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2.
Neurology ; 98(7): 279-286, 2022 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593693

ABSTRACT

The standard neurology clinical experience in medical school focuses primarily on bedside patient encounters; however, the limitations of the clinical environment due to the current COVID-19 pandemic have accelerated the need for virtual curriculum development. To provide guidance to Neurology clerkship directors during this unprecedented time, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Undergraduate Education Subcommittee (UES) formed a workgroup to develop an outline for a virtual curriculum, provide recommendations, and describe models of integrating virtual curricula into the neurology clerkship. In this overview, we discuss different methods of virtual instruction, hybrid models of clerkship training and the challenges to its implementation, professionalism issues, and modification of feedback and assessment techniques specific to the virtual learning environment. We also offer suggestions for implementation of a hybrid virtual curriculum into the neurology clerkship. The virtual curriculum is intended to supplement the core neurology in-person clinical experience and should not be used for shortening or replacing the required neurology clinical clerkship.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Clerkship , Education, Distance , Neurology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Clerkship/organization & administration , Curriculum , Education, Distance/methods , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Humans , Neurology/education , United States/epidemiology
3.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1899642, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574515

ABSTRACT

Background: During the current COVID-19 pandemic, offline clinical education was mandated to suspend at the neurology department of many teaching hospitals globally, yet there is insufficient evidence regarding the preferred practice and methods for online neurology intern training course.Objective: The investigation aimed to examine whether the online neurology training course based on Small Private Online Course (SPOC) and blending learning mode can achieve a good effect and cater for interns from different medical programs and whether the learning group size affects the teaching effect.Design: The subjects were 92 students enrolled in the neurology internship at the Second Xiangya Hospital of China from 9 March to 9 August 2020. After completing the online course, the final scores and evaluation results were compared among different groups of interns, and their preference to distinct contents of the course was analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS program (version 22.0).Results: Our online course received consistent positive recognition from the interns. Ninety-nine percent of the interns recommended incorporating the online course into the conventional offline training program after the pandemic. There was no significant difference between interns from different programs concerning the final scores and course evaluation. A smaller learning group size (<15 students) could achieve a better teaching effect than a larger group size (p < 0.05). The interns preferred interactive discussions, and course contents that they can get practice and feedback from, rather than video watching and didactic lectures.Conclusions: The online neurology intern training course based on SPOC and blending learning mode is worthy of popularization in a large student base. The teaching effect of an online intern training program may be improved by limiting the group size to less than 15 students and encouraging more interactive discussion, more practice and feedback.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Neurology/education , China/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Group Processes , Humans , Inservice Training , Learning , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Neurol Sci ; 43(3): 1503-1511, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1540229

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Neurology residents are particularly vulnerable to burnout because of the novel logistical and clinical challenges brought about by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Despite its implications, knowledge on burnout and its predictors among neurology residents is lacking. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of burnout among neurology residents during the pandemic, to compare burnout subscale scores and sociodemographic and work characteristics, and to explore residents' perceptions on how to address burnout. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey among all 120 residents from the nine institutions in the Philippines offering neurology residency programs from March to August 2020. We obtained sociodemographic and work characteristics using questionnaire. We measured burnout using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. We performed an inductive thematic analysis to analyze perceptions on how to reduce burnout. RESULTS: The response rate was 71.67% (86/120). The mean age was 30.1 ± 3.1 years. Using predefined subscale critical boundaries, the prevalence of burnout was 94% (95% CI 89, 99). The lack of compensation and number of on-duty days influenced emotional exhaustion scores. The number of on-duty days influenced depersonalization scores. Thematic analysis revealed five themes: increasing manpower; self-care; reducing clerical tasks; improving work environment; and adequate compensation. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of burnout among neurology residents during the COVID-19 pandemic was alarmingly high. Reforms in hiring policies, work-hour management, manpower organization, work environment, and logistics may be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Neurology , Adult , Burnout, Psychological , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Neurology/education , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 31(1): 106177, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525869

