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3.
Brain Connect ; 12(4): 299-301, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2160877

Subject(s)
Neurology , Neurosciences , Brain , Humans
4.
Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) ; 68(10): 1376-1382, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140984

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to characterize teleconsultations in neurology executed by Regula+Brasil project in Recife, a capital city in northeastern Brazil. METHODS: A descriptive study carried out by four private hospitals, in a partnership with the Ministry of Health in Brazil. Teleconsultation was performed preferably in the video modality. Conditions eligible for teleconsultation were headache, epilepsy, and cerebrovascular disorders. Period of analysis was May to September 2020. RESULTS: A total of 243 teleconsultations were analyzed, of which 76.95% was a first appointment. In 48.97% of cases, the teleconsultation represented the first opportunity for the patient to be consulted with the specialist. Among cases of first appointment, 20.16% were further referred to a face-to-face consultation and 21.81% could be redirected to primary health care. Headache disorders were the most predominant clinical conditions. CONCLUSIONS: The implementation and development of telemedicine by Regula+Brasil during the COVID-19 pandemic represented an opportunity to assess the value of having teleconsultations added along the line of care from primary care to a medical specialty, promoting the coordination of care across different levels of complexity of care in the health system and improving access to specialized care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurology , Remote Consultation , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics
5.
Semin Neurol ; 42(1): 18-30, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133777

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine is a rapidly growing field of medicine due to a combination of high-speed global telecommunication systems and accessibility of small, fast mobile computing platforms with bidirectional audiovisual camera capabilities. Teleneurology is a subset of telemedicine. TeleNeuroICU, one form of teleneurology, is the practice of virtually consulting on patients in the ICU setting with neurological and neurosurgical conditions. Given the current and future shortage of neurologists and neurointensivists, there is a high demand for TeleNeuroICU services around the globe and this is expected to increase in the future. This review summarizes the state of the art around the TeleNeuroICU practice for practitioners in the field, emerging research in this area, and new technologies and integrations that enhance the value of TeleNeuroICU to health care systems.


Subject(s)
Neurology , Telemedicine , Humans , Referral and Consultation
6.
J Neurol ; 269(9): 5022-5037, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820660

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify factors that patients consider when choosing between future in-person, video, or telephone visits. BACKGROUND: Telemedicine has been rapidly integrated into ambulatory neurology in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Ambulatory neurology patients at a single center were contacted via telephone to complete: (1) a survey quantifying likelihood of scheduling a future telemedicine visit, and (2) a semi-structured qualitative interview following their visit in March 2021. Data were processed using the principles of thematic analysis. RESULTS: Of 2493 visits, 39% assented to post-visit feedback; 74% were in-person visits and 13% video and telephone. Patients with in-person visits were less likely than those with video and telephone visits to "definitely" consider a future telemedicine visit (36 vs. 59 and 62%, respectively; p < 0.001). Patients considered five key factors when scheduling future visits: "Pros of Visit Type," "Barriers to Telemedicine," "Situational Context," "Inherent Beliefs," and "Extrinsic Variables." Patients with telemedicine visits considered convenience as a pro, while those with in-person visits cited improved quality of care. Accessibility and user familiarity were considered barriers to telemedicine by patients with in-person and telephone visits, whereas system limitations were prevalent among patients with video visits. Patients agreed that stable conditions can be monitored via telemedicine, whereas physical examination warrants an in-person visit. Telemedicine was inherently considered equivalent to in-person care by patients with telephone visits. Awareness of telemedicine must be improved for patients with in-person visits. CONCLUSION: Across visit types, patients agree that telemedicine is convenient and effective in many circumstances. Future care delivery models should incorporate the patient perspective to implement hybrid models where telemedicine is an adjunct to in-person visits in ambulatory neurology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurology , Telemedicine , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics
7.
Arq Neuropsiquiatr ; 80(5 Suppl 1): 1-6, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065214

