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1.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3199-3202, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1474921

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on neuroscientists, including those involved in translational research. In this NeuroView, we discuss the positive and negative effects of the pandemic on preclinical research and clinical studies in humans.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/epidemiology , Biomedical Research/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Neurology/methods , Alzheimer Disease/therapy , Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Neurodegenerative Diseases/epidemiology , Neurodegenerative Diseases/therapy , Neurology/trends
2.
Neurol Clin ; 39(3): 699-704, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294076

ABSTRACT

The adaption of online or virtual technologies to deliver care, to meet professionally, and to interview has transformed child neurology. Although these technologies were brought to bear out of necessity, it is hoped that in a postpandemic world, these useful tools will continue to benefit the field. Here we discuss the tools and their future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nervous System Diseases , Neurology , Pediatrics , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Neurology/trends , Pediatrics/trends , Telemedicine/trends
4.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 207: 106717, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252595

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine how neurology departments and residency programs in the United States used virtual communication to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic, we investigated the presence and use of social media pages, virtual outreach events, and virtual internship opportunities. METHODS: Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook accounts were identified (or noted as nonexistent) for 159 accredited neurology departments and residency programs. Google searches and social media site specific searches were performed. For existing pages, the date of creation was determined and all posts on and after March 1st, 2020, were assessed to investigate the presence of virtual open house advertisements. Each program was also assessed for virtual sub-internship and elective opportunities on the Visiting Student Application Service (VSAS). RESULTS: A majority of neurology residency programs (110) had a social media presence, particularly on Twitter and Instagram. Most residency program Twitter and Instagram accounts were created after March 1st, 2020, and this was not the case on Facebook. Twitter and Instagram were used most to advertise virtual opportunities. A correlation was observed between presence and number of social media accounts and program prestige. Few programs offered virtual opportunities on VSAS for the 2020-2021 year. CONCLUSION: Neurology residency programs adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic by creating residency social media accounts, primarily on Instagram and Twitter, and hosting virtual informational events. We recommend that neurology residency applicants create professional Instagram and Twitter accounts to network with programs and receive updates about virtual events. Similarly, going forward, we recommend continued social media use by neurology residency programs for applicant outreach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Internship and Residency/trends , Neurology/education , Neurology/trends , Social Media/trends , Humans , Internship and Residency/methods , Job Application , Retrospective Studies , United States
5.
Rev Neurol ; 72(11): 397-406, 2021 06 01.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248580

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: For more than a decade, following the ECTRIMS Congress, the Post-ECTRIMS Meeting has been held in Spain, where neurologists with expertise in multiple sclerosis (MS) from all over the country meet to review the most relevant latest developments presented at the ECTRIMS congress (on this occasion held together with ACTRIMS). AIM: This article, published in two parts, summarises the presentations that took place at the Post-ECTRIMS Meeting, held online on 16 and 17 October 2020. DEVELOPMENT: This first part includes the latest results regarding the impact of the environment and lifestyle on risk of MS and its clinical course, and the role of epigenetics and genetic factors on these processes. Findings from preclinical and clinical research on the lymphocyte subtypes identified and the involvement of lymphoid follicles and meningeal involvement in the disease are discussed. Changes in brain structure are addressed at the microscopic and macroscopic levels, including results from high-resolution imaging techniques. The latest advances on biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of MS, and on the involvement of the microbiome in these patients are also reported. Finally, results from patient registries on the impact of COVID-19 in MS patients are outlined. CONCLUSIONS: There have been new data on MS risk factors, the impact of MS at the cellular and structural level, the role of the microbiome in the disease, biomarkers, and the relationship between COVID-19 and MS.


TITLE: XIII Reunión Post-ECTRIMS: revisión de las novedades presentadas en el Congreso ECTRIMS 2020 (I).Introducción. Desde hace más de una década, tras el congreso ECTRIMS, se celebra en España la reunión Post-ECTRIMS, donde neurólogos expertos en esclerosis múltiple (EM) de toda España se reúnen para revisar las principales novedades presentadas en el ECTRIMS (en esta ocasión, celebrado junto con el ACTRIMS). Objetivo. En el presente artículo, publicado en dos partes, se resumen las ponencias que tuvieron lugar en la reunión Post-ECTRIMS, celebrada los días 16 y 17 de octubre de 2020 de forma virtual. Desarrollo. En esta primera parte se incluyen los últimos resultados acerca del impacto del ambiente y el estilo de vida sobre el riesgo de EM y su curso clínico, y el papel de la epigenética y los factores genéticos sobre estos procesos. Se discuten los hallazgos en investigación preclínica y clínica sobre los subtipos de linfocitos identificados, y la implicación de los folículos linfoides y la afectación meníngea en la enfermedad. Los cambios en la estructura cerebral se abordan a nivel microscópico y macroscópico, incluyendo resultados de técnicas de imagen de alta resolución. También se presentan los últimos avances sobre biomarcadores para el diagnóstico y el pronóstico de la EM, y sobre la afectación del microbioma en estos pacientes. Por último, se esbozan los resultados de registros de pacientes sobre el impacto de la COVID-19 en los pacientes con EM. Conclusiones. Ha habido nuevos datos sobre factores de riesgo de la EM, impacto de la EM a nivel celular y estructural, papel del microbioma en la enfermedad, biomarcadores y la relación entre COVID-19 y EM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis , Biomarkers , Central Nervous System/diagnostic imaging , Comorbidity , Environmental Exposure , Epigenesis, Genetic , Europe , Gray Matter/pathology , Humans , Life Style , Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Lymphoid Tissue/pathology , Meninges/pathology , Microbiota , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/genetics , Multiple Sclerosis/microbiology , Multiple Sclerosis/pathology , Neuroglia/pathology , Neurology/trends , Neurons/pathology , Remyelination
6.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg ; 201: 106436, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059739

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To evaluate overall ischemic stroke volumes and rates, specific subtypes, and clinical presentation during the COVID-19 pandemic in a multicenter observational study from eight states across US. METHODS: We compared all ischemic strokes admitted between January 2019 and May 2020, grouped as; March-May 2020 (COVID-19 period) and March-May 2019 (seasonal pre-COVID-19 period). Primary outcome was stroke severity at admission measured by NIHSS stratified as mild (0-7), moderate [8-14], and severe (>14). Secondary outcomes were volume of large vessel occlusions (LVOs), stroke etiology, IV-tPA rates, and discharge disposition. RESULTS: Of the 7969 patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke during the study period, 933 (12 %) presented in the COVID-19 period while 1319 (17 %) presented in the seasonal pre-COVID-19 period. Significant decline was observed in the mean weekly volumes of newly diagnosed ischemic strokes (98 ± 3 vs 50 ± 20,p = 0.003), LVOs (16.5 ± 3.8 vs 8.3 ± 5.9,p = 0.008), and IV-tPA (10.9 ± 3.4 vs 5.3 ± 2.9,p = 0.0047), whereas the mean weekly proportion of LVOs (18 % ±5 vs 16 % ±7,p = 0.24) and IV-tPA (10.4 % ±4.5 vs. 9.9 % ±2.4,p = 0.66) remained the same, when compared to the seasonal pre-COVID-19 period. Additionally, an increased proportion of patients presented with a severe disease (NIHSS > 14) during the COVID-19 period (29.7 % vs 24.5 %,p < 0.025). The odds of being discharged to home were 26 % greater in the COVID-19 period when compared to seasonal pre-COVID-19 period (OR:1.26, 95 % CI:1.07-1.49,p = 0.016). CONCLUSIONS: During COVID-19 period there was a decrease in volume of newly diagnosed ischemic stroke cases and IV-tPA administration. Patients admitted to the hospital had severe neurological clinical presentation and were more likely to discharge home.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurology/trends , Societies, Medical/trends , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/epidemiology , Thrombolytic Therapy/trends , Administration, Intravenous , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/administration & dosage , United States/epidemiology , Vascular Diseases/drug therapy , Vascular Diseases/epidemiology
7.
J Neurol Sci ; 421: 117287, 2021 02 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-988478