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, we instituted virtual inpatient stroke rounds and acute stroke evaluations via telemedicine in the emergency department. We sought to explore trainees' and experienced providers' views on stroke care and education. METHODS: The implementation and the survey took place at a single academic comprehensive stroke center in northeast Ohio in the United States. "Virtual rounding" consisted of patient presentation and discussion in the morning in on-line virtual team format followed by in-person patient rounds in small groups. Acute stroke evaluations in the emergency department included direct in-person evaluation by neurology residents with supervision over telemedicine.The neurology residents, stroke fellows, stroke nurse practitioners, and stroke staff physicians were surveyed 2 months after implementation. Quantitative data was analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis, written responses in comment sections were analyzed using content analysis. RESULTS: Thirty-two of 42 (73%) surveys were completed. Nine (45%) residents and 5 (42%) experienced providers responded that virtual rounds did not compromise learning and education on stroke service. Fifteen (75%) residents and all experienced providers agreed that virtual rounds protected caregivers from exposure to the virus. While more than a third of residents (37%) did not feel comfortable utilizing telemedicine in ED, the majority of experienced providers (89%) were at ease with it. A total of 58% of residents and 67% of experienced providers felt that they were spending less time at the bedside, and 42% of residents and 58% of experienced providers felt less connected to patients during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Majority of neurology residents' experience was not positive utilising telemedicine as compared to other staff providers. This is likely attributed to lack of prior exposure and unpreparedness. Incorporation of telemedicine curricula in medical school and residency training could prepare the next generation physicians to effectively use these technologies and meet the growing need for telehealth services for current and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Internship and Residency , Neurology/education , Stroke/therapy , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Physician-Patient Relations , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
6.
Neurology ; 98(1): 44-47, 2022 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468140

ABSTRACT

Interest in global health is increasing among neurology residents. However, funding, time, and, recently, COVID-19 travel restrictions remain barriers to widespread participation. To meet this need, we instituted virtual global neurology morning reports with the objectives of (1) improving knowledge about neurologic diseases common in sub-Saharan Africa and (2) developing clinical reasoning skills through consideration of diagnostic and therapeutic limitations in resource-limited settings. Interactive case-based sessions were presented from Zambia via videoconference by a Johns Hopkins faculty member or Zambian neurology trainee. An anonymous cross-sectional survey was conducted among Johns Hopkins neurology residents. Of eligible participants, 69% (n = 30) completed the survey, 66% of whom were female, and 33% reported prior in-person global health experience. Although most participants did not anticipate a career in global health, the majority (85%) reported that exposure to global health was important. All but 1 participant (96%) reported satisfaction with the global neurology morning reports, with 100% reporting that they were useful to their clinical knowledge and 86% reporting that they were useful to their clinical practice. All respondents felt that morning reports should continue, and 69% ranked the educational value of the experience in the top quartile of the residency curriculum. Resident satisfaction with and perceived utility of global neurology morning reports were high, although the majority did not plan to pursue global neurology opportunities as part of their career. Remote learning opportunities may increase interest in global health among neurology residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Neurology/education , Teaching Rounds , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Female , Humans , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Pediatr Neurol ; 126: 3-8, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447049

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic presented many challenges for graduate medical education, including the need to quickly implement virtual residency interviews. We investigated how different programs approached these challenges to determine best practices. METHODS: Surveys to solicit perspectives of program directors, program coordinators, and chief residents regarding virtual interviews were designed through an iterative process by two child neurology residency program directors. Surveys were distributed by email in May 2021. Results were summarized using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Responses were received from 35 program directors and 34 program coordinators from 76 programs contacted. Compared with the 2019-2020 recruitment season, in 2020-2021, 14 of 35 programs received >10% more applications and most programs interviewed ≥12 applicants per position. Interview days were typically five to six hours long and were often coordinated with pediatrics interviews. Most programs (13/15) utilized virtual social events with residents, but these often did not allow residents to provide quality feedback about applicants. Program directors could adequately assess most applicant qualities but felt that virtual interviews limited their ability to assess applicants' interpersonal communication skills and to showcase special features of their programs. Most respondents felt that a combination of virtual and in-person interviewing should be utilized in the future. CONCLUSIONS: Residency program directors perceived some negative impacts of virtual interviewing on their recruitment efforts but in general felt that virtual interviews adequately replaced in-person interviews for assessing applicants. Most programs felt that virtual interviewing should be utilized in the future.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Graduate , Internship and Residency , Interviews as Topic , Neurology/education , Pediatrics/education , Videoconferencing , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , School Admission Criteria , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 207: 106717, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252595

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine how neurology departments and residency programs in the United States used virtual communication to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic, we investigated the presence and use of social media pages, virtual outreach events, and virtual internship opportunities. METHODS: Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook accounts were identified (or noted as nonexistent) for 159 accredited neurology departments and residency programs. Google searches and social media site specific searches were performed. For existing pages, the date of creation was determined and all posts on and after March 1st, 2020, were assessed to investigate the presence of virtual open house advertisements. Each program was also assessed for virtual sub-internship and elective opportunities on the Visiting Student Application Service (VSAS). RESULTS: A majority of neurology residency programs (110) had a social media presence, particularly on Twitter and Instagram. Most residency program Twitter and Instagram accounts were created after March 1st, 2020, and this was not the case on Facebook. Twitter and Instagram were used most to advertise virtual opportunities. A correlation was observed between presence and number of social media accounts and program prestige. Few programs offered virtual opportunities on VSAS for the 2020-2021 year. CONCLUSION: Neurology residency programs adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic by creating residency social media accounts, primarily on Instagram and Twitter, and hosting virtual informational events. We recommend that neurology residency applicants create professional Instagram and Twitter accounts to network with programs and receive updates about virtual events. Similarly, going forward, we recommend continued social media use by neurology residency programs for applicant outreach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/trends , Neurology/education , Neurology/trends , Social Media/trends , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Job Application , Retrospective Studies , United States
10.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3221-3222, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242161
11.
Rev Neurol ; 72(9): 307-312, 2021 05 01.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206625

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND AIM: COVID-19 pandemic has disturbed many hospital activities, including medical education. We describe the switch from in-person didactic sessions to videoconferencing in a Neurology department. We analyse the opinions and satisfaction of participants. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Narrative description of the adopted measures; Online survey among participants. RESULTS: One of the three weekly sessions was cancelled, and two switched to videoconferencing. There were more participants online than in the conference hall. 49 users answered the survey, 51% women, mean age 40.5 years (range 25-65). Satisfaction was higher for previous face-to-face meetings (8.68) than for videoconferencing (8.12) (p=0.006). There was a significant inverse correlation between age and satisfaction with virtual sessions (r=-0.37; p=0.01), that was not found for in-person attendance. Most users (75.5%) would prefer to continue with online sessions when the pandemic is over, and 87.8% support inter-hospital remote meetings, but the safety of web platforms is a concern (53.1%). CONCLUSIONS: The change from in-person to virtual sessions is an easy measure to implement in a neurology department, with a good degree of satisfaction among users. There are some unsolved problems with the use of commercial web platforms and inter-hospital connection. Most users recommend leadership and support from educational and health authorities.


TITLE: Cambio de sesiones docentes presenciales a virtuales durante la pandemia de COVID-19 en un servicio de neurología: descripción del proceso y satisfacción de los usuarios.Introducción y objetivo. La pandemia de COVID-19 ha trastornado la actividad hospitalaria, incluyendo la docente. Se describe el cambio de un sistema presencial a otro de sesiones en línea en un servicio de neurología, y se analizan la satisfacción y las opiniones de los usuarios. Material y métodos. Exposición de las medidas adoptadas para pasar a modalidad en línea y análisis de una encuesta entre los participantes. Resultados. Se pasó de tres a dos sesiones semanales, con restricción del público presencial. El público virtual superó al presencial. Contestaron la encuesta 49 participantes, un 51% mujeres, con una media de 40,5 años (rango: 25-65). La satisfacción de los asistentes fue mayor para las sesiones presenciales (8,68) que para las en línea (8,12) (p = 0,006). Existía una correlación inversa significativa entre la edad y la satisfacción con las sesiones en línea (r = ­0,37; p = 0,01) que no se daba para las sesiones presenciales. El 75,5% fue partidario de mantener las sesiones virtuales cuando se eliminaran las restricciones de aforo. Una mayoría (87,8%) apoyó sesiones interhospitalarias y recomienda que las autoridades sanitarias faciliten aplicaciones informáticas seguras (53,1%). Conclusiones. La introducción de sesiones virtuales es una medida fácil de implementar en un servicio de neurología, con un alto grado de satisfacción de los usuarios, aunque menor que con las sesiones presenciales. Existen problemas no resueltos respecto al uso de plataformas comerciales y conexión interhospitalaria. Sería recomendable que las autoridades sanitarias y educativas desarrollaran aplicaciones seguras y fomentaran la educación médica en línea.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Behavior , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Neurology/education , Pandemics , Videoconferencing , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospital Departments , Hospitals, University , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Middle Aged , Neurologists/education , Neurologists/psychology , Patient Handoff , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Videoconferencing/instrumentation , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data
13.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc9, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110230

ABSTRACT

Situation: The COVID-19 pandemic made the traditional bedside teaching inaccessible for medical students. Problem: Within a short period of time, established bedside teaching concepts had to be converted into online formats to meet the requirements of the health authorities. Approach: The Department of Neurology at the University Hospital Essen transformed the examination course in the 5th clinical semester into a live stream, taking into account data protection guidelines. This enabled students to participate from a distance, allowing them to take the medical history from a patient and to interact with the medical examiners. Thus, this concept goes beyond the video-based formats of the examination course. Optimization: During the course, we performed online evaluations to ensure an immediate feedback from the students. This enabled us to implement ongoing changes that had a positive impact on the course format, for example using better equipment to ensure a better video and audio quality. In the future, we hope to create a clinic's own online channel to further increase data security.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Neurologic Examination/methods , Neurology/education , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Neurology ; 95(23): 1061-1066, 2020 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067372

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak on neurology resident training in Italy. METHOD: We created a web-based survey regarding changes in clinical, research, and educational activity of neurology trainees in Italy during the COVID-19 pandemic and the preventive measures undertaken by local institutions to reduce the risk of contagion. RESULTS: Seventy-nine residents working in Italy completed the survey. A total of 87.3% of trainees reported a substantial reduction in their neurologic duties since COVID-19 appeared in Italy, and 17.8% were also recruited or volunteered for COVID-19-dedicated wards. Likewise, more than 60% of trainees experienced a reduction or interruption in research activity. As regards the perceived effect of the COVID-19 outbreak on their neurologic training, almost 70% of surveyed trainees believe that the COVID-19 pandemic had or will have a negative effect on their formation as neurologists, for different reasons. Furthermore, trainees reported a consistent exposure (69.6%) to confirmed positive COVID-19 cases at work, with divergent surveillance and preventive measures taken by local institutions. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the survey shows that the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy has had a subjective negative effect on neurology residents on didactics, clinical, and research training as well as training abroad. The COVID-19 outbreak poses many challenges to academic institutions and training programs, and addressing these issues promptly is crucial to ensure continued quality of trainees' neurologic education. Sharing solutions and ideas among the international neurologic community might help neurology training programs worldwide to better counteract these problems.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Neurology/education , Neurology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Health Services Research/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy , Male
15.
Neurol Sci ; 42(3): 817-823, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028429

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is having a huge impact on clinical activity of all hospitals, including the ones involved in training of residents. In addition, neurology residents underwent substantial modifications of their training program. Aim of our investigation was to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the educational activities of Italian neurology residents through an online questionnaire delivered to neurology residents. The results obtained showed that almost 30% of the respondents were redistributed to COVID-19 units. Neurology departments underwent substantial modifications of their organization influencing clinical educational activities; lessons and seminars were rescheduled online and research protocols were stopped and transferred to remote working, when feasible. There was a relevant use of telemedicine approach even if most of the respondents had never been trained before. Some of the changes had a North-South gradient, following the epidemiology of the pandemic. The data obtained from our survey highlight those points to address to be prepared for possible future emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Graduate/organization & administration , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Neurology/education , Adult , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Neurology ; 95(19): 883-886, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-982458

ABSTRACT

In-person resident didactics are traditionally limited to the faculty within a single institution. Tele-education efforts have been implemented in neurology to various degrees historically, but the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has necessitated a broad and immediate overhaul in neurology didactic training. To respond to the immediate need for resident didactics, we created a rapid onset, volunteer tele-education didactic series publicized on online forums to the American Academy of Neurology A.B. Baker Section via Synapse and the Women Neurologists Group via Facebook. We describe how, with just 1 week of lead time, we created an ongoing neurology lecture series featuring faculty from across the country lecturing on a diverse range of neurology topics. The series is ongoing and draws upwards of 120 residents per lecture. Tele-education offers unique benefits to enhance the education of all neurology trainees everywhere.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate , Neurology/education , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Neurology ; 95(13): 583-592, 2020 09 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-945310

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic epicenter in Bronx, NY, the Montefiore Neuroscience Center required rapid and drastic changes when considering the delivery of neurologic care, health and safety of staff, and continued education and safety for house staff. Health care leaders rely on principles that can be in conflict during a disaster response such as this pandemic, with equal commitments to ensure the best care for those stricken with COVID-19, provide high-quality care and advocacy for patients and families coping with neurologic disease, and advocate for the health and safety of health care teams, particularly house staff and colleagues who are most vulnerable. In our attempt to balance these principles, over 3 weeks, we reformatted our inpatient neuroscience services by reducing from 4 wards to just 1, in the following weeks delivering care to over 600 hospitalized patients with neuro-COVID and over 1,742 total neuroscience hospital bed days. This description from members of our leadership team provides an on-the-ground account of our effort to respond nimbly to a complex and evolving surge of patients with COVID in a large urban hospital network. Our efforts were based on (1) strategies to mitigate exposure and transmission, (2) protection of the health and safety of staff, (3) alleviation of logistical delays and strains in the system, and (4) facilitating coordinated communication. Each center's experience will add to knowledge of best practices, and emerging research will help us gain insights into an evidence-based approach to neurologic care during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Medical Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Neurology/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Ambulatory Care , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Communication , Delivery of Health Care , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Hospitalization , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Neurology/education , Neuroscience Nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Text Messaging
18.
J Neurol Sci ; 420: 117222, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-912373

ABSTRACT

There is considerable heterogeneity in residency education around the world. The Neurology International Residents Videoconference and Exchange (NIRVE) program aims to deliver neurology educational content to residents across different resource settings and countries through a monthly videoconferencing platform. Its purpose is to fill gaps in didactic teaching, increase exposure to a variety of cases including various practices and delivery of neurology in multiple countries, as well as integrate global health content into neurology education. NIRVE also facilitates resident exchanges among participating sites. In this descriptive article, we report NIRVE's structure and its cumulative productivity. Since its creation, NIRVE has held more than 90 videoconference rounds and has connected 16 sites in North America, South America, Europe, Asia and Africa. We describe challenges encountered since the inception of the program eleven years ago. NIRVE also fosters a culture of long-term international connection and collaboration. During global disease outbreaks, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, videoconference rounds serve as a sustainable alternative means to deliver education. Future goals include increasing the number of sites involved, including a focus on Africa and Asia, and fostering resident-led advocacy projects.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Inventions , Neurology/education , Videoconferencing , COVID-19 , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics , Telemedicine
20.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(1): 82-86, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873075

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is an international crisis placing tremendous strain on medical systems around the world. Like other specialties, neuroanesthesiology has been adversely affected and training programs have had to quickly adapt to the constantly changing environment. METHODS: An email-based survey was used to evaluate the effects of the pandemic on clinical workflow, clinical training, education, and trainee well-being. The impact of the International Council on Perioperative Neuroscience Training (ICPNT) accreditation was also assessed. RESULTS: Responses were received from 14 program directors (88% response rate) in 10 countries and from 36 fellows in these programs. Clinical training was adversely affected because of the cancellation of elective neurosurgery and other changes in case workflow, the introduction of modified airway and other protocols, and redeployment of trainees to other sites. To address educational demands, most programs utilized online platforms to organize clinical discussions, journal clubs, and provide safety training modules. Several initiatives were introduced to support trainee well-being during the pandemic. Feelings of isolation and despair among trainees varied from 2 to 8 (on a scale of 1 to 10). Fellows all reported concerns that their clinical training had been adversely affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic because of decreased exposure to elective subspecialty cases and limited opportunities to complete workplace-based assessments and training portfolio requirements. Cancellation of examination preparation courses and delayed examinations were cited as common sources of stress. Programs accredited by the ICPNT reported that international networking and collaboration was beneficial to reduce feelings of isolation during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Neuroanesthesia fellowship training program directors introduced innovative ways to maintain clinical training, educational activity and trainee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Accreditation/trends , Anesthesiology/education , Anesthesiology/trends , COVID-19 , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Neurology/education , Neurology/trends , Pandemics , Clinical Competence , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/trends
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