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2.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 43: e390678, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20241517

ABSTRACT

The theme of the 2023 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting is Partnering With Patients: The Cornerstone of Cancer Care and Research. As we aim to partner with patients to improve their health care, digital tools have the potential to enhance patient-centered cancer care and make clinical research more accessible and generalizable. Using electronic patient-reported outcomes (ePROs) to collect patients' reports of symptoms, functioning, and well-being facilitates patient-clinician communication and improves care and outcomes. Early studies suggest that racial and ethnic minority populations, older patients, and patients with less education may benefit even more from ePRO implementation. Clinical practices looking to implement ePROs can refer to the resources of the PROTEUS Consortium (Patient-Reported Outcomes Tools: Engaging Users & Stakeholders). Beyond ePROs, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, cancer practices have rapidly adopted other digital tools (eg, telemedicine, remote patient monitoring). As implementation grows, we must be aware of the limitations of these tools and implement them in ways to promote optimal function, access, and ease of use. Infrastructure, patient, provider, and system-level barriers need to be addressed. Partnerships across all levels can inform development and implementation of digital tools to meet the needs of diverse groups. In this article, we describe how we use ePROs and other digital health tools in cancer care, how digital tools can expand access to and generalizability of oncology care and research, and prospects for broader implementation and use.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity , Neoplasms , Humans , Ethnicity , Pandemics , Minority Groups , COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy
3.
Support Care Cancer ; 31(7): 376, 2023 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20240047

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to explore the challenges of access to treatment and quality of life in female cancer survivors living in rural areas of Iran within the global pandemic context (COVID-19). METHODS: We conducted a qualitative exploratory study where we recruited nine female-identifying individuals diagnosed with cancer, 23 family members, and five healthcare providers from a hospital affiliated with the Birjand University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews and analyzed using Braun and Clarke's reflective thematic analysis. RESULTS: The three themes constructed were lack of strength from fighting on two fronts (subthemes: (i) fear related to longevity and life span, (ii) disruption of emotional relationships and family functioning, (iii) loneliness and fear of the future, (iv) village culture and double whammy, and (v) isolation and rejection in a rural community); changes during treatment (subthemes: (i) confusion related to treatment and (ii) the hope found during treatment "bottlenecks"); and spiritual growth and clarifying values (subthemes: (i) patience and resilience and (ii) clarifying life values and opportunities when facing uncertainty about the future). CONCLUSION: This study highlights the importance of further evaluating interventions to mitigate barriers to supportive care for female cancer survivors living in rural areas with low-resource contexts during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Female , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Iran , Neoplasms/therapy , Qualitative Research
4.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 70(8): e30473, 2023 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239356

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pediatric patients with cancer infected with COVID-19 may be at higher risk of severe disease and may be unable to mount an adequate response to the virus due to compromised immunity secondary to their cancer therapy. PROCEDURE: This study presents immunologic analyses of 20 pediatric patients with cancer, on active chemotherapy or having previously received chemotherapy, and measures their immunoglobulin titers and activation of cellular immunity response to acute SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 vaccination compared with healthy pediatric controls. RESULTS: Forty-three patients were enrolled, of which 10 were actively receiving chemotherapy, 10 had previously received chemotherapy, and 23 were healthy controls. Pediatric patients with cancer had similar immunoglobulin titers, antibody binding capacity, and effector function assay activity after vaccination against COVID-19 compared with healthy controls, though more variability in response was noted in the cohort actively receiving chemotherapy. Compared with acute infection, vaccination against COVID-19 produced superior immunoglobulin responses, particularly IgA1, IgG1, and IgG3, and elicited superior binding capacity and effector function in children with cancer and healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy and those who had previously received chemotherapy had adequate immune activation after both vaccination and acute infection compared to healthy pediatric controls, although there was a demonstrated variability in response for the patients on active chemotherapy. Vaccination against COVID-19 produced superior immune responses compared to acute SARS-CoV-2 infection in pediatric patients with cancer and healthy children, underscoring the importance of vaccination even in previously infected individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Child , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Neoplasms/therapy , Immunoglobulin A , Immunoglobulin G , Vaccination , Antibodies, Viral , Immunity, Humoral
5.
Oncology (Williston Park) ; 37(1): 25, 2023 01 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239355

ABSTRACT

Richard L. Martin III, MD, MPH, and Stephen Schleicher, MD, MBA, share a perspective on rural cancer care.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Rural Population , Humans , Neoplasms/therapy
6.
Curr Oncol ; 30(5): 4427-4436, 2023 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237023

