Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 27
Filter
1.
South Med J ; 115(3): 227-231, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726957

ABSTRACT

Abstract: COVID-19 has affected many people all around the world for more than two years now have suffered many long-term consequences which is commonly referred to as long-haulers. Despite multiorgan complaints in long haulers, symptoms related to cognitive functions commonly referred as brain fog are seen in the high risk covid patients with age more than 50, women more than men, obesity, asthma and those who experienced more than five symptoms during the first week of covid illness. Long term isolation has certainly contributed to high level of anxiety and stress calling for an empathetic response to this group of covid patients as there is no specific test to detect long haulers and no specific cognitive rehabilitation techniques available as of today.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/rehabilitation , Neurocognitive Disorders/rehabilitation , Neurocognitive Disorders/virology , Neurological Rehabilitation , Humans
2.
Rev Neurol ; 73(7): 249-257, 2021 10 01.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1668066

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: On 13 March 2020, a state of alarm was declared due to the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in total lockdown in Spain. The neurorehabilitation centres of the Fundacio Esclerosi Multiple (FEM) provide care for people diagnosed with neuroprogressive diseases with significant health deficits. We look at how lockdown can affect their way of life. AIMS: To assess and manage the impact of lockdown on persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurodegenerative diseases. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Analytical observational study. An anonymous questionnaire was administered to all the patients undergoing comprehensive rehabilitation treatment at two of the FEM centres; the survey included questions on the demographic and clinical characteristics of the subjects, and an assessment of the impact of the pandemic on the physical, social and psychological spheres. RESULTS: A total of 202 surveys were analysed. The average age of the participants was 49.09 years and 77.8% had MS, while 22.2% had other conditions. The most frequently reported physical symptoms were muscle weakness, loss of balance and fatigue. The study population remained active during lockdown. More than half of them did not report any increase in cognitive symptoms, but they did mention an increased sense of worry on an emotional level. CONCLUSIONS: We can state that the actions deployed by the FEM to reduce the consequences of lockdown have been effective and have minimised the occurrence of maladaptive behaviours. The study has also opened the door for us to add new lines of intervention.


TITLE: Evaluación del impacto del confinamiento sobre la salud y el estilo de vida de las personas usuarias de los centros neurorrehabilitadores de Lleida y Reus de la Fundació Esclerosi Múltiple.Introducción. El día 13 de marzo de 2020 se decretó el estado de alarma con motivo de la pandemia de la COVID-19, lo que supuso un confinamiento domiciliario total en España. Los centros neurorrehabilitadores de la Fundació Esclerosi Múltiple (FEM) atienden a personas diagnosticadas de enfermedades neuroprogresivas con déficits de salud importantes. Analizamos cómo el confinamiento puede afectar a su forma de vida. Objetivos. Evaluar y gestionar el impacto del confinamiento en la persona con esclerosis múltiple (EM) y otras enfermedades neurodegenerativas. Pacientes y métodos. Estudio observacional analítico. Se aplicó un cuestionario anónimo a todas las personas que estaban en tratamiento rehabilitador integral en dos de los centros de la FEM, que incluía características demográficas y clínicas de los sujetos, junto con la evaluación del impacto de la pandemia en la esfera física, social y psicológica. Resultados. Se han analizado un total de 202 encuestas. La edad media de los participantes ha sido de 49,09 años. Un 77,8% presenta EM, mientras que un 22,2% tiene otras patologías. Los síntomas físicos que han aparecido más frecuentemente han sido debilidad muscular, pérdida de equilibrio y fatiga. La población estudiada se ha mantenido activa durante el confinamiento. Más de la mitad no refiere aumento en los síntomas cognitivos, pero sí que aparece, a nivel emocional, un aumento de la sensación de preocupación. Conclusiones. Podemos afirmar que las acciones desplegadas desde la FEM, para reducir las consecuencias del confinamiento, han sido efectivas y han bajado al máximo la aparición de conductas desadaptativas. El estudio también nos ha abierto la puerta a añadir nuevas líneas de intervención.


