Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 14 de 14
Filter
1.
J Integr Neurosci ; 21(2): 68, 2022 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776814

ABSTRACT

Currently, in psychiatry, lithium is a drug of choice as a mood stabilizer in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder for the prevention of manic and depressive recurrences. The second most important psychiatric use of lithium is probably increasing the efficacy of antidepressants in treatment-resistant depression. In addition to its mood-stabilizing properