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1.
Cell Mol Biol Lett ; 27(1): 10, 2022 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753103

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has spread worldwide, and finding a safe therapeutic strategy and effective vaccine is critical to overcoming severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Therefore, elucidation of pathogenesis mechanisms, especially entry routes of SARS-CoV-2 may help propose antiviral drugs and novel vaccines. Several receptors have been demonstrated for the interaction of spike (S) protein of SARS-CoV-2 with host cells, including angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE2), ephrin ligands and Eph receptors, neuropilin 1 (NRP-1), P2X7, and CD147. The expression of these entry receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) may make the CNS prone to SARS-CoV-2 invasion, leading to neurodegenerative diseases. The present review provides potential pathological mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the CNS, including entry receptors and cytokines involved in neuroinflammatory conditions. Moreover, it explains several neurodegenerative disorders associated with COVID-19. Finally, we suggest inflammasome and JaK inhibitors as potential therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Central Nervous System/drug effects , Inflammasomes/drug effects , Neurodegenerative Diseases/drug therapy , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Basigin/genetics , Basigin/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Central Nervous System/metabolism , Central Nervous System/virology , Ephrins/genetics , Ephrins/metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Inflammasomes/genetics , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Janus Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinases/genetics , Janus Kinases/metabolism , Neurodegenerative Diseases/genetics , Neurodegenerative Diseases/metabolism , Neurodegenerative Diseases/virology , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Receptors, Purinergic P2X7/genetics , Receptors, Purinergic P2X7/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Signal Transduction
2.
Epigenomics ; 14(3): 153-162, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622527

ABSTRACT

Smoking could predispose individuals to a more severe COVID-19 by upregulating a particular gene known as mdig, which is mediated through a number of well-known histone modifications. Smoking might regulate the transcription-activating H3K4me3 mark, along with the transcription-repressing H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 marks, in a way to favor SARS-CoV-2 entry by enhancing the expression of ACE2, NRP1 and NRP2, AT1R, CTSD and CTSL, PGE2 receptors 2-4, SLC6A20 and IL-6, all of which interact either directly or indirectly with important receptors, facilitating viral entry in COVID-19.


Lay abstract The role of smoking in development of several respiratory diseases has been clearly established. A significant proportion of these deleterious effects is mediated through epigenetic mechanisms, particularly histone modifications. Recent evidence indicates that smoking induces the expression of a mediator known as mdig, which in turn alters the transcription of several key proteins that have been implicated in development of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Dioxygenases/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic , Histone Demethylases/genetics , Histones/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Protein Processing, Post-Translational , Smoking/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cathepsin D/genetics , Cathepsin D/metabolism , Cathepsin L/genetics , Cathepsin L/metabolism , Dioxygenases/metabolism , Histone Demethylases/metabolism , Histones/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Membrane Transport Proteins/genetics , Membrane Transport Proteins/metabolism , Methylation , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Neuropilin-2/genetics , Neuropilin-2/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Protein Isoforms/genetics , Protein Isoforms/metabolism , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/genetics , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/metabolism , Receptors, Prostaglandin E/genetics , Receptors, Prostaglandin E/metabolism , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Smoking/metabolism , Smoking/pathology , Virus Internalization
3.
Int J Mol Med ; 49(2)2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594678

ABSTRACT

The pathophysiology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID­19) is mainly dependent on the underlying mechanisms that mediate the entry of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2) into the host cells of the various human tissues/organs. Recent studies have indicated a higher order of complexity of the mechanisms of infectivity, given that there is a wide­repertoire of possible cell entry mediators that appear to co­localise in a cell­ and tissue­specific manner. The present study provides an overview of the 'canonical' SARS­CoV­2 mediators, namely angiotensin converting enzyme 2, transmembrane protease serine 2 and 4, and neuropilin­1, expanding on the involvement of novel candidates, including glucose­regulated protein 78, basigin, kidney injury molecule­1, metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2, ADAM metallopeptidase domain 17 (also termed tumour necrosis factor­α convertase) and Toll­like receptor 4. Furthermore, emerging data indicate that changes in microRNA (miRNA/miR) expression levels in patients with COVID­19 are suggestive of further complexity in the regulation of these viral mediators. An in silico analysis revealed 160 candidate miRNAs with potential strong binding capacity in the aforementioned genes. Future studies should concentrate on elucidating the association between the cellular tropism of the SARS­CoV­2 cell entry mediators and the mechanisms through which they might affect the clinical outcome. Finally, the clinical utility as a biomarker or therapeutic target of miRNAs in the context of COVID­19 warrants further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , /metabolism , Gene Expression Regulation , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , MicroRNAs/genetics , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 4/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Viral Tropism
4.
Mol Med ; 27(1): 162, 2021 12 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582120

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a novel type b coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. With over 224 million confirmed infections with this virus and more than 4.6 million people dead because of it, it is critically important to define the immunological processes occurring in the human response to this virus and pathogenetic mechanisms of its deadly manifestation. This perspective focuses on the contribution of the recently discovered interaction of SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein with neuropilin 1 (NRP1) receptor, NRP1 as a virus entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2, its role in different physiologic and pathologic conditions, and the potential to target the Spike-NRP1 interaction to combat virus infectivity and severe disease manifestations.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Neuropilin-1/chemistry , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/etiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Infant , Molecular Targeted Therapy/methods , Neuropilin-1/immunology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/drug therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
5.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 3172, 2021 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550281

ABSTRACT

Secreted class 3 semaphorins (Sema3s) form tripartite complexes with the plexin receptor and neuropilin coreceptor, which are both transmembrane proteins that together mediate semaphorin signal for neuronal axon guidance and other processes. Despite extensive investigations, the overall architecture of and the molecular interactions in the Sema3/plexin/neuropilin complex are incompletely understood. Here we present the cryo-EM structure of a near intact extracellular region complex of Sema3A, PlexinA4 and Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) at 3.7 Å resolution. The structure shows a large symmetric 2:2:2 assembly in which each subunit makes multiple interactions with others. The two PlexinA4 molecules in the complex do not interact directly, but their membrane proximal regions are close to each other and poised to promote the formation of the intracellular active dimer for signaling. The structure reveals a previously unknown interface between the a2b1b2 module in Nrp1 and the Sema domain of Sema3A. This interaction places the a2b1b2 module at the top of the complex, far away from the plasma membrane where the transmembrane regions of Nrp1 and PlexinA4 embed. As a result, the region following the a2b1b2 module in Nrp1 must span a large distance to allow the connection to the transmembrane region, suggesting an essential role for the long non-conserved linkers and the MAM domain in neuropilin in the semaphorin/plexin/neuropilin complex.


Subject(s)
Nerve Tissue Proteins/ultrastructure , Neuropilin-1/ultrastructure , Receptors, Cell Surface/ultrastructure , Semaphorin-3A/ultrastructure , Animals , COS Cells , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cryoelectron Microscopy , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mutation , Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics , Nerve Tissue Proteins/isolation & purification , Nerve Tissue Proteins/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/isolation & purification , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Protein Binding/genetics , Protein Domains/genetics , Protein Multimerization/genetics , Receptors, Cell Surface/genetics , Receptors, Cell Surface/isolation & purification , Receptors, Cell Surface/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins/genetics , Recombinant Proteins/isolation & purification , Recombinant Proteins/metabolism , Recombinant Proteins/ultrastructure , Semaphorin-3A/genetics , Semaphorin-3A/isolation & purification , Semaphorin-3A/metabolism
6.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6671-6685, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544318

ABSTRACT

Infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes a wide spectrum of syndromes involving multiple organ systems and is primarily mediated by viral spike (S) glycoprotein through the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and numerous cellular proteins including ACE2, transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2), kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1), and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1). In this study, we examined the entry tropism of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV using S protein-based pseudoviruses to infect 22 cell lines and 3 types of primary cells isolated from respiratory, urinary, digestive, reproductive, and immune systems. At least one cell line or type of primary cell from each organ system was infected by both pseudoviruses. Infection by pseudoviruses is effectively blocked by S1, RBD, and ACE2 recombinant proteins, and more weakly by Kim-1 and NRP-1 recombinant proteins. Furthermore, cells with robust SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus infection had strong expression of either ACE2 or Kim-1 and NRP-1 proteins. ACE2 glycosylation appeared to be critical for the infections of both viruses as there was a positive correlation between infectivity of either SARS-CoV-2 or SARS-CoV pseudovirus with the level of glycosylated ACE2 (gly-ACE2). These results reveal that SARS-CoV-2 cell entry could be mediated by either an ACE2-dependent or -independent mechanism, thus providing a likely molecular basis for its broad tropism for a wide variety of cell types.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Tract/virology , Genitalia/virology , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 1/metabolism , Immune System/virology , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Blotting, Western , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Cells, Cultured , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Gastrointestinal Tract/cytology , Genitalia/cytology , Humans , Immune System/cytology , Respiratory System/cytology
7.
Front Immunol ; 12: 740260, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506482