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the corona pandemic, all courses on physical activity for cancer patients were canceled. The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of switching dancing classes for patients and their partners to online classes. METHODS: Patients and partners from courses at four different locations who consented to the online course offer were asked to fill in a pseudonymous questionnaire on access to the training, technical challenges, acceptance and well-being (1-item visual analog scale from 1 to 10) before and after the training. RESULTS: Sixty-five participants returned the questionnaire (39 patients and 23 partners). Fifty-eight (89.2%) had danced before, and forty-eight (73.8%) had visited at least one course of ballroom dancing for cancer patients before. The first access to the online platform was difficult for 39 participants (60%). Most participants (57; 87.7%) enjoyed the online classes, but 53 (81.5%) rated them as less fun than the real classes as direct contact was missing. Well-being increased significantly after the lesson and remained improved for several days. CONCLUSION: Transforming a dancing class is feasible for participants with digital experience and goes along with technical difficulties. It is a substitute for real classes if mandatory and improves well-being.


Subject(s)
Dancing , Neoplasms , Humans , Pandemics , Exercise , Neoplasms/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Front Immunol ; 14: 1117760, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236664

ABSTRACT

Cytoplasmic DNA is emerging as a pivotal contributor to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and cancer, such as COVID-19 and lung carcinoma. However, the complexity of various cytoplasmic DNA-related pathways and their crosstalk remains challenging to distinguish their specific roles in many distinct inflammatory diseases, especially for the underlying mechanisms. Here, we reviewed the latest findings on cytoplasmic DNA and its signaling pathways in inflammatory lung conditions and lung cancer progression. We found that sustained activation of cytoplasmic DNA sensing pathways contributes to the development of common lung diseases, which may result from external factors or mutations of key genes in the organism. We further discussed the interplays between cytoplasmic DNA and anti-inflammatory or anti-tumor effects for potential immunotherapy. In sum, this review aids in understanding the roles of cytoplasmic DNAs and exploring more therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Immunity, Innate , DNA , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/therapy , Lung
8.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 556, 2023 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236438

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In addition to the common difficulties of ongoing trials, the COVID-19 pandemic posed several challenges to scientists worldwide and created an additional burden for vulnerable patient groups. In the nFC-isPO of individualised treatment for anxiety and depression in newly diagnosed patients with cancer caregivers (e.g. psycho-oncologists) reported elevated HADS scores in newly enrolled patients after the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Accordingly, the question arises whether the pandemic affected HADS scores. Therefore, stratified analyses by the time of enrolment (T1) were performed for patients with 12 months of care (T3). METHODS: Patients with 12 months of care (N = 1,140) were analysed. A comparison within the regression discontinuity design according to the time points at which patients completed the baseline (T1) HADS questionnaire was conducted to examine differences between patients recruited before Q2/2020 (pre-pandemic) and after the coronavirus outbreak. Furthermore, mean HADS scores at T1 and T3 for all quarters during the study were compared. RESULTS: Mean T1 and T3 HADS scores of patients with cancer during the pandemic are only slightly higher than those of the pre-pandemic group. No significant treatment effect was observed in either the pre-pandemic (p = 0.5495, Late = 1.7711) or the post-pandemic group (p = 0.9098, LATE=-0.2933). In contrast, the average local treatment effect in the post-pandemic group suggests a minimal decrease in HADS score in the predefined range and thus a positive treatment effect for isPO. Comparison of mean HADS scores at T1 and T3 did not show a large increase by pandemic-related timepoints, however, a decrease of approximately 2-3 points over each quarter at 12 months compared to baseline is observed. CONCLUSION: The existing nFC-isPO care is resilient to crisis and may counteract external influences such as the Corona pandemic. Accordingly, the pandemic had little influence on the fears of patients with cancer in the nFC-isPO. This emphasises that psycho-oncology is vital for the reduction of stress, anxiety and depression in patients with cancer. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was registered in the German Clinical Trials Registry on 30 October 2018 under the ID "DRKS00015326".