ABSTRACT

We address the impact of the tropical environment on the human nervous system using the multifaceted approach characteristic of environmental neurology. First, environmental factors are examined according to their nature (physical, chemical and biological) and in relation to human activity and behavior. Some factors are specific to the tropics (climate and infections), while others are non-specific (chemicals, human communities and their way of life). Second, we examine the major role of human adaptation to the success of Homo sapiens, with emphasis on the linkage between thermoregulation and sleep-wake regulation. Third, we examine the performance of environmental neurology as a clinical discipline in tropical climates, with focus on the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges posed by human African trypanosomiasis. Finally, the prevention, early detection and monitoring of environmental neurological diseases is examined, as well as links with political and economic factors. In conclusion, practitioners of environmental neurology seek a global, multidisciplinary and holistic approach to understanding, preventing and treating neurological disorders within their purview. Environmental neurology integrates an expanded One Health concept by linking health and wellness to the interaction of plants, animals, humans and the ecosystem. Recent epidemics and the current COVID-19 pandemic exemplify the need for worldwide action to protect human health and biodiversity.


Subject(s)
Ecosystem , Environmental Exposure/adverse effects , Environmental Medicine/trends , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Neurology/trends , Tropical Climate/adverse effects , Animals , Body Temperature Regulation/physiology , Environmental Medicine/methods , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Neurology/methods
8.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(1): 82-86, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873075

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is an international crisis placing tremendous strain on medical systems around the world. Like other specialties, neuroanesthesiology has been adversely affected and training programs have had to quickly adapt to the constantly changing environment. METHODS: An email-based survey was used to evaluate the effects of the pandemic on clinical workflow, clinical training, education, and trainee well-being. The impact of the International Council on Perioperative Neuroscience Training (ICPNT) accreditation was also assessed. RESULTS: Responses were received from 14 program directors (88% response rate) in 10 countries and from 36 fellows in these programs. Clinical training was adversely affected because of the cancellation of elective neurosurgery and other changes in case workflow, the introduction of modified airway and other protocols, and redeployment of trainees to other sites. To address educational demands, most programs utilized online platforms to organize clinical discussions, journal clubs, and provide safety training modules. Several initiatives were introduced to support trainee well-being during the pandemic. Feelings of isolation and despair among trainees varied from 2 to 8 (on a scale of 1 to 10). Fellows all reported concerns that their clinical training had been adversely affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic because of decreased exposure to elective subspecialty cases and limited opportunities to complete workplace-based assessments and training portfolio requirements. Cancellation of examination preparation courses and delayed examinations were cited as common sources of stress. Programs accredited by the ICPNT reported that international networking and collaboration was beneficial to reduce feelings of isolation during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Neuroanesthesia fellowship training program directors introduced innovative ways to maintain clinical training, educational activity and trainee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Accreditation/trends , Anesthesiology/education , Anesthesiology/trends , COVID-19 , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Neurology/education , Neurology/trends , Pandemics , Clinical Competence , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/trends
9.
Neurol Sci ; 41(12): 3395-3399, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841441

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A reduction of the hospitalization and reperfusion treatments was reported during COVID-19 pandemic. However, high variability in results emerged, potentially due to logistic paradigms adopted. Here, we analyze stroke code admissions, hospitalizations, and stroke belt performance for ischemic stroke patients in the metropolitan Bologna region, comparing temporal trends between 2019 and 2020 to define the impact of COVID-19 on the stroke network. METHODS: This retrospective observational study included all people admitted at the Bologna Metropolitan Stroke Center in timeframes 1 March 2019-30 April 2019 (cohort-2019) and 1 March 2020-30 April 2020 (cohort-2020). Diagnosis, treatment strategy, and timing were compared between the two cohorts to define temporal trends. RESULTS: Overall, 283 patients were admitted to the Stroke Center, with no differences in demographic factors between cohort-2019 and cohort-2020. In cohort-2020, transient ischemic attack (TIA) was significantly less prevalent than 2019 (6.9% vs 14.4%, p = .04). Among 216 ischemic stroke patients, moderate-to-severe stroke was more represented in cohort-2020 (17.8% vs 6.2%, p = .027). Similar proportions of patients underwent reperfusion (45.9% in 2019 vs 53.4% in 2020), although a slight increase in combined treatment was detected (14.4% vs 25.4%, p = .05). Door-to-scan timing was significantly prolonged in 2020 compared with 2019 (28.4 ± 12.6 vs 36.7 ± 14.6, p = .03), although overall timing from stroke to treatment was preserved. CONCLUSION: During COVID-19 pandemic, TIA and minor stroke consistently reduced compared to the same timeframe in 2019. Longer stroke-to-call and door-to-scan times, attributable to change in citizen behavior and screening at hospital arrival, did not impact on stroke-to-treatment time. Mothership model might have minimized the effects of the pandemic on the stroke care organization.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Neurology/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment/trends
11.
Headache ; 60(10): 2665-2668, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-810902