ABSTRACT

Increased left ventricular fibrosis has been reported in patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It is unclear whether this fibrosis is a consequence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection or a risk factor for severe disease progression. We observed increased fibrosis in the left ventricular myocardium of deceased COVID-19 patients, compared with matched controls. We also detected increased mRNA levels of soluble interleukin-1 receptor-like 1 (sIL1-RL1) and transforming growth factor ß1 (TGF-ß1) in the left ventricular myocardium of deceased COVID-19 patients. Biochemical analysis of blood sampled from patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) with COVID-19 revealed highly elevated levels of TGF-ß1 mRNA in these patients compared to controls. Left ventricular strain measured by echocardiography as a marker of pre-existing cardiac fibrosis correlated strongly with blood TGF-ß1 mRNA levels and predicted disease severity in COVID-19 patients. In the left ventricular myocardium and lungs of COVID-19 patients, we found increased neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) RNA levels, which correlated strongly with the prevalence of pulmonary SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid. Cardiac and pulmonary fibrosis may therefore predispose these patients to increased cellular viral entry in the lung, which may explain the worse clinical outcome observed in our cohort. Our study demonstrates that patients at risk of clinical deterioration can be identified early by echocardiographic strain analysis and quantification of blood TGF-ß1 mRNA performed at the time of first medical contact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Heart Ventricles/pathology , Myocardium/pathology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Fibrosis , Heart Ventricles/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/genetics , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardium/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Pulmonary Fibrosis/immunology , Risk , Severity of Illness Index , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/genetics , Transforming Growth Factor beta1/metabolism , Viral Load
8.
Viruses ; 13(11)2021 10 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488764

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) is primarily responsible for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and it is characterized by respiratory illness with fever and dyspnea. Severe vascular problems and several other manifestations, including neurological ones, have also been frequently reported, particularly in the great majority of "long hauler" patients. SARS-CoV-2 infects and replicates in lung epithelial cells, while dysfunction of endothelial and neuronal brain cells has been observed in the absence of productive infection. It has been shown that the Spike protein can interact with specific cellular receptors, supporting both viral entry and cellular dysfunction. It is thus clear that understanding how and when these receptors are regulated, as well as how much they are expressed would help in unveiling the multifaceted aspects of this disease. Here, we show that SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells express three important cellular surface molecules that interact with the Spike protein, namely ACE2, TMPRSS2, and NRP1. Their levels increase when cells are treated with retinoic acid (RA), a commonly used agent known to promote differentiation. This increase matched the higher levels of receptors observed on HUVEC (primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells). We also show by confocal imaging that replication-defective pseudoviruses carrying the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein can infect differentiated and undifferentiated SH-SY5Y, and HUVEC cells, although with different efficiencies. Neuronal cells and endothelial cells are potential targets for SARS-CoV-2 infection and the interaction of the Spike viral protein with these cells may cause their dysregulation. Characterizing RNA and protein expression tempo, mode, and levels of different SARS-CoV-2 receptors on both cell subpopulations may have clinical relevance for the diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19-infected subjects, including long hauler patients with neurological manifestations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Neuroblastoma/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line, Tumor , Endothelial Cells/virology , Host Microbial Interactions , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells , Humans , Neuroblastoma/virology , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization
9.
Biomolecules ; 11(11)2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480577

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 contains certain molecules that are related to the presence of immunothrombosis. Here, we review the pathogen and damage-associated molecular patterns. We also study the imbalance of different molecules participating in immunothrombosis, such as tissue factor, factors of the contact system, histones, and the role of cells, such as endothelial cells, platelets, and neutrophil extracellular traps. Regarding the pathogenetic mechanism, we discuss clinical trials, case-control studies, comparative and translational studies, and observational studies of regulatory or inhibitory molecules, more specifically, extracellular DNA and RNA, histones, sensors for RNA and DNA, as well as heparin and heparinoids. Overall, it appears that a network of cells and molecules identified in this axis is simultaneously but differentially affecting patients at different stages of COVID-19, and this is characterized by endothelial damage, microthrombosis, and inflammation.