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Neoplasms/therapy , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Psycho-Oncology , Clinical Trials as Topic
9.
Nutrition ; 112: 112057, 2023 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234410

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to identify the clinical usefulness of assessing nutritional status using validated tools for the indication of enteral nutrition for patients with incurable cancer in palliative care. METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, patients were assessed for nutritional risk using the Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment and for cancer cachexia (CC) using the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score upon enrollment and after ∼30 d. The outcome was stable or improved Karnofsky Performance Status. Logistic regression models were used, providing the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: A total of 180 patients participated. The only nutritional status parameter that was associated with function was CC. The less severe the CC, the more likely Karnofsky Performance Status was to remain stable or improve over 30 d (non-cachectic: OR = 1.95; 95% CI, 1.01-3.47; malnourished: OR = 1.06; 95% CI, 1.01-1.42). Furthermore, white skin color (OR = 1.79; 95% CI, 1.04-2.47), higher educational level (OR = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.13-2.78), and inadequate calorie intake (OR = 1.96; 95% CI, 1.02-2.81) were also associated with the outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Using the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score to identify the existence and severity of CC, which is associated with function, has the potential to help clinical decision making concerning the indication of enteral nutrition in patients with incurable cancer receiving palliative care.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Palliative Care , Humans , Prospective Studies , Prognosis , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Nutritional Status , Cachexia/therapy , Cachexia/complications , Decision Making
10.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 115(5): 597-600, 2023 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233201

ABSTRACT

We investigated the association of SARS CoV-2 vaccination with COVID-19 severity in a longitudinal study of adult cancer patients with COVID-19. A total of 1610 patients who were within 14 days of an initial positive SARS CoV-2 test and had received recent anticancer treatment or had a history of stem cell transplant or CAR-T cell therapy were enrolled between May 21, 2020, and February 1, 2022. Patients were considered fully vaccinated if they were 2 weeks past their second dose of mRNA vaccine (BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273) or a single dose of adenovirus vector vaccine (Ad26.COV2.S) at the time of positive SARS CoV-2 test. We defined severe COVID-19 disease as hospitalization for COVID-19 or death within 30 days. Vaccinated patients were significantly less likely to develop severe disease compared with those who were unvaccinated (odds ratio = 0.44, 95% confidence interval = 0.28 to 0.72, P < .001). These results support COVID-19 vaccination among cancer patients receiving active immunosuppressive treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Adult , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ad26COVS1 , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19 Vaccines , Longitudinal Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , Neoplasms/therapy
11.
Cells ; 12(11)2023 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245425

ABSTRACT

Since their formal discovery in 1975, natural killer (NK) cells have always been proposed in the literature as a potential treatment for cancer and viral infections [...].


Subject(s)
Killer Cells, Natural , Neoplasms , Humans , Immunotherapy , Neoplasms/therapy
12.
J Med Internet Res ; 25: e46721, 2023 05 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245387

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the benefits of digital health technology use, older adults with cancer (ie, aged 65 years) have reported challenges to technology adoption. However, there has been a lack of a good understanding of their digital health technology use patterns and the associated influential factors in the past few years. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the trends in and factors associated with digital health technology use among older adults with cancer. METHODS: The National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) data set is a national longitudinal cohort study with annual survey waves of Medicare beneficiaries 65 years and older. Participants were community-dwelling older adults who self-reported previous or current cancer diagnoses in each round. The study sample size of each round ranged from 1996 (2015) to 1131 (2021). Digital health technology use was defined as using the internet or online in the last month to order or refill prescriptions, contact medical providers, handle Medicare or other insurance matters, or get information about their health conditions. The association of sociodemographics, clinical factors (self-rated health, chronic conditions, difficulties in activities of daily living, dementia, anxiety, and depression), and physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery and grip strength) with digital health technology use was examined using design-based logistic regression. All statistical analyses accounted for the complex sample design. RESULTS: The prevalence of any digital health technology use increased from 36% in 2015 to 45% in 2019. In 2020-2021, which was amid the COVID-19 pandemic, it ranged from 51% to 52%. In terms of each digital health technology use behavior, in 2015, overall, 28% of older cancer survivors used digital health technology to obtain health information, followed by contacting clinicians (19%), filling prescriptions (14%), and handling insurance (11%). Greater use of digital health technology was associated with younger age, being White, having a college or higher education, having a higher income, having more comorbidities, nondementia, and having a higher gait speed. CONCLUSIONS: Digital health technology use in older adults with cancer has gradually increased, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, socioeconomic and racial disparities have remained in older cancer survivors. Additionally, older adults with cancer may have some unique features associated with digital health technology use; for example, their use of digital health may be increased by their comorbidities (ie, health care needs) and reduced by their frailty.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Aged , United States , Medicare , Longitudinal Studies , Activities of Daily Living , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Biomedical Technology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy
13.
J Registry Manag ; 49(4): 114-125, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245303