ABSTRACT

Training of neurologists for the near future is a challenge due to the likely advances in neuroscientific methods, which will change much of our knowledge on diagnosis and treatment of neurological diseases. OBJECTIVE: to comment on what may be more likely to be a constant in the very near future and to recommend how to prepare the neurologist for the 21st century. METHODS: through a critical review of recent articles on the teaching of Neurology, to present a personal view on the subject. RESULTS: Diagnostic methods and therapeutic resources in Neurology will be greatly improved, but the central core of teaching young neurologists will continue to be the clinical/anatomical correlation. The neurologist must be prepared to be the primary physician in the care of patients with neurological disorders, although the roles of consultant and clinical neuroscientist must also be considered. In addition to technical knowledge, the neurologist must be prepared to discuss not only distressing issues related to the specialty, such as the risks of genetic diseases for family members of their patients, the inexorable progression of some diseases and the need for palliative care, but also problems not directly related to Neurology that cause anxiety and depression in the patient or that are the main reason for the initial consultation. CONCLUSION: neurology will be an even more important area of medicine and the neurologist must be well prepared to be the primary doctor to diagnose, treat and follow the patient with neurological disorders. In addition to technical knowledge, training in doctor-patient relations should be highlighted.


Subject(s)
Nervous System Diseases , Neurology , Anxiety , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Neurologists , Neurology/history
8.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(10): 3736-3737, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055721
9.
Eur Psychiatry ; 65(1): e59, 2022 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054016

ABSTRACT

We aimed to determine the role of the European Psychiatric Association (EPA) and the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) in the management of post-COVID conditions. This is a joint statement from the EAN and the EPA on post-COVID. It is published in the official journals of the two associations, the European Journal of Neurology and European Psychiatry.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurology , Psychiatry , Humans
11.
JAMA Neurol ; 79(1): 7-8, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041191
13.
J Neurooncol ; 156(1): 11-13, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1995574

ABSTRACT

The Focused Ultrasound Foundation was created to improve the lives of millions of people worldwide by accelerating the development of this noninvasive technology. The Foundation works to clear the path to global adoption by organizing and funding research, fostering collaboration, and building awareness among patients and professionals. Since its establishment in 2006, the Foundation has become the largest nongovernmental source of funding for focused ultrasound research. For more information, visit http://www.fusfoundation.org .


Subject(s)
Medical Oncology , Neurology , Ultrasonic Therapy , Diffusion of Innovation , Humans , Ultrasonic Therapy/methods
15.
Arq Neuropsiquiatr ; 80(5 Suppl 1): 336-341, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993574

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine develops from technology that offers opportunities for knowledge transfer and information sharing and allows the provision of health services at a distance. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the number of publications on teleneurology in the last two decades in PubMed and the available evidence on the use of this technology in neurological clinical conditions. METHODS: A quantitative assessment of publications related to telemedicine and neurology in the last two decades. A search was performed on the PubMed database for the descriptors ("Telemedicine"[Mesh]) AND "Neurology"[Mesh]). A review of the articles retrieved on the topic was carried out to evaluate the innovation processes used and applications in various clinical conditions involving teleneurology. RESULTS: The search performed on March 14th 2022 resulted in 229 publications involving the topic of telemedicine and neurology between 1999 and 2022. Since 2000, there has been an increase in publications related to this topic, with a peak of 71 articles published in 2020, the year in which the World Health Organization defined the COVID-19 pandemic status. CONCLUSION: In the last two decades, teleneurology has been developing through the expansion of technological resources and the COVID-19 pandemic intensified this process. Different modalities of teleneurology are studied in several neurology subfields and include teleconsultation (between healthcare professionals or between healthcare professionals and patients), telerehabilitation, telemonitoring and tele-education. The advances achieved by teleneurology in this period encouraged technological innovations and health processes that developed opportunities to improve the care provided in a mechanism of constant evolution.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nervous System Diseases , Neurology , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods
16.
J Neurol Sci ; 441: 120355, 2022 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966868