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The care and management of migraine/headache patients in the Republic of Ireland over the last 25 years are summarized in this article. METHODS: Collaboration between voluntary patient organizations (the Migraine Association of Ireland or MAI), primary care services, and hospital/community shared healthcare professionals (most notably the headache specialist nurse), is highlighted as one of the key features of this management strategy in an underfunded and under-resourced public healthcare system. CONCLUSION: The migraine/headache community in Ireland is small, but they have been dedicated in their commitment to improving care for their patients for more than 2 decades. As a result, they have been successful in recent years, both nationally and internationally, in terms of financial funding and support for their multidisciplinary and collaborative approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Headache , Migraine Disorders , Neurology/trends , Humans , Ireland , Neurology/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Neurologia (Engl Ed) ; 35(4): 252-257, 2020 May.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-700407

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic will give rise to long-term changes in neurological care, which are not easily predictable. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A key informant survey was used to enquire about the changes expected in the specialty over the next 5 years. The survey was completed by heads of neurology departments with broad knowledge of the situation, having been active during the pandemic. RESULTS: Despite a low level of consensus between participants, there was strong (85%) and moderate consensus (70%) about certain subjects, mainly the increase in precautions to be taken, the use of telemedicine and teleconsultations, the reduction of care provided in in-person consultations to avoid the presence of large numbers of people in waiting rooms, the development of remote training solutions, and the changes in monitoring visits during clinical trials. There was consensus that there would be no changes to the indication of complementary testing or neurological examination. CONCLUSION: The key informant survey identified the foreseeable changes in neurological care after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Health Care Surveys , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Neurology/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Administrative Personnel/psychology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Management , Distance Counseling , Forecasting , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Neurologic Examination , Neurology/methods , Neurology/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Isolation , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Spain/epidemiology
14.
Neurol Sci ; 41(6): 1369-1371, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616666

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As a consequence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, a large amount of consultations will be delivered through tele-medicine, especially for diseases causing chronic disability and requiring immunomodulatory treatments, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: We have hereby reviewed available tools for tele-neurology examination in MS, including components of neurological examination that can be assessed through video, patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), and digital technology. RESULTS: Overall, we have suggested a battery for assessing MS disability and relapses on tele-medicine, which brings together conventional examination, PROMs (e.g., Patient Determined Disease Steps, MS Impact Scale), and cognitive tests (Symbol Digit Modalities Test) that can be delivered remotely and in multiple languages. DISCUSSION: The use of common tools for neurological examination could improve tele-neurology practice for both general neurologists and MS specialists, and quality of care for people with MS.


Subject(s)
Disability Evaluation , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/therapy , Neurology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/diagnosis , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/diagnosis , Neurology/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/trends
15.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 29(8): 104988, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-602487

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic's impact on stroke care is two-fold direct impact of the infection and indirect impact on non-COVID-19 diseases. Anecdotal evidence and clinical observation suggest that there is a decrease in the number of patients presenting with stroke during the pandemic. We aim to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the utilization of stroke emergency services on a single comprehensive stroke center (CSC). METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database and compared all emergency department (ED) encounters, acute stroke admissions (including TIA), and thrombectomy cases admitted in March 2017-2019 to patients admitted in March 2020 at a comprehensive stroke center. RESULTS: Number of total ED encounters (22%, p=0.005), acute ischemic strokes (40%, p=0.001), and TIAs (60%, p=0.163) decreased between March of 2017-2019 compared to March of 2020. The number of patients undergoing EVT in March 2020 was comparable to March 2017-2019 (p=0.430). CONCLUSION: A pandemic-related stay-at-home policy reduces the utilization of stroke emergency services at a CSC. This effect appears to be more prominent for ED encounters, all stroke admissions and TIAs, and less impactful for severe strokes. Given the relatively low prevalence of COVID-19 cases in our region, this decrement is likely related to healthcare seeking behavior rather than capacity saturation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Emergency Medical Services/trends , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Needs Assessment/trends , Neurology/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Stroke/therapy , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Databases, Factual , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Pandemics , Pennsylvania/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/epidemiology , Time Factors
17.
Neurol Sci ; 41(8): 1977-1979, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-601524