Subject(s)
Alarmins , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Blood Coagulation , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/complications , DNA/metabolism , Extracellular Traps , Heparin/metabolism , Histones/metabolism , Humans , Mice , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , RNA/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Thrombin/metabolism , Thromboplastin/metabolism , Thrombosis/complications
10.
Physiol Rep ; 9(17): e15014, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410554

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is threatening people's lives and impacting their health. It is still unclear whether people engaged in physical activity are at an increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and severe forms of COVID-19. In order to provide data to help answer this question, we, therefore, investigated the effects of endurance training on the levels of host proteins involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection in mice. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were subjected to treadmill running (17-25 m/min, 60-90 min, 5 sessions/week, 8 weeks). After the intervention, the levels of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2; host receptor for SARS-CoV-2), transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2; host protease priming fusion of SARS-CoV-2 to host cell membranes), FURIN (host protease that promotes binding of SARS-CoV-2 to host receptors), and Neuropilin-1 (host coreceptor for SARS-CoV-2) were measured in 10 organs that SARS-CoV-2 can infect (larynx, trachea, lung, heart, jejunum, ileum, colon, liver, kidney, and testis). Six organs (heart, lung, jejunum, liver, trachea, and ileum) showed changes in the levels of at least one of the proteins. Endurance training increased ACE2 levels in heart (+66.4%), lung (+37.1%), jejunum (+24.7%) and liver (+27.4%), and FURIN in liver (+17.9%) tissue. In contrast, endurance training decreased Neuropilin-1 levels in liver (-39.7%), trachea (-41.2%), and ileum (-39.7%), and TMPRSS2 in lung (-11.3%). Taken together, endurance training altered the levels of host proteins involved in SARS-CoV-2 cell entry in an organ-dependent manner.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Physical Conditioning, Animal , Physical Endurance , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virus Internalization , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/enzymology , Furin/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Male , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Running , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism
11.
Mol Syst Biol ; 17(9): e10079, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406892

ABSTRACT

We modeled 3D structures of all SARS-CoV-2 proteins, generating 2,060 models that span 69% of the viral proteome and provide details not available elsewhere. We found that ˜6% of the proteome mimicked human proteins, while ˜7% was implicated in hijacking mechanisms that reverse post-translational modifications, block host translation, and disable host defenses; a further ˜29% self-assembled into heteromeric states that provided insight into how the viral replication and translation complex forms. To make these 3D models more accessible, we devised a structural coverage map, a novel visualization method to show what is-and is not-known about the 3D structure of the viral proteome. We integrated the coverage map into an accompanying online resource (https://aquaria.ws/covid) that can be used to find and explore models corresponding to the 79 structural states identified in this work. The resulting Aquaria-COVID resource helps scientists use emerging structural data to understand the mechanisms underlying coronavirus infection and draws attention to the 31% of the viral proteome that remains structurally unknown or dark.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Protein Processing, Post-Translational , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/chemistry , Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/genetics , Amino Acid Transport Systems, Neutral/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Binding Sites , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Computational Biology/methods , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/chemistry , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Envelope Proteins/metabolism , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/genetics , Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Mitochondrial Membrane Transport Proteins/chemistry , Mitochondrial Membrane Transport Proteins/genetics , Mitochondrial Membrane Transport Proteins/metabolism , Models, Molecular , Molecular Mimicry , Neuropilin-1/chemistry , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Phosphoproteins/genetics , Phosphoproteins/metabolism , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Protein Interaction Mapping/methods , Protein Multimerization , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Matrix Proteins/chemistry , Viral Matrix Proteins/genetics , Viral Matrix Proteins/metabolism , Viroporin Proteins/chemistry , Viroporin Proteins/genetics , Viroporin Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication
12.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(9): e1009878, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394563