ABSTRACT

"Long-COVID" is a clinical entity that consists of persisting post-infectious symptoms that last for more than three months after the onset of the first acute COVID-19 symptoms. Among these, a cluster of neurological persisting symptoms defines Neuro-Long-COVID. While the debate about the pathogenesis of Long-COVID is still ongoing, sex differences have been individuated for both the acute and the chronic stage of the infection. We conducted a retrospective study describing sex differences in a large sample of patients with Neuro-Long-COVID. Demographic and clinical data were collected in a specifically designed Neuro-Long-Covid outpatient service. Our sample included 213 patients: 151 were females and 62 were males; the mean age was similar between females (53 y, standard deviation 14) and males (55 y, standard deviation 15); no significant differences was present between the demographic features across the two groups. Despite the prevalence of the specific chronic symptoms between male and females showed no significant differences, the total number of females accessing our service was higher than that of males, confirming the higher prevalence of Neuro-Long-COVID in female individuals. Conversely, a worse acute phase response in males rather than females was confirmed by a significant difference in the rates of acute respiratory symptoms (p = 0.008), dyspnea (p = 0.018), respiratory failure (p = 0.010) and the consequent need for ventilation (p = 0.015), together with other acute symptoms such as palpitations (p = 0.049), headache (p = 0.001) and joint pain (p = 0.049). Taken together, these findings offer a subgroup analysis based on sex-dependent characteristics, which can support a tailored-medicine approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Characteristics
17.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 25(7): 1061-1068, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1954419

ABSTRACT

Background: Affinity of coronavirus disease to the central nervous system is not well known. Aim: We aimed to share the data of COVID-19 patients with neurological complaints in a pandemia hospital. Material and Method: Consultation results requested from the neurology clinic of Konya Meram State Hospital were retrospectively examined. PCR test positive patients, PCR negative patients with positive clinical, laboratory and radiological findings with COVID-19 were evaluated. Age, gender, history of neurological diseases, and neurological symptoms were recorded. Results: The reason for consultation was acute neurological symptom in 96 (84.2%) patients, counseling for treatment in chronic disease in 15 (13.2%) patients, and worsening in chronic disease in 3 (2.6%) patients. As neurological disorders, 22 (19.3%) had a history of previous stroke, 10 (8.8%) had dementia, 4 (3.5%) had epilepsy, 4 (3.5%) had Parkinson's disease, 3 (2.6%) had multiple sclerosis, 2 (1.8%) had myasthenia graves, and 1 (0.9%) had restless legs syndrome respectively. The most common reason for requesting consultation was changes in consciousness (56.1%). Of the 114 patients who requested neurology consultation, 65 (57%) were discharged, 49 (43%) were died. Conclusion: The change in consciousness was the reason in more than half of the patients who requested neurology consultation during COVID-19 follow-up. Impaired consciousness in a patient with COVID-19 may indicate a poor prognosis. If the studies planned in the near future can shed light on the cause of the unconsciousness developing in COVID-19, it will be promising in terms of treatment plans to reduce mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Neurology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epilepsy/diagnosis , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies
18.
Pract Neurol ; 22(4): 262-263, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1950256

Subject(s)
Neurology , Neurosurgery , Humans
20.
Neurology ; 96(22): 1032-1040, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933177

ABSTRACT

We describe a process of organizational strategic future forecasting, with a horizon of 2035, as implemented by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) on behalf of its members, and as a model approach for other organizations. The participants were members of the 2018-2020 AAN Boards of Directors and Executive Team, moderated by a consultant with expertise in future forecasting. Four predetermined model scenarios of import to our field (1 "expectable," 1 "challenging," and 2 "visionary") were discussed in small groups, with alternative scenarios developed in specific domains. Common themes emerged among all scenarios: the importance of thoughtful integration of biomedical and information technology tools into neurologic practice; continued demonstration of the value of neurologic care to society; and emphasis on population management and prevention of neurologic disease. Allowing for the inherent uncertainties of predicting the future, the AAN's integration of structured forecasting into its strategic planning process has allowed the organization to prepare more effectively for change, such as the disruptions stemming from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The approaches outlined here will be integrated into future AAN operations and may be implemented to a similar effect by other organizations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurology , Academies and Institutes , Forecasting , Humans , Societies, Medical , United States
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