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, most memory clinics have had to suspend their activities. On the other hand, international dementia experts have recommended to provide urgently worldwide support for people living with dementia. This situation urges to play out new strategies to guarantee adequate care. Telemedicine and digital technology (DT) devices, such as smartphones, can be very helpful in remote monitoring and care. Technological devices such as videoconference or smartphone apps might be used for follow-up visits and support to patients and caregivers and to acquire digital markers of clinical progression. Hopefully, this dramatic situation would facilitate the process of progressive familiarization of neurologists with telemedicine and DT approach.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Dementia , Neurology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Dementia/diagnosis , Dementia/therapy , Humans , Neurology/methods , Neurology/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Smartphone , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends
18.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 40(3): 378-384, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-619807

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telehealth provides health care to a patient from a provider at a distant location. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, adoption of telehealth modalities was increasing slowly but steadily. During the public health emergency, rapid widespread telehealth implementation has been encouraged to promote patient and provider safety and preserve access to health care. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: Evidence was acquired from English language Internet searches of the medical and business literature and following breaking news on the COVID-19 pandemic and responses from health care stakeholders, including policymakers, payers, physicians, health care organizations, and patients. We also had extensive discussions with colleagues who are developing telehealth techniques relevant to neuro-ophthalmology. RESULTS: Regulatory, legal, reimbursement, and cultural barriers impeded the widespread adoption of telehealth before the COVID-19 pandemic. With the increased use of telehealth in response to the public health emergency, we are rapidly accumulating experience and an evidence base identifying opportunities and challenges related to the widespread adoption of tele-neuro-ophthalmology. One of the major challenges is the current inability to adequately perform funduscopy remotely. CONCLUSIONS: Telehealth is an increasingly recognized means of health care delivery. Tele-Neuro-Ophthalmology adoption is necessary for the sake of our patients, the survival of our subspecialty, and the education of our trainees and students. Telehealth does not supplant but supplements and complements in-person neuro-ophthalmologic care. Innovations in digital optical fundus photography, mobile vision testing applications, artificial intelligence, and principles of channel management will facilitate further adoption of tele-neuro-ophthalmology and bring the specialty to the leading edge of health care delivery.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Eye Diseases/therapy , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Humans , Neurology/trends , Ophthalmology/trends , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Neurol Sci ; 414: 116930, 2020 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-378542

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic mandated rapid transition from face-to-face encounters to teleneurology visits. While teleneurology is regularly used in acute stroke care, its application in other branches of neurology was limited. Here we review how the recent pandemic has created a paradigm shift in caring for patients with chronic neurological disorders and how academic institutions have responded to the present need. METHOD: Literature review was performed to examine the recent changes in health policies. Number of outpatient visits and televisits in the Department of Neurology was reviewed from Yale University School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine to examine the road to transition to televisit. RESULTS: The federal government and the insurance providers extended their supports during the COVID-19 pandemic. Several rules and regulations regarding teleneurology were revised and relaxed to address the current need. New technologies for video conferencing were incorporated. The transition to televisits went smoothly in both the institutions and number of face-to-face encounters decreased dramatically along with a rapid rise in televisits within 2 weeks of the declaration of national emergency. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE: The need for "social distancing" during the COVID-19 pandemic has created a major surge in the number of teleneurology visits, which will probably continue for the next few months. It may have initiated a more permanent transition to virtual technology incorporated medical care.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Neurology/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Telemedicine/trends , COVID-19 , Chronic Disease , Humans , Internet , Licensure, Medical , Medicaid , Medicare , Nervous System Diseases/economics , Neurologic Examination , Neurology/economics , Neurology/methods , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/economics , Telemedicine/legislation & jurisprudence , United States , Videoconferencing/trends
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