical staff provides additional reassurance. CONCLUSION: Although the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the social isolation of tumor patients, it has had only a minor effect on tumor therapy in the surveyed patient population. The benefits of modern communication options to tumor patients remains uncertain and should be investigated further in future studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/psychology , Adult , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Neoplasms/pathology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Isolation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telephone
15.
J Hosp Palliat Nurs ; 23(4): 346-353, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343731

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically changed social life. This secondary qualitative analysis aimed to better understand the impact of the pandemic on bereaved hospice family caregivers' experiences of social connection and isolation in a time of social distancing and general anxiety. Six caregivers in 3 states recorded audio diaries (N = 59) between March 13 and May 15, 2020. Caregivers were, on average, 56.80 years old (SD, 14.22; range, 32-67 years old) and consisted of spouses (n = 2), adult children (n = 3), and a sibling (n = 1). Using NVIVO 12, caregiver diaries were coded for (1) "social connection" (n = 23), defined as being able to access or seeking informal or formal social support networks; (2) "isolation" (n = 17), defined as being unable or reluctant to access informal or formal social support networks, or feeling alone; and (3) "bereavement processes" (n = 147), informed by the dual process model of bereavement (restoration and loss-oriented stressors). Content analysis revealed that caregivers were able to connect with others despite physical distancing expectations, expressed loneliness and grief while in isolation, and described moving on in the face of uncertainty. Findings provide insight into how caregivers experienced bereavement during the initial period of the pandemic and highlight implications for hospice bereavement services.


Subject(s)
Caregivers/psychology , Diaries as Topic , Neoplasms/nursing , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Hospice Care , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology , Social Support
16.
Cancer ; 127(23): 4481-4491, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340245

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Young adult (YA) cancer survivors are at risk for financial toxicity during and after cancer treatment. Financial toxicity has been associated with medical-related cost-coping behaviors such as skipping or delaying treatment. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in dire economic consequences that may worsen financial hardship among young survivors. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional survey; data collection occurred online. A convenience sample was recruited through YA cancer advocacy groups and social media. Negative economic events associated with the COVID-19 pandemic (eg, income loss, increased debt, and decreased job security) and medical-related cost-coping were documented. A validated measure assessed cancer-related financial toxicity. RESULTS: Participants (N = 212) had a mean age of 35.3 years at survey completion and a mean age of 27.4 years at diagnosis. Financial toxicity (mean, 14.0; SD, 9.33) was high. Two-thirds of the sample experienced at least 1 negative economic event during COVID-19, and 71% engaged in at least 1 medical cost-coping behavior. Cost-coping and pandemic-related negative economic events were significantly correlated with cancer-related financial toxicity. In multivariable analyses, pandemic-related negative economic events and financial toxicity were associated with cost-coping. CONCLUSIONS: Acute negative economic events associated with the COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate cancer-related financial toxicity and overall financial hardship among YAs and lead to cost-coping behaviors that can compromise survivorship care and health outcomes. Multilevel, systematic interventions are needed to address the financial needs of YA survivors after the global pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19 , Cancer Survivors , Health Expenditures , Neoplasms , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Neoplasms/economics , Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics
17.
Future Oncol ; 17(31): 4071-4079, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337604

ABSTRACT

Aims: This paper reports the results of a survey assessing the acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine among patients with cancer. Patients and methods: In total, 111 adult patients with cancer from a single institution were asked to complete a questionnaire designed to assess their knowledge about the vaccine, their readiness to be vaccinated and the determinants of their decision. Results: 61.3% of the patients considered themselves more vulnerable to COVID-19 than the general population. Television, radio and newspapers were the major sources of information about the vaccine. A total of 55% of the patients were ready to be vaccinated and 14.4% refused the vaccine. The main reason for refusal was incompatibility with patients' disease or treatment. Conclusion: Most of the patients in this institutional sample accepted the COVID-19 vaccine. Better communication of information with patients is needed to decrease vaccine hesitancy.


Lay abstract Major cancer societies consider vaccinating patients with cancer against COVID-19 a priority. The investigators conducted a survey assessing perceptions of the vaccine among patients with cancer. A total of 111 patients were asked to complete a questionnaire evaluating their knowledge about the vaccine, their readiness to be vaccinated and the determinants of their decision. Most (61.3%) patients considered themselves more susceptible to COVID-19 than the general population. Television, radio and newspapers were the major sources of information about the vaccine. The majority of patients (55%) were ready to be vaccinated and 14.4% refused the vaccine. The main reason for refusal was incompatibility with patients' disease or treatment. Better communication with patients is needed to decrease vaccine hesitancy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Neoplasms/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Hospitals, University , Humans , Lebanon/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Young Adult
18.
Curr Sports Med Rep ; 20(5): 271-276, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322966

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In the spring of 2020, we faced a global pandemic that resulted in social distancing limitations not previously experienced, forcing practitioners to adapt exercise programming to a virtual model. The purpose of this investigation was to measure the effectiveness of a virtual exercise oncology program in 491 participants undergoing antineoplastic therapy between March and June 2020. Each session was completed virtually with a certified exercise oncology trainer. Fitness and psychological parameters were measured preexercise and postexercise intervention. Overall, participants completed 4949 of 5892 prescribed exercise sessions. Patients saw increases in cardiovascular endurance (15.2%, P < 0.05), muscular endurance (18.2%, P < 0.05), flexibility (31.9%, P < 0.05), feelings of support (58.7%, P < 0.05), and quality of life (32.2%, P < 0.05), as well as decreases in loneliness (54%, P < 0.05) and fatigue (48.7%, P < 0.05). In light of our findings, we assert that virtual exercise training is a viable option in circumstances where in-person, individualized exercise training is not possible.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Exercise Therapy/methods , Internet-Based Intervention , Neoplasms/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Checklist , Exercise Therapy/psychology , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Physical Endurance/physiology , Quality of Life , Range of Motion, Articular , Social Support , Symptom Assessment , Treatment Outcome
19.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 25(4): 488, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315868

ABSTRACT

As a nursing student back in the late 1970s, I thought I would not work in oncology because it hit too close to home; my mother, my grandmother, my grandfather, and a college friend had all had cancer. Working with patients with cancer would bring up too many memories and worries to which I would never subject myself.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Neoplasms/nursing , Neoplasms/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Oncology Nursing/methods , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
JNCI Cancer Spectr ; 5(3): Pkab049, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292069

ABSTRACT

The study objective was to identify sociodemographic and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) factors that are associated with COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors. Eligible participants were 18 years or older and were diagnosed with cancer as an AYA (ages 15-39 years) and received services through an AYA cancer program. A total of 342 participants completed a cross-sectional survey. Our primary outcome-COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy-was surveyed as a 5-point Likert scale and operationalized as a binary outcome (agree vs hesitant). A large proportion of participants reported COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy (37.1%). In the multivariable regression, female survivors (odds ratio = 1.81, 95% confidence interval = 1.10 to 2.98) and survivors with a high school education or less (odds ratio = 3.15, 95% confidence interval = 1.41 to 7.04) reported higher odds of vaccine hesitancy compared with their male or college graduate or higher counterparts. COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy persists among AYA survivors despite their recommended priority vaccination status and higher chances of severe COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , /psychology , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cancer Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Multivariate Analysis , Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
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