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1.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 472, 2022 Apr 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779645

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The current COVID-19 pandemic interferes with family lives across the world, particularly families of children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) are at a greater risk for being negatively impacted by the pandemic. Together with representatives from this caregiver population the aim was to explore the interference associated with normal family life caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: This is a descriptive study using a cross-sectional design. Following a strategic network sampling strategy, a user-developed national survey was completed by a larger sample (N = 1,186) of parents and informal caregivers of children with NDDs. The survey utilized a combination of both closed and open-ended questions, and a logistic regression analysis was carried out to assess the association between family characteristics, characteristics of the child, and COVID-19 related family life interference. Before carrying out the regression an inductive content analysis of the open-ended question on `How has the isolation affected the family´ was carried out to construct the outcome variable. RESULTS: The initial analysis indicated that the COVID-19 pandemic induced a shift in everyday family life and a lack of guidance and support related to managing the challenges they were facing. Caregivers who reported that COVID-19 had significantly interfered with their family life, were more likely to report having anxious children, and to have experienced an increased number of conflicts at home. The logistic regression showed that both anxious children and increased conflicts considerably increased the risk for reporting family life interference compared to those that reported no increased conflicts or anxious children. DISCUSSION: Considering how the COVID-19 related increased conflicts at home and anxious children threaten the family life of the NDD caregiver population, as an external source of family stress, which might lead to negative impact on their mental and physical well-being, the need for further research in collaboration with user representatives is apparent. Our study suggests that more information should be provided to healthcare providers, social professionals, peers, people with NDDs, and caregivers of people with NDDs about the potential threats that a stressful life event such as the current pandemic can pose to their mental and physical health and their family life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurodevelopmental Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480747

ABSTRACT

Parents of children with a neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD) report higher levels of distress compared to those of typically developing children. Distress levels may be heightened by the restrictions associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. However, it is unclear whether distress levels of parents varied by the diagnosis of neurodevelopmental disorder in children during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aims to investigate whether parental distress was influenced by the type of NDD. Participants were from Australia (N = 196) and Italy (N = 200); the parents of children aged 3-18 were invited to complete an online self-reported survey which included the 6-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6) to determine parental distress. The results show that intellectual or learning disorder (ILD) is a major contributor to parental distress compared to other NDDs in both Australia and Italy. Moreover, the worsening of symptomatic changes in children with NDDs was significantly associated with parental distress. The differences between the two countries in terms of the pandemic impact, however, were not statistically significant. The results suggest that intervention strategies need to be tailored for individual clinical information and factor in the society's stringency level of anti-contagion policies to improve parental wellbeing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurodevelopmental Disorders , Psychological Distress , Child , Humans , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Neuropharmacology ; 201: 108841, 2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466809

ABSTRACT

A strong association between perinatal viral infections and neurodevelopmental disorders has been established. Both the direct contact of the virus with the developing brain and the strong maternal immune response originated by viral infections can impair proper neurodevelopment. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the highly-infectious severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is currently responsible for a large global outbreak and is a major public health issue. While initial studies focused on the viral impact on the respiratory system, increasing evidence suggest that SARS-CoV-2 infects other organs and tissues including the mature brain. While studies continue to determine the neuropathology associated to COVID-19, the consequences of SARS-CoV-2 infection to the developing brain remain largely unexplored. The present review discusses evidence suggesting that SARS-CoV-2 infection may have persistent effects on the course of pregnancy and on brain development. Studies have shown that several proinflammatory mediators which are increased in the SARS-CoV-2-associated cytokine storm, are also modified in other viral infections known to increase the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. In this sense, further studies should assess the genuine effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy and delivery along with an extended follow-up of the offspring, including neurocognitive, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological examination. It also remains to be determined whether and by which mechanisms SARS-CoV-2 intrauterine and early life infection could lead to an increased risk of developing neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism (ASD) and schizophrenia (SZ), in the offspring.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects/epidemiology , Schizophrenia/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/immunology , Brain/embryology , Brain/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/immunology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects/immunology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Schizophrenia/immunology
6.
Lancet Psychiatry ; 8(10): 929-936, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1415873