Subject(s)
Health Status , Life Style , Multiple Sclerosis/rehabilitation , Neurodegenerative Diseases/rehabilitation , Neurological Rehabilitation , Quarantine , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Self Report , Spain
7.
J Chin Med Assoc ; 85(1): 24-29, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1465265

ABSTRACT

Electrotherapy or electrical stimulation (ES) is a part of clinical intervention in the rehabilitation field. With rehabilitation intervention, electrotherapy may be provided as a treatment for pain relief, strengthening, muscle education, wound recovery, or functional training. Although these interventions may not be considered as the primary therapy for patients, the advantages of the ease of operation, lower costs, and lower risks render ES to be applied frequently in clinics. There have also been emerging ES tools for brain modulation in the past decade. ES interventions are not only considered analgesics but also as an important assistive therapy for motor improvement in orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation. In addition, during the coronavirus disease pandemic, lockdowns and self-quarantine policies have led to the discontinuation of orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation interventions. Therefore, the feasibility and effectiveness of home-based electrotherapy may provide opportunities for the prevention of deterioration or extension of the original therapy. The most common at-home applications in previous studies showed positive effects on pain relief, functional ES, muscle establishment, and motor training. Currently, there is a lack of certain products for at-home brain modulation; however, transcranial direct current stimulation has shown the potential of future home-based rehabilitation due to its relatively small and simple design. We have organized the features and applications of ES tools and expect the future potential of remote therapy during the viral pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Electric Stimulation Therapy/methods , Neurological Rehabilitation , Orthopedic Procedures , SARS-CoV-2 , Electric Stimulation Therapy/adverse effects , Humans , Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation , Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation
8.
Neurocrit Care ; 36(2): 357-371, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453884

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early neurorehabilitation improves outcomes in patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC) after brain injury, but its applicability in COVID-19 is unknown. We describe our experience implementing an early neurorehabilitation protocol for patients with COVID-19-associated DoC in the intensive care unit (ICU) and evaluate factors associated with recovery. METHODS: During the initial COVID-19 surge in New York City between March 10 and May 20, 2020, faced with a disproportionately high number of ICU patients with prolonged unresponsiveness, we developed and implemented an early neurorehabilitation protocol, applying standard practices from brain injury rehabilitation care to the ICU setting. Twenty-one patients with delayed recovery of consciousness after severe COVID-19 participated in a pilot early neurorehabilitation program that included serial Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R) assessments, multimodal treatment, and access to clinicians specializing in brain injury medicine. We retrospectively compared clinical features of patients who did and did not recover to the minimally conscious state (MCS) or better, defined as a CRS-R total score (TS) ≥ 8, before discharge. We additionally examined factors associated with best CRS-R TS, last CRS-R TS, hospital length of stay, and time on mechanical ventilation. RESULTS: Patients underwent CRS-R assessments a median of six (interquartile range [IQR] 3-10) times before discharge, beginning a median of 48 days (IQR 40-55) from admission. Twelve (57%) patients recovered to MCS after a median of 8 days (IQR 2-14) off continuous sedation; they had lower body mass index (p = 0.009), lower peak serum C-reactive protein levels (p = 0.023), higher minimum arterial partial pressure of oxygen (p = 0.028), and earlier fentanyl discontinuation (p = 0.018). CRS-R scores fluctuated over time, and the best CRS-R TS was significantly higher than the last CRS-R TS (median 8 [IQR 5-23] vs. 5 [IQR 3-18], p = 0.002). Earlier fentanyl (p = 0.001) and neuromuscular blockade (p = 0.015) discontinuation correlated with a higher last CRS-R TS. CONCLUSIONS: More than half of our cohort of patients with prolonged unresponsiveness following severe COVID-19 recovered to MCS or better before hospital discharge, achieving a clinical benchmark known to have relatively favorable long-term prognostic implications in DoC of other etiologies. Hypoxia, systemic inflammation, sedation, and neuromuscular blockade may impact diagnostic assessment and prognosis, and fluctuations in level of consciousness make serial assessments essential. Early neurorehabilitation of these patients in the ICU can be accomplished but is associated with unique challenges. Further research should evaluate factors associated with longer-term neurologic recovery and benefits of early rehabilitation in patients with severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurological Rehabilitation , COVID-19/complications , Consciousness , Consciousness Disorders/etiology , Humans , Recovery of Function , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
9.
Neurorehabil Neural Repair ; 35(12): 1076-1087, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443762