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 fine-tunes the interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral responses, which play a key role in preventing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) progression. Indeed, critically ill patients show an impaired type I IFN response accompanied by elevated inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels, responsible for cell and tissue damage and associated multi-organ failure. Here, the early interaction between SARS-CoV-2 and immune cells was investigated by interrogating an in vitro human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based experimental model. We found that, even in absence of a productive viral replication, the virus mediates a vigorous TLR7/8-dependent production of both type I and III IFNs and inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, known to contribute to the cytokine storm observed in COVID-19. Interestingly, we observed how virus-induced type I IFN secreted by PBMC enhances anti-viral response in infected lung epithelial cells, thus, inhibiting viral replication. This type I IFN was released by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) via an ACE-2-indipendent but Neuropilin-1-dependent mechanism. Viral sensing regulates pDC phenotype by inducing cell surface expression of PD-L1 marker, a feature of type I IFN producing cells. Coherently to what observed in vitro, asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infected subjects displayed a similar pDC phenotype associated to a very high serum type I IFN level and induction of anti-viral IFN-stimulated genes in PBMC. Conversely, hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19 display very low frequency of circulating pDC with an inflammatory phenotype and high levels of chemokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum. This study further shed light on the early events resulting from the interaction between SARS-CoV-2 and immune cells occurring in vitro and confirmed ex vivo. These observations can improve our understanding on the contribution of pDC/type I IFN axis in the regulation of the anti-viral state in asymptomatic and severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Dendritic Cells/classification , Interferon Type I/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged, 80 and over , Asymptomatic Infections , Cell Line, Tumor , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/virology , Epithelial Cells/cytology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Interferon Type I/immunology , Lung/cytology , Male , Middle Aged , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Phenotype , Severity of Illness Index , Toll-Like Receptor 7/metabolism
13.
Cell Metab ; 33(8): 1565-1576.e5, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343160

ABSTRACT

Emerging evidence points toward an intricate relationship between the pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and diabetes. While preexisting diabetes is associated with severe COVID-19, it is unclear whether COVID-19 severity is a cause or consequence of diabetes. To mechanistically link COVID-19 to diabetes, we tested whether insulin-producing pancreatic ß cells can be infected by SARS-CoV-2 and cause ß cell depletion. We found that the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, ACE2, and related entry factors (TMPRSS2, NRP1, and TRFC) are expressed in ß cells, with selectively high expression of NRP1. We discovered that SARS-CoV-2 infects human pancreatic ß cells in patients who succumbed to COVID-19 and selectively infects human islet ß cells in vitro. We demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 infection attenuates pancreatic insulin levels and secretion and induces ß cell apoptosis, each rescued by NRP1 inhibition. Phosphoproteomic pathway analysis of infected islets indicates apoptotic ß cell signaling, similar to that observed in type 1 diabetes (T1D). In summary, our study shows SARS-CoV-2 can directly induce ß cell killing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Insulin-Secreting Cells/virology , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virus Internalization , A549 Cells , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Antigens, CD/metabolism , Apoptosis , Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/metabolism , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Case-Control Studies , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Insulin/metabolism , Insulin-Secreting Cells/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Receptors, Transferrin/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
14.
Theranostics ; 11(16): 7970-7983, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337804

ABSTRACT

The novel ß-coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has infected more than 177 million people and resulted in 3.84 million death worldwide. Recent epidemiological studies suggested that some environmental factors, such as air pollution, might be the important contributors to the mortality of COVID-19. However, how environmental exposure enhances the severity of COVID-19 remains to be fully understood. In the present report, we provided evidence showing that mdig, a previously reported environmentally-induced oncogene that antagonizes repressive trimethylation of histone proteins, is an important regulator for SARS-CoV-2 receptors neuropilin-1 (NRP1) and NRP2, cathepsins, glycan metabolism and inflammation, key determinants for viral infection and cytokine storm of the patients. Depletion of mdig in bronchial epithelial cells by CRISPR-Cas-9 gene editing resulted in a decreased expression of NRP1, NRP2, cathepsins, and genes involved in protein glycosylation and inflammation, largely due to a substantial enrichment of lysine 9 and/or lysine 27 trimethylation of histone H3 (H3K9me3/H3K27me3) on these genes as determined by ChIP-seq. Meanwhile, we also validated that environmental factor arsenic is able to induce mdig, NRP1 and NRP2, and genetic disruption of mdig lowered expression of NRP1 and NRP2. Furthermore, mdig may coordinate with the Neanderthal variants linked to an elevated mortality of COVID-19. These data, thus, suggest that mdig is a key mediator for the severity of COVID-19 in response to environmental exposure and targeting mdig may be the one of the effective strategies in ameliorating the symptom and reducing the mortality of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Dioxygenases/metabolism , Histone Demethylases/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Polysaccharides/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cathepsins/metabolism , Cell Line , Cells, Cultured , Dioxygenases/biosynthesis , Dioxygenases/genetics , Environmental Exposure , Histone Demethylases/biosynthesis , Histone Demethylases/genetics , Histones/metabolism , Humans , Nuclear Proteins/biosynthesis , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Pandemics , Rats , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
15.
Biomolecules ; 11(5)2021 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334991

ABSTRACT

The vascular endothelium acts as a selective barrier to regulate macromolecule exchange between the blood and tissues. However, the integrity of the endothelium barrier is compromised in an array of pathological settings, including ischemic disease and cancer, which are the leading causes of death worldwide. The resulting vascular hyperpermeability to plasma molecules as well as leukocytes then leads to tissue damaging edema formation and inflammation. The vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is a potent permeability factor, and therefore a desirable target for impeding vascular hyperpermeability. However, VEGFA also promotes angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, which is required for reperfusion of ischemic tissues. Moreover, edema increases interstitial pressure in poorly perfused tumors, thereby affecting the delivery of therapeutics, which could be counteracted by stimulating the growth of new functional blood vessels. Thus, targets must be identified to accurately modulate the barrier function of blood vessels without affecting angiogenesis, as well as to develop more effective pro- or anti-angiogenic therapies. Recent studies have shown that the VEGFA co-receptor neuropilin 1 (NRP1) could be playing a fundamental role in steering VEGFA-induced responses of vascular endothelial cells towards angiogenesis or vascular permeability. Moreover, NRP1 is involved in mediating permeability signals induced by ligands other than VEGFA. This review therefore focuses on current knowledge on the role of NRP1 in the regulation of vascular permeability signaling in the endothelium to provide an up-to-date landscape of the current knowledge in this field.


Subject(s)
Capillary Permeability , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Animals , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Signal Transduction , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism
16.
Comput Biol Med ; 141: 104714, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330721

ABSTRACT

The evolution of new severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants around the globe has made the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic more worrisome, pressuring the health care system and resulting in an increased mortality rate. Recent studies recognized neuropilin-1 (NRP1) as a key facilitator in the invasion of the new SARS-CoV-2 into the host cell. Therefore, it is considered an imperative drug target for the treatment of COVID-19. Hence, a thorough analysis was needed to understand the impact and to guide new therapeutics development. In this study, we used structural and biomolecular simulation techniques to identify novel marine natural products which could block this receptor and stop the virus entry. We discovered that the binding affinity of CMNPD10175, CMNPD10017, CMNPD10114, CMNPD10115, CMNPD10020. CMNPD10018, CMNPD10153, CMNPD10149 CMNPD10464 and CMNPD10019 were substantial during the virtual screening (VS). We further explored these compounds by analyzing their absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion and toxicity (ADMET) properties and structural-dynamics features. Free energy calculations further established that all the compounds exhibit stronger binding energy for NRP1. Consequently, we hypothesized that these compounds might be the best lead candidates for therapeutic interventions hindering virus binding to the host cell. This study provides a strong impetus to develop novel drugs against the SARS-CoV-2 by targeting NRP1.


Subject(s)
Biological Products/pharmacology , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Internalization , COVID-19 , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects
17.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6671-6685, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330343

ABSTRACT

Infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes a wide spectrum of syndromes involving multiple organ systems and is primarily mediated by viral spike (S) glycoprotein through the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and numerous cellular proteins including ACE2, transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2), kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1), and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1). In this study, we examined the entry tropism of SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV using S protein-based pseudoviruses to infect 22 cell lines and 3 types of primary cells isolated from respiratory, urinary, digestive, reproductive, and immune systems. At least one cell line or type of primary cell from each organ system was infected by both pseudoviruses. Infection by pseudoviruses is effectively blocked by S1, RBD, and ACE2 recombinant proteins, and more weakly by Kim-1 and NRP-1 recombinant proteins. Furthermore, cells with robust SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus infection had strong expression of either ACE2 or Kim-1 and NRP-1 proteins. ACE2 glycosylation appeared to be critical for the infections of both viruses as there was a positive correlation between infectivity of either SARS-CoV-2 or SARS-CoV pseudovirus with the level of glycosylated ACE2 (gly-ACE2). These results reveal that SARS-CoV-2 cell entry could be mediated by either an ACE2-dependent or -independent mechanism, thus providing a likely molecular basis for its broad tropism for a wide variety of cell types.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Gastrointestinal Tract/virology , Genitalia/virology , Hepatitis A Virus Cellular Receptor 1/metabolism , Immune System/virology , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Respiratory System/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Virus Internalization , Blotting, Western , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cell Line , Cells, Cultured , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Gastrointestinal Tract/cytology , Genitalia/cytology , Humans , Immune System/cytology , Respiratory System/cytology
18.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325680

ABSTRACT

Nowadays, type II diabetes mellitus, more specifically ensuing diabetic nephropathy, and severe COVID-19 disease are known to be closely associated. The exact mechanisms behind this association are less known. An implication for the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 remains controversial. Some researchers have started looking into other potential actors, such as neuropilin-1, mitochondrial glutathione, vitamin D, and DPP4. In particular, neuropilin-1 seems to play an important role in the underlying mechanism linking COVID-19 and diabetic nephropathy. We suggest, based on the findings in this review, that its up-regulation in the diabetic kidney facilitates viral entry in this tissue, and that the engagement of both processes leads to a depletion of neuropilin-1, which was demonstrated to be strongly associated with the pathogenesis of DN. More studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis, and research should be directed towards elucidating the potential roles of all these suggested actors and eventually discovering new therapeutic strategies that could reduce the burden of COVID-19 in patients with diabetic nephropathy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Diabetic Nephropathies/complications , Diabetic Nephropathies/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4/metabolism , Glutathione/metabolism , Humans , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , SARS Virus/immunology , Vitamin D/metabolism
19.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 665134, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305637

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Neuropilin-1(NRP1) is a cofactor that enhances SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus cell infectivity when co-expressed with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2(ACE2). The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) is activated in type 2 diabetes (T2D); therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if hypoglycaemia-induced stress in T2D would potentiate serum NRP1(sNRP1) levels, reflecting an increased risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods: A case-control study of aged-matched T2D (n = 23) and control (n = 23) subjects who underwent a hyperinsulinemic clamp over 1-hour to hypoglycemia(<40mg/dl) with subsequent timecourse of 4-hours and 24-hours. Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer (SOMA)-scan plasma protein measurement determined RAS-related proteins: renin (REN), angiotensinogen (AGT), ACE2, soluble NRP1(sNRP1), NRP1 ligands (Vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF and Class 3 Semaphorins, SEM3A) and NRP1 proteolytic enzyme (A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 9, ADAM9). Results: Baseline RAS overactivity was present with REN elevated and AGT decreased in T2D (p<0.05); ACE2 was unchanged. Baseline sNRP1, VEGF and ADAM9 did not differ between T2D and controls and remained unchanged in response to hypoglycaemia. However, 4-hours post-hypoglycemia, sNRP1, VEGF and ADAM9 were elevated in T2D(p<0.05). SEMA3A was not different at baseline; at hypoglycemia, SEMA3A decreased in controls only. Post-hypoglycemia, SEMA3A levels were higher in T2D versus controls. sNRP1 did not correlate with ACE2, REN or AGT. T2D subjects stratified according to ACE inhibitor (ACEi) therapies showed no difference in sNRP1 levels at either glucose normalization or hypoglycaemia. Conclusion: Hypoglycemia potentiated both plasma sNRP1 level elevation and its ligands VEGF and SEMA3A, likely through an ADAM9-mediated mechanism that was not associated with RAS overactivity or ACEi therapy; however, whether this is protective or promotes increased risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection in T2D is unclear. Clinical Trial Registration: https://clinicaltrials.gov, identifier NCT03102801.


Subject(s)
ADAM Proteins/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Hypoglycemia/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Semaphorin-3A/metabolism , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism , Aged , Angiotensins/metabolism , COVID-19 , Female , Glucose Clamp Technique , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Protective Factors , Renin/metabolism , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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