ABSTRACT

Informal (unpaid) carers are an integral part of all societies and the health and social care systems in the UK depend on them. Despite the valuable contributions and key worker status of informal carers, their lived experiences, wellbeing, and needs have been neglected during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this Health Policy, we bring together a broad range of clinicians, researchers, and people with lived experience as informal carers to share their thoughts on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on UK carers, many of whom have felt abandoned as services closed. We focus on the carers of children and young people and adults and older adults with mental health diagnoses, and carers of people with intellectual disability or neurodevelopmental conditions across different care settings over the lifespan. We provide policy recommendations with the aim of improving outcomes for all carers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Health Policy/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Services Needs and Demand/legislation & jurisprudence , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Caregivers/economics , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , Intellectual Disability/epidemiology , Intellectual Disability/psychology , Life Change Events , Male , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Morbidity/trends , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Social Support , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
8.
Turk J Pediatr ; 63(4): 648-659, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1375560

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lockdown due to Corona pandemic is an unprecedented event, which has had a profound impact on the lives of children across all ages. Its effects on children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders (NDD) has not been adequately studied. This study was performed in order to explore the effects of lockdown during the Corona pandemic on children with NDD and their parents. METHODS: The survey was conducted in three Indian tertiary-care hospitals wherein parents of children with NDD were requested to respond to an online questionnaire. The questions attempted to elicit various aspects of the children`s therapies and behavioural profiles as well as their parents` experiences during the pandemic related lockdown. RESULTS: 135/188 (71.8%) parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)(n=104), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (n=26) and Learning Disability (LD)(n=5) responded. Pre-lockdown, 133 (99%) children were receiving regular institution-based therapy, which ceased intra-lockdown. Mean cumulative home-based therapy duration significantly increased during lockdown (p=0.03). Parents reported significantly increased temper tantrums in children (p=0.02). They perceived that during lockdown, their children were bored and their interactions and speech worsened. Majority of parents reported worsening of own qualities of life, but felt confident of taking care of their children during lockdown. CONCLUSIONS: To conclude, children with NDD and their parents were significantly affected by Corona pandemicrelated lockdown. Institutional therapy discontinuation, behavioural deterioration (especially among ASD and ADHD) and parental stress were prominent challenges whereas parental motivation and reliance on homebased therapy were the positive highlights. The survey points to the role of regular parent-administered homebased therapy in children with NDD, especially to tide over similar unexpected adverse scenarios.


Subject(s)
Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Neurodevelopmental Disorders , Child , Humans , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , Parents , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry ; 27(1): 269-277, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269857

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has grossly impacted lives of people across the globe. In particular, children have also been affected due to closure of schools, therapy, and day care centers. Families have been challenged with new circumstances, and mental health professionals are coming up with novel ways to help these families who have children with mental health issues. This article describes experiences of families who have children with a diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder with comorbid mental health difficulties and their ways of coping with the pandemic challenges. The series will throw light on ground level experiences of families during the pandemic, give insights into their ways of adapting, and brings out problem areas which healthcare professionals must work on, to design novel ways of care. The case series is novel and a similar report has probably not been presented from India or other low and middle income countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurodevelopmental Disorders , Child , Developing Countries , Humans , Mental Health , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Child Adolesc Ment Health ; 26(3): 272-273, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269724

ABSTRACT

Following COVID-19, there has been increasing concern about the well-being of children and young people across the United Kingdom; however, our major problem is the lack of robust data. We discuss emerging research capturing the impact of restrictions and experiences of COVID-19 on children and young people. We suggest further and more detailed analysis is urgently required to inform an evidence-based response. We conclude that although most of the UK's kids are probably OK, it is essential that those who are in need of support receive timely and informed intervention.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Health , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Psychology, Adolescent , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Family , Family Conflict , Female , Food Supply , Humans , Male , Schools , United Kingdom
11.
J Autism Dev Disord ; 52(5): 2149-2155, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252167

ABSTRACT

In March 2020, many schools were closed to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in Japan, and it is predicted that many children, especially those with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), will be affected emotionally and behaviorally. Here, we examined the impact of school closures due to COVID-19 on school-aged children with NDDs using the Child Behavior Checklist. Totally, data on 121 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and/or intellectual disorder were analyzed and it was found that externalizing and aggressive behavior increased in all NDDs, regardless of the type of diagnosis. A clear prospect is important for children with NDDs children to lead a stable life, and more generous supports for children with NDDs and their families are needed.


Subject(s)
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity , Autism Spectrum Disorder , COVID-19 , Neurodevelopmental Disorders , Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/psychology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/epidemiology , Autism Spectrum Disorder/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/diagnosis , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/psychology
12.
J Pediatr Psychol ; 46(5): 514-525, 2021 06 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147986

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Prolonged home isolation may lead to long-term negative consequences for both children and caregivers' psychological wellbeing, especially in families with children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Therefore, a scoping review was conducted to identify challenges faced by caregivers of children with neurodevelopmental disorders during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and to consolidate parenting interventions and guidelines. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted on Embase, PsycInfo, PubMed, Scopus, and LitCovid. All article types published between December 2019 and November 2020 which reported on intervention guidelines and experiences of families with children with neurodevelopmental disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic were included. Qualitative themes, quantitative data, and article summaries were charted, and a thematic analysis was conducted. RESULTS: Twenty-nine articles were included in the review. Three themes were generated: (a) behavioral issues and health concerns, (b) disruptions of lifelines and daily routines, and (c) existing programs, models, and guidelines to support families. Additionally, a list of caregiver strategies such as scheduling regular online consultations, maintaining online therapy, educating a child on COVID-19, and preventive behaviors, creating a structured daily schedule and reinforcement system, and selecting child-appropriate activities was consolidated. CONCLUSION: This review revealed a lack of evidence-based studies and articles on children with other neurodevelopmental disorders apart from autism and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. It also places emphasis on the importance of telehealth services as major lifelines to parents during this pandemic and urges healthcare organizations to provide funding to increase telehealth services to afflicted families.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurodevelopmental Disorders , Humans , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/etiology , Pandemics , Parenting , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Br J Psychiatry ; 218(6): 302-304, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112458

ABSTRACT

We explore whether the needs of individuals with neurodevelopment disorders have been overlooked during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and set out the issues that need to be considered in response to future health crises and pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Neurodevelopmental Disorders , Humans , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 19(1): 21, 2021 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102340

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Active pediatric COVID-19 pneumonia and MIS-C are two disease processes requiring rapid diagnosis and different treatment protocols. OBJECTIVE: To distinguish active pediatric COVID-19 pneumonia and MIS-C using presenting signs and symptoms, patient characteristics, and laboratory values. DESIGN: Patients diagnosed and hospitalized with active COVID-19 pneumonia or MIS-C at Children's of Alabama Hospital in Birmingham, AL from April 1 through September 1, 2020 were identified retrospectively. Active COVID-19 and MIS-C cases were defined using diagnostic codes and verified for accuracy using current US Centers for Disease Control case definitions. All clinical notes were reviewed for documentation of COVID-19 pneumonia or MIS-C, and clinical notes and electronic medical records were reviewed for patient demographics, presenting signs and symptoms, prior exposure to or testing for the SARS-CoV-2 virus, laboratory data, imaging, treatment modalities and response to treatment. FINDINGS: 111 patients were identified, with 74 classified as mild COVID-19, 8 patients as moderate COVID-19, 8 patients as severe COVID-19, 10 as mild MIS-C and 11 as severe MIS-C. All groups had a male predominance, with Black and Hispanic patients overrepresented as compared to the demographics of Alabama. Most MIS-C patients were healthy at baseline, with most COVID-19 patients having at least one underlying illness. Fever, rash, conjunctivitis, and gastrointestinal symptoms were predominant in the MIS-C population whereas COVID-19 patients presented with predominantly respiratory symptoms. The two groups were similar in duration of symptomatic prodrome and exposure history to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, but MIS-C patients had a longer duration between presentation and exposure history. COVID-19 patients were more likely to have a positive SAR-CoV-2 PCR and to require respiratory support on admission. MIS-C patients had lower sodium levels, higher levels of C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, d-dimer and procalcitonin. COVID-19 patients had higher lactate dehydrogenase levels on admission. MIS-C patients had coronary artery changes on echocardiography more often than COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study is one of the first to directly compare COVID-19 and MIS-C in the pediatric population. The significant differences found between symptoms at presentation, demographics, and laboratory findings will aide health-care providers in distinguishing the two disease entities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Adolescent , African Americans , Asthma/epidemiology , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Comorbidity , Conjunctivitis/physiopathology , Coronary Artery Disease , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diarrhea/physiopathology , Dilatation, Pathologic , Echocardiography , Exanthema/physiopathology , Female , Fever/physiopathology , Heart Defects, Congenital/epidemiology , Humans , Hyponatremia/metabolism , Male , Nausea/physiopathology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Distribution , Stroke Volume , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/metabolism , Time Factors , Vomiting/physiopathology
15.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 3042, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085409