ABSTRACT

Background: Individuals with a history of cancer may be more susceptible to severe COVID-19 due to immunosuppression, comorbidities, or ongoing treatment. We linked inpatient claims data on COVID-19 hospitalizations to cancer diagnoses from the New York State Cancer Registry (NYSCR) to examine associations between prior cancer diagnoses and hospitalizations for COVID-19, and factors associated with death at discharge after COVID-19 hospitalization. Methods: New York State (NYS) residents diagnosed with invasive cancer before July 1, 2021, who were alive on January 1, 2020, were identified from NYSCR data. We obtained claims data for discharge year 2020 and the first half of 2021 from NYS's Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS), and we linked inpatient records with COVID-19 as the primary diagnosis to cancer data from the NYSCR using deterministic matching methods. We calculated descriptive statistics and conducted multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analyses to examine associations of cancer case characteristics with COVID-19 hospitalization and with vital status at discharge among patients with a history of cancer. All analyses were conducted in SAS 9.4. Results: Our analysis included 1,257,377 individuals with a history of cancer, 10,210 of whom had a subsequent primary COVID-19 hospitalization. Individuals with a history of cancer were 16% more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19, compared to the general population of NYS, after adjusting for age and sex (95% CI, 14%-19%). Factors independently associated with COVID-19 hospitalization among cancer patients included older age, male sex, non-Hispanic Black race or Hispanic ethnicity, diagnosis with late-stage cancer or with multiple tumors, more recent cancer diagnosis, and New York City (NYC) residency at the time of cancer diagnosis. Factors independently associated with death at discharge among individuals with COVID-19 hospitalization and a prior cancer diagnosis included older age, male sex, non-Hispanic Black or non-Hispanic Asian/Pacific Islander race or Hispanic ethnicity, residence in NYC at the time of COVID-19 hospitalization, and an active cancer diagnosis claim code at the time of COVID-19 hospitalization. Conclusion: This claims-based study identified higher risks of COVID-19 hospitalization and death at discharge among individuals with a history of cancer, and particularly those in certain demographic and diagnostic groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Ethnicity , Hospitalization , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , New York City/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Female , Aged
14.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 19(2): 2222648, 2023 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245273

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccination is effective for cancer patients without safety concerns. However, COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy is common among cancer patients. This study investigated factors affecting primary COVID-19 vaccination series completion rate among cancer patients in China. A multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted in four Chinese cities in different geographic regions between May and June 2022. A total of 893 cancer inpatients provided written informed consent and completed the study. Logistic regression models were fitted. Among the participants, 58.8% completed the primary COVID-19 vaccination series. After adjusting for background characteristics, concerns about interactions between COVID-19 vaccination and cancers/cancer treatment (adjusted odds ratios [AOR]: 0.97, 95%CI: 0.94, 0.99) were associated with lower completion of primary vaccination series. In addition, perceived higher risk of COVID-19 infection comparing to people without cancers (AOR: 0.46, 95%CI: 0.24, 0.88), perceived a high chance of having severe consequences of COVID-19 infection (AOR: 0.68, 95%CI: 0.51, 0.91) were also associated with lower completion rate. Being suggested by significant others (AOR: 1.32, 95%CI: 1.23, 1.41) and perceived higher self-efficacy to receive COVID-19 vaccination (AOR: 1.48, 95%CI: 1.31, 1.67) were positively associated with the dependent variable. Completion rate of primary COVID-19 vaccination series was low among Chinese cancer patients. Given the large population size and their vulnerability, this group urgently needs to increase COVID-19 vaccination coverage. Removing concerns about interactions between COVID-19 vaccination and cancers, using fear appeal approach, involving significant others, and facilitating patients to make a plan to receive COVID-19 vaccination might be useful strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Asian People , Vaccination
15.
J Registry Manag ; 49(2): 62-63, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242846
17.
Cancer Invest ; 41(5): 456-466, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2327073

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The cancer population is significantly impacted by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) due to inherent risks of infection imposed by malignancy and therapeutic agents. Evaluating risk factors in this group will lead to improved guidelines for the treatment of malignancy in the setting of a COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This retrospective study reviewed 295 inpatient cancer patients positive for COVID-19 between February 2020 and December 2021 to determine specific risk factors of mortality and associated complications. Various patient characteristics were collected to evaluate outcomes in patient death, oxygen requirement, ventilatory support, and increased length of stay. RESULTS: 31 (10.5%) of 295 patients died due to COVID-19. Of those that died, the majority had hematologic cancer (48.4%). There was no difference in the odds of death among the cancer groups. Those vaccinated had a reduced risk of death (OR 0.04, CI 0-0.23). Patients with lung cancer (OR 3.69, CI 1.13-12.31), obesity (OR 3.27, CI 1.18-9.27), CHF (OR 2.68, CI 1.07-6.89) were more likely to require ventilation. Those treated with hormonal therapy had higher odds of having a prolonged admission (OR 5.04, CI 1.17-2.53). Otherwise, cancer therapy had no significant difference in any outcome. CONCLUSION: The mortality rate of cancer patients was 10.5%, lower than in other studies. Vaccinations had mortality benefits, but no effect on hypoxia, ventilator use, or LOS. Delaying cancer therapy during peak infection is likely not necessary based on the results of this study. With improved knowledge in the risks of infection and the utility of personalized precautions, both providers and patients can better prepare for another potential wave of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies , Virginia , Pandemics , Universities , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy
18.
Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg ; 116(9): 767-797, 2022 09 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326165

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, has currently affected >220 million individuals worldwide. The complex interplay of immune dysfunction, active malignancy, the effect of cancer treatment on the immune system and additional comorbidities associated with cancer and COVID-19 all affect the outcomes of COVID-19 in patients with cancer. We have discussed the published findings (through the end of September 2021) on the effects of cancer on the morbidity and mortality of COVID-19, common factors between cancer and COVID-19, the interaction of cancer and COVID-19 treatments, the impact of COVID-19 on cancer clinical services, immune test findings in cancer patients with COVID-19 and the long-term effects of COVID-19 on cancer survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Comorbidity , Humans , Neoplasms/complications , Neoplasms/therapy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Am J Clin Oncol ; 43(6): 452-455, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312310

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a novel coronavirus called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) caused an outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Severe complications have been reported to occur in 33% of patients with COVID-19 and include acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute renal failure, acute respiratory injury, septic shock, and severe pneumonia. Currently, there is no specific treatment or approved vaccine against COVID-19 and many clinical trials are currently investigating potential medications to treat COVID-19. The immunosuppressed status of some cancer patients (whether caused by the disease itself or the treatment) increases their risk of infection compared with the general population. This short review aims to focus on the impact of COVID-19 on a cancer patient and discuss management options and recommendation in addition to highlighting the currently available clinical guidelines and resources.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Health Personnel/standards , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Management , Humans , Incidence , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
BMC Cancer ; 23(1): 439, 2023 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319030

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has impacted both society and medical care. While Germany entered the first lockdown in spring 2020, the PIKKO study (Patient information, communication and competence empowerment in oncology) was still active. The intervention modules, patient navigator (PN), services of the Saarland Cancer Society (SCS), psycho-social counseling and different courses, and online knowledge database (ODB) continued to be offered, but in an adapted form. It was the aim of this supplementary survey to identify the restrictions and burdens of the pandemic containment strategies on the PIKKO patients and thus on the PIKKO study itself. Furthermore, this work shows how the PIKKO modules were used during the lockdown. METHODS: All patients in the PIKKO intervention group (IG) were invited to complete a questionnaire, n = 503. Furthermore, utilization of the SCS and log files of the ODB were analyzed. For socio-demographic data and contacts with the PN, data from the regular PIKKO surveys were used. In addition to descriptive statistics, chi²-tests, F-tests and linear regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: 356 patients participated in this supplemental survey. 37.6% reported restrictions. "Restrictions on accompanying persons", "ban on visits to the wards" and "protective mouth-nose-mask" were reported as the greatest burdens. 39.0% expressed fears that the restrictions would have an impact on the course of their disease. Linear regression analyses showed differences in feelings of burden among age groups (more among < 60-year-olds), gender (more among women), children in the household (more with children), and preexisting financial stress (more with financial worries). In April 2020, there was more patient contact with PNs by phone, more SCS psycho-social counseling by phone, adapted SCS course offering, but with significantly fewer participants, and high activity on the ODB. CONCLUSION: Cancer patients in the IG reported restrictions from the pandemic containment strategies and feared an impact on their recovery. However, whether a burden is perceived as heavy depends more on gender, age, or pre-existing burdens than on whether the lockdown affects PIKKO or not. The utilization of counseling, courses or the ODB despite lockdown shows the need for such services, especially in times of crisis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study was retrospectively registered in the German Clinical Trial Register under DRKS00016703 (21 Feb 2019, retrospectively registered). https://www.drks.de/drks_web/navigate.do?navigationId=trial.HTML&TRIAL_ID=DRKS00016703 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Child , Female , Humans , Communicable Disease Control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care
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