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Therapeutic dancing can be beneficial for people living with Parkinson's disease (PD), yet community-based classes can be difficult to access. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and impact of online therapeutic dancing classes for people in the early to mid-stages of PD. METHODS: Co-produced with people living with PD, physiotherapists, dance teachers and the local PD association, the 'ParkinDANCE' program was adapted to enable online delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants completed 8 one-hour sessions of online therapeutic dancing. Each person was assigned their own dance teacher and together they selected music for the classes. A mixed-methods design enabled analysis of feasibility and impact. Feasibility was quantified by attendance and adverse events. Impact was determined from individual narratives pertaining to consumer experiences and engagement, analysed with qualitative methods through a phenomenological lens. RESULTS: Attendance was high, with people attending 100% sessions. There were no adverse events. Impact was illustrated by the key themes from the in-depth interviews: (i) a sense of achievement, enjoyment and mastery occurred with online dance; (ii) project co-design facilitated participant engagement; (iii) dance instructor capabilities, knowledge and skills facilitated positive outcomes; (iv) music choices were key; and (v) participants were able to quickly adapt to online delivery with support and resources. CONCLUSIONS: Online dance therapy was safe, feasible and perceived to be of benefit in this sample of early adopters. During the pandemic, it was a viable form of structured physical activity. For the future, online dance may afford benefits to health, well-being and social engagement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dance Therapy , Internet-Based Intervention , Neurological Rehabilitation , Parkinson Disease/rehabilitation , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Patient Satisfaction , Aged , Feasibility Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care
10.
PM R ; 14(2): 217-226, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442034

ABSTRACT

Neurologic manifestations associated with a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) diagnosis are common and often occur in severe and critically ill patients. In these patients, the neurologic symptoms are confounded by critical care conditions, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Patients with dual diagnoses of COVID-19 and neurologic changes such as myopathy, polyneuropathy, and stroke are likely at a higher risk of experiencing deficits with swallowing, communication, and/or cognition. Speech-language pathologists are an integral part of both the critical care and neurologic disorders multi-disciplinary teams, offering valuable contributions in the evaluation, treatment, and management of these areas. Patients in intensive care units (ICUs) who require mechanical ventilation often experience difficulty with communication and benefit from early speech-language pathology intervention to identify the most efficient communication methods with the medical team and caregivers. Moreover, patients with neurologic manifestations may present with cognitive-linguistic impairments such as aphasia, thereby increasing the need for communication-based interventions. Difficulties with voice and swallowing after extubation are common, often requiring frequent treatment sessions, possibly persisting beyond ICU discharge. After leaving the ICU, patients with COVID-19 often experience physical, cognitive, and mental health impairments collectively called post-intensive care syndrome. This is often a lengthy road as they progress toward full recovery, requiring continued speech-language pathology treatment after hospital discharge, capitalizing on the principles of neuroplasticity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurological Rehabilitation , Speech-Language Pathology , Critical Care , Humans , Neuronal Plasticity , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
11.
World Neurosurg ; 156: 28-32, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401929

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had widespread consequences on health care systems around the world. It resulted in extensive changes to the referral patterns, management, and rehabilitation of surgical conditions. We aimed to evaluate the effect the COVID-19 pandemic has had on traumatic brain injury (TBI) specifically. We reviewed the literature published on COVID-19 and TBI referrals, management, and rehabilitation. Significant changes were seen in the referral patterns of TBIs worldwide, explained by changes in societal behaviors and changes in the mechanism of injury. Implementation of strict infection control measures and COVID-19 screening was commonplace, with some reporting changes to operating room protocols. TBI was more likely to be conservatively managed. Rehabilitation services were restricted, with a greater shift towards telemedicine to provide rehabilitative therapy remotely.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic , COVID-19 , Neurological Rehabilitation/methods , Neurological Rehabilitation/trends , Referral and Consultation/trends , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends
12.
13.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(7)2020 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291917
14.
Nervenarzt ; 91(12): 1122-1129, 2020 Dec.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717932

ABSTRACT

Neurological and neurosurgical early rehabilitation patients are often so critically ill that they must be weaned from mechanical ventilation in addition to early rehabilitative treatment. The German Society for Neurorehabilitation (DGNR) carried out a survey and asked neurological weaning units to provide information on structural characteristics of the facility, including personnel and technical resources and the number of cases and outcome based on anonymous data. In total 36 weaning units from 11 federal states with a total of 496 beds participated in the survey. From 2516 weaning cases documented in 2019, 2097 (83.3%) could primarily be successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation and only 120 (4.8%) had to be discharged with home ventilation. The mortality in this sample was 11.0% (n = 276). The results of the survey demonstrate that prolonged weaning during early neurological and neurosurgical rehabilitation is an important and effective component of healthcare provision for critically ill patients in Germany.


Subject(s)
Neurological Rehabilitation , Germany , Health Resources , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , Treatment Outcome , Ventilator Weaning
15.
Dev Med Child Neurol ; 63(4): 370-371, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165900
16.
Spinal Cord Ser Cases ; 7(1): 13, 2021 02 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081887

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: An online survey. OBJECTIVES: To follow-up with and re-query the international spinal cord community's response to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic by revisiting questions posed in a previous survey and investigating new lines of inquiry. SETTING: An international collaboration of authors and participants. METHODS: Two identical surveys (one in English and one in Spanish) were distributed via the internet. Responses from both surveys were pooled and analyzed for demographic and response data. RESULTS: Three hundred and sixty-six respondents were gathered from multiple continents and regions. The majority (63.1%) were rehabilitation physicians and only 12.1% had patients with spinal cord injury/disease (SCI/D) that they knew had COVID-19. Participants reported that the COVID-19 pandemic had caused limited access to clinician and support services and worsening medical complications. Nearly 40% of inpatient clinicians reported that "some or all" of their facilities' beds were being used by medical and surgical patients, rather than by individuals requiring inpatient rehabilitation. Respondents reported a 25.1% increase in use of telemedicine during the pandemic (35% used it before; 60.1% during), though over 60% felt the technology incompletely met their patients' needs. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted the ability of individuals with SCI/D to obtain their "usual level of care." Moving forward into a potential "second wave" of COVID-19, patient advocacy and efforts to secure access to thorough and accessible care are essential.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Neurological Rehabilitation/statistics & numerical data , Spinal Cord Injuries/rehabilitation , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Physicians/statistics & numerical data
20.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 102(3): 549-555, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-951019

ABSTRACT

Rehabilitation after significant acquired brain injury (ABI) to address complex independent activities of daily living and return to family and community life is offered primarily after initial hospitalization in outpatient day treatment, group home, skilled nursing, and residential settings and in the home and community of the person served. The coronavirus 2019 pandemic threatened access to care and the health and safety of staff, persons served, and families in these settings. This article describes steps taken to contain this threat by 7 leading posthospital ABI rehabilitation organizations. Outpatient and day treatment facilities were temporarily suspended. In other settings, procedures for isolation, transportation, cleaning, exposure control, infection control, and use of personal protective equipment (PPE) were reinforced with staff. Visitation and community activities were restricted. Staff and others required to enter facilities were screened with symptom checklists and temperature checks. Individuals showing symptoms of infection were quarantined and tested, as possible. New admissions were carefully screened for infection and often initially quarantined. Telehealth played a major role in reducing direct interpersonal contact while continuing to provide services both to outpatients and within facilities. Salary, benefits, training, and managerial support were enhanced for staff. Despite early outbreaks, these procedures were generally effective, with preliminary initial infections rates of only 1.1% for persons served and 2.1% for staff. Reductions in admissions, services, and unanticipated expenses (eg, PPE, more frequent and thorough cleaning) had a major negative financial effect. Providers continue to be challenged to adapt rehabilitative approaches and to reopen services.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries/rehabilitation , COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Neurological Rehabilitation/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Activities of Daily Living , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL