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1.
J Child Neurol ; 37(2): 127-132, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1602856

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study was designed to assess current recommendations from child neurologists and epileptologists on masking for school-age children with epilepsy. METHODS: A 7-item survey was created and sent out to members of the Child Neurology Society and Pediatric Epilepsy Research Consortium in August of 2021 to assess current practice and provider recommendations on masking. RESULTS: One hundred four individuals participated with representation from all regions of the United States. Masking was recommended by 95.1%, with 63.4% (n = 66) noting exception of those with severe intellectual disability, autism, and behavioral problems. Of those who write exemption letters, 54% write these <5% of the time. Only 3% reported potential adverse events associated with masking. CONCLUSION: Nearly all respondents recommended masking for school-age children with epilepsy. Potential risks of masking and adverse events were low. Improved guidance on masking is needed to ensure academic success of our patients with epilepsy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Epilepsy/physiopathology , Health Care Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Child , Consensus , Humans , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , SARS Virus , United States
2.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 92: 41-45, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472127

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The initial COVID-19 pandemic shutdown led to the canceling of elective surgeries throughout most of the USA and Canada. OBJECTIVE: This survey was carried out on behalf of the Parkinson Study Group (PSG) to understand the impact of the shutdown on deep brain stimulation (DBS) practices in North America. METHODS: A survey was distributed through RedCap® to the members of the PSG Functional Neurosurgical Working Group. Only one member from each site was asked to respond to the survey. Responses were collected from May 15 to June 6, 2020. RESULTS: Twenty-three sites participated; 19 (83%) sites were from the USA and 4 (17%) from Canada. Twenty-one sites were academic medical centers. COVID-19 associated DBS restrictions were in place from 4 to 16 weeks. One-third of sites halted preoperative evaluations, while two-thirds of the sites offered limited preoperative evaluations. Institutional policy was the main contributor for the reported practice changes, with 87% of the sites additionally reporting patient-driven surgical delays secondary to pandemic concerns. Pre-post DBS associated management changes affected preoperative assessments 96%; electrode placement 87%; new implantable pulse generator (IPG) placement 83%; IPG replacement 65%; immediate postoperative DBS programming 74%; and routine DBS programming 91%. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic related shutdown resulted in DBS practice changes in almost all North American sites who responded to this large survey. Information learned could inform development of future contingency plans to reduce patient delays in care under similar circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Deep Brain Stimulation/statistics & numerical data , Implantable Neurostimulators/statistics & numerical data , Movement Disorders/therapy , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Postoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers , Canada , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgeons/statistics & numerical data , United States
3.
J Immunother Cancer ; 9(7)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318086

ABSTRACT

Expanding the US Food and Drug Administration-approved indications for immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with cancer has resulted in therapeutic success and immune-related adverse events (irAEs). Neurologic irAEs (irAE-Ns) have an incidence of 1%-12% and a high fatality rate relative to other irAEs. Lack of standardized disease definitions and accurate phenotyping leads to syndrome misclassification and impedes development of evidence-based treatments and translational research. The objective of this study was to develop consensus guidance for an approach to irAE-Ns including disease definitions and severity grading. A working group of four neurologists drafted irAE-N consensus guidance and definitions, which were reviewed by the multidisciplinary Neuro irAE Disease Definition Panel including oncologists and irAE experts. A modified Delphi consensus process was used, with two rounds of anonymous ratings by panelists and two meetings to discuss areas of controversy. Panelists rated content for usability, appropriateness and accuracy on 9-point scales in electronic surveys and provided free text comments. Aggregated survey responses were incorporated into revised definitions. Consensus was based on numeric ratings using the RAND/University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method with prespecified definitions. 27 panelists from 15 academic medical centers voted on a total of 53 rating scales (6 general guidance, 24 central and 18 peripheral nervous system disease definition components, 3 severity criteria and 2 clinical trial adjudication statements); of these, 77% (41/53) received first round consensus. After revisions, all items received second round consensus. Consensus definitions were achieved for seven core disorders: irMeningitis, irEncephalitis, irDemyelinating disease, irVasculitis, irNeuropathy, irNeuromuscular junction disorders and irMyopathy. For each disorder, six descriptors of diagnostic components are used: disease subtype, diagnostic certainty, severity, autoantibody association, exacerbation of pre-existing disease or de novo presentation, and presence or absence of concurrent irAE(s). These disease definitions standardize irAE-N classification. Diagnostic certainty is not always directly linked to certainty to treat as an irAE-N (ie, one might treat events in the probable or possible category). Given consensus on accuracy and usability from a representative panel group, we anticipate that the definitions will be used broadly across clinical and research settings.


Subject(s)
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions/diagnosis , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/adverse effects , Immunotherapy/adverse effects , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Consensus , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/chemically induced , Nervous System Diseases/immunology , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Oncologists/statistics & numerical data , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/statistics & numerical data
4.
Seizure ; 86: 60-67, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065593

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of ongoing COVID-19 pandemic on epilepsy care in India. METHODS: We conducted a three-part survey comprising neurologists, people with epilepsy (PWE), and 11 specialized epilepsy centers across India. We sent two separate online survey questionnaires to Indian neurologists and PWE to assess the epilepsy practice, seizures control, and access to care during the COVID-19 pandemic. We collected and compared the data concerning the number of PWE cared for and epilepsy procedures performed during the 6 months periods preceding and following COVID-19 lockdown from epilepsy centers. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 453 neurologists and 325 PWE. One third of the neurologist reported >50 % decline in outdoor visits by PWE and EEG recordings. The cumulative data from 11 centers showed 65-70 % decline in the number of outdoor patients, video-EEG monitoring, and epilepsy surgery. Working in a hospital admitting COVID-19 patients and use of teleconsultation correlated with this decline. Half of PWE had postponed their planned outpatient visits and EEG. Less than 10 % of PWE missed their antiseizure medicines (ASM) or had seizures due to the nonavailability of ASM. Seizure control remained unchanged or improved in 92 % PWE. Half of the neurologists started using teleconsultation during the pandemic. Only 4% of PWE were afflicted with COVID-19 infection. CONCLUSIONS: Despite significant decline in the number of PWE visiting hospitals, their seizure control and access to ASMs were not affected during the COVID-19 pandemic in India. Risk of COVID-19 infection in PWE is similar to general population.


Subject(s)
Anticonvulsants/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Epilepsy/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Special/statistics & numerical data , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Outpatients/statistics & numerical data , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Electroencephalography/statistics & numerical data , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Female , Health Care Surveys , Humans , India/epidemiology , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
5.
Neurology ; 95(23): 1061-1066, 2020 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067372

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak on neurology resident training in Italy. METHOD: We created a web-based survey regarding changes in clinical, research, and educational activity of neurology trainees in Italy during the COVID-19 pandemic and the preventive measures undertaken by local institutions to reduce the risk of contagion. RESULTS: Seventy-nine residents working in Italy completed the survey. A total of 87.3% of trainees reported a substantial reduction in their neurologic duties since COVID-19 appeared in Italy, and 17.8% were also recruited or volunteered for COVID-19-dedicated wards. Likewise, more than 60% of trainees experienced a reduction or interruption in research activity. As regards the perceived effect of the COVID-19 outbreak on their neurologic training, almost 70% of surveyed trainees believe that the COVID-19 pandemic had or will have a negative effect on their formation as neurologists, for different reasons. Furthermore, trainees reported a consistent exposure (69.6%) to confirmed positive COVID-19 cases at work, with divergent surveillance and preventive measures taken by local institutions. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the survey shows that the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy has had a subjective negative effect on neurology residents on didactics, clinical, and research training as well as training abroad. The COVID-19 outbreak poses many challenges to academic institutions and training programs, and addressing these issues promptly is crucial to ensure continued quality of trainees' neurologic education. Sharing solutions and ideas among the international neurologic community might help neurology training programs worldwide to better counteract these problems.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Neurology/education , Neurology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Health Services Research/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy , Male
7.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 48: 102702, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988913