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to reveal how the COVID-19 stay-at-home period has affected the quality of life (QOL) of children with neurodevelopmental disorders and their parents and to identify possible factors that enabled them to maintain their QOL. We enrolled 136 school-aged children (intellectual quotient ≥ 50) and their parents and administered QOL questionnaires to assess the maladaptive behavior of the children; depression, anxiety, and stress of the parents; and activities of their daily lives. The relationship between their QOL and clinical features was examined. The decrease in QOL of children and parents was associated with the mother's limited job flexibility. Decreased QOL was also associated with changes in the sleep rhythms of the children. Maladaptive behaviors in children were associated with parental stress. However, maintained QOL of some families who faced these same conditions of job stress and sleep disorders was associated with less parental stress, less parental depression and anxiety, and milder maladaptive behavior in children. Both mothers with limited job flexibility and changes in the sleep rhythm of children were associated with reduced QOL of children and their parents. Low parental stress was associated with decreased maladaptive behavior in children and with maintained QOL of the family.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Disabled Children/psychology , Disabled Children/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Japan , Male , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/psychology , Parents/psychology , Sleep
17.
Acta Paediatr ; 110(4): 1281-1288, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1041842

ABSTRACT

AIM: To examine how the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic impacts child well-being and family functioning, particularly among children at risk for neurodevelopmental impairments. METHODS: Families of 73 typically developing children, 54 children born very preterm (VPT) and 73 children with congenital heart disease (CHD) from two prospective cohort studies were assessed prior to (mean age: 10.4 [SD: 1.2] years) and during (mean age: 12.8 [SD: 2.0] years) the pandemic, more specifically, in April/May 2020. Child well-being and family functioning were assessed with validated, parent-reported questionnaires and tested with linear mixed models. Group comparison of child distress and parental concerns related to medical implications of COVID-19 and homeschooling, assessed with 5-point Likert scales, was done with Mann-Whitney U tests. RESULTS: Children's psychological well-being and family functioning (both, p < 0.001) decreased significantly during the pandemic, irrespective of group. Children with CHD were reported to be more concerned about becoming infected with SARS-CoV-2 than were others. Child distress due to homeschooling and parents' concerns about children's academic achievements were significantly higher in VPT and CHD children than in typically developing peers (all p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic substantially impacts the whole family and leads to additional distress in families with children at risk for neurodevelopmental impairments. These families should receive individualised counselling and assistance from healthcare providers and schools during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Defects, Congenital/complications , Infant, Premature, Diseases/etiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/etiology , Adolescent , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family Relations/psychology , Female , Health Surveys , Heart Defects, Congenital/psychology , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , Infant, Premature, Diseases/diagnosis , Infant, Premature, Diseases/psychology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mental Health , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/diagnosis , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/psychology , Neuropsychological Tests , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Risk Factors , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Switzerland/epidemiology
18.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(1): e22619, 2021 01 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1040099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to COVID-19, there has been increasing momentum in telehealth development and delivery. To assess the anticipated exponential growth in telehealth, it is important to accurately capture how telehealth has been used in specific mental health fields prior to the pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aimed to highlight how telehealth has been used with clinical samples in the neurodevelopmental field, including patients with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), their families, and health care professionals. To identify which technologies show the greatest potential for implementation into health services, we evaluated technologies for effectiveness, economic impact, and readiness for clinical adoption. METHODS: A systematic search of literature was undertaken in April 2018 and updated until December 2019, by using the Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE, and PsycInfo databases. Extracted data included the type of technology, how the technology was used (ie, assessment, treatment, and monitoring), participant characteristics, reported outcomes and authors' views on clinical effectiveness, user impact (ie, feasibility and acceptability), economic impact, and readiness for clinic adoption. A quality review of the research was performed in accordance with the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. RESULTS: A total of 42 studies met the inclusion criteria. These studies included participants and family members with autism spectrum disorders (21/42, 50%), attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (8/42, 19%), attention deficit hyperactivity or autism spectrum disorders (3/42, 7%), communication disorders (7/42, 17%), and tic disorders (2/42, 5%). The focus of most studies (33/42, 79%) was on treatment, rather than assessment (4/42, 10%) or monitoring (5/42, 12%). Telehealth services demonstrated promise for being clinically effective, predominantly in relation to diagnosing and monitoring NDDs. In terms of NDD treatment, telehealth services were usually equivalent to control groups. There was some evidence of positive user and economic impacts, including increased service delivery efficiency (eg, increased treatment availability and decreased waiting times). However, these factors were not widely recorded across the studies. Telehealth was demonstrated to be cost-effective in the few studies that considered cost-effectiveness. Study quality varied, as many studies had small sample sizes and inadequate control groups. Of the 42 studies, only 11 (26%) were randomized controlled trials, 12 (29%) were case studies or case series, 6 (14%) were qualitative studies, and 5 (12%) were noncomparative trials. CONCLUSIONS: Telehealth has the potential to increase treatment availability, decrease diagnosis waiting times, and aid in NDD monitoring. Further research with more robust and adequately powered study designs that consider cost-effectiveness and increased efficiency is needed. This systematic review highlights the extent of telehealth technology use prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and the movement for investing in remote access to treatments. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews CRD42018091156; https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?ID=CRD42018091156.


Subject(s)
Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/therapy , Telemedicine/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Qualitative Research
19.
Res Dev Disabil ; 109: 103840, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989160

ABSTRACT

Research on the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic highlighted negative effects on the general population and particularly on parents. However, little is known about families of children with Neurodevelopmental Disorder (NDD). The present study investigated parental stress, coparenting, and child adjustment in Italian families with children with NDD (N = 82) and typical developing children (TD, N = 82) during lockdown, using an online survey. Results of quantitative analyses showed a significant increase in parental stress and child externalizing behaviors, but not of coparenting. Parental stress is predicted by externalizing behaviors, and coparenting acted as a moderator in the relationship between the change in the amount of time spent with the children before and during lockdown and parental stress. In children with NDD, the decrease in therapeutic/rehabilitation support predicted higher externalizing behaviors. Qualitative analysis showed that beyond the difficulties and worries arising during lockdown, most of the parents appreciated the opportunity of spending more time with their children and strengthening the parent-child relationship. In conclusion, our results point out the importance of ensuring continuity of care for children with NDD (e.g. telehealth) during home confinement and of providing psychological support for parents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Neurodevelopmental Disorders , Parents/psychology , Problem Behavior/psychology , Stress, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Child Behavior , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Needs Assessment , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/psychology , Psychosocial Support Systems , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods
20.
Clin Neuropsychol ; 34(7-8): 1380-1394, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733443

ABSTRACT

Objective: To describe the challenges related to COVID-19 affecting pediatric neuropsychologists practicing in inpatient brain injury rehabilitation settings, and offer solutions focused on face-to-face care and telehealth.Methods: A group of pediatric neuropsychologists from 12 pediatric rehabilitation units in North America and 2 in South America have met regularly since COVID-19 stay-at-home orders were initiated in many parts of the world. This group discussed challenges to clinical care and collaboratively problem-solvedsolutions.Results: Three primary challenges to usual care were identified, these include difficulty providing 1) neurobehavioral and cognitive assessments; 2) psychoeducation for caregivers and rapport building; and 3) return to academic instruction and home. Solutions during the pandemic for the first two areas focus on the varying service provision models that include 1) face-to-face care with personal protective equipment (PPE) and social distancing and 2) provision of care via remote methods, with a focus on telehealth. During the pandemic,neuropsychologists generally combine components of both the face-to-face and remote care models. Solutions to the final challenge focus on issues specific to returning to academic instruction and home after an inpatient stay.Conclusions: By considering components of in-person and telehealth models of patient care during the pandemic, neuropsychologists successfully serve patients within the rehabilitation setting, as well as the patient's family who may be limited in their ability to be physically present due to childcare, illness, work-related demands, or hospital restrictions.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/rehabilitation , Neuropsychology/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Telemedicine/trends , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Inpatients/psychology , Male , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/epidemiology , Neurodevelopmental Disorders/psychology , Neuropsychological Tests , Neuropsychology/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods
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