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way to manage MS and NMOSD, not only concerning treatment, but also regarding social distance and the increasing use of telemedicine (TM) to minimize the risk of infection. Currently, there is no data regarding TM among MS and NMOSD South American experts. OBJECTIVE: To investigate TM experiences from South American MS and/or NMOSD experts in the follow-up of their patients focusing on TM. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed. 141 MS and/or NMOSD experts from Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Brazil were invited to answer an web-based survey. RESULTS: A total of 129 (91.48 %) experts completed the survey. Only 19.4% had experience in TM previous COVID-19 pandemic, while 79.8% are currently using TM, most using video call (52.3%). Using TM, 44.1% of the experts were able to perform neurological examination, 85.6% believed to be able to identify a relapse, 48.6% use Patient Determined Disease Steps and 38.7% kept using the conventional Expanded Disability Status Scale. CONCLUSION: Our survey demonstrates preparedness and responsiveness among South American MS and/or NMOSD experts.  Despite scarce prior TM experience, most experts felt confident to use TM as a new tool for monitoring their patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Neuromyelitis Optica/therapy , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Argentina , Brazil , Chile , Colombia , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Care Surveys/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
8.
Pediatr Neurol ; 116: 62-67, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-957346

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The past decades have seen a transformational shift in the understanding and treatment for neurological diseases affecting infants and children. These advances have been driven in part by the pediatric neurology physician-scientist workforce and its efforts. However, pediatric neurology research faces substantial challenges from internal and external forces including work-life balance demands, COVID-19 pandemic effects, and research funding. Understanding the impact of these challenges on the perceptions, planning, and careers of pediatric neurology physician-scientists is needed to guide the research mission. METHODS: Our objective was to survey the research challenges, goals, and priorities of pediatric neurologists. In 2020 we conducted a cross-sectional, 28-question survey emailed to 1,775 members of the Child Neurology Society. RESULTS: One hundred fifty-one individuals responded to the survey. Most respondents were grant investigators (52%) and conducted clinical research (69%). Research areas included epilepsy (23%), neurodevelopmental and autism (16%), neurocritical care and stroke (11%), neurogenetics and neurometabolics (9%), neonatal neurology (8%), and others. The most common funding source was the National Institutes of Health (37%). Shared major research concerns were funding, utilization of remote technology, overcoming disparities, natural history and multicenter studies, global neurology, and diversification of the research portfolio. Commitment to continuing and increasing research efforts was evident. CONCLUSIONS: Our survey demonstrates obstacles for physician-scientist researchers in pediatric neurology, but it also shows optimism about continued opportunity. Creative approaches to address challenges will benefit the research mission, maximize the current and future pool of researchers, and help improve the lives of children with neurological disorders.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Pediatricians/statistics & numerical data , Research Personnel/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Optimism , Societies, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workforce
9.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 40(3): 346-355, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638000

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, telehealth modalities have come to prominence as a strategy for providing patient care when in-person care provision opportunities are limited. The degree of adoption by neuro-ophthalmologists has not been quantified. METHODS: Telehealth utilization pre-COVID-19 and peri-COVID-19 was surveyed among practicing neuro-ophthalmologists in and outside the United States using an online platform. Demographics, perceived benefits, barriers, and utility for different neuro-ophthalmic conditions were collected. Data collection occurred over a 2-week period in May 2020. RESULTS: Two hundred eight practicing neuro-ophthalmologists (81.3% United States, 50.2% females, age range <35 to >65, mode 35-44 years) participated in the survey. Utilization of all telehealth modalities increased from pre-COVID to peri-COVID (video visit 3.9%-68.3%, P < 0.0005, remote interpretation of testing 26.7%-32.2%, P = 0.09, online second opinion 7.9%-15.3%, P = 0.001, and interprofessional e-consult 4.4%-18.7%, P < 0.0005, McNemar). The majority selected access, continuity, and patient efficiency of care as benefits and data quality as a barrier. Telehealth was felt to be most helpful for conditions relying on history, external examination, and previously collected ancillary testing and not helpful for conditions requiring funduscopic examination. CONCLUSIONS: Telehealth modality usage by neuro-ophthalmologists increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Identified benefits have relevance both during and beyond COVID-19. Further work is needed to address barriers in their current and future states to maintain these modalities as viable care delivery options.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Facilities and Services Utilization/organization & administration , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Adult , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Female , Health Care Surveys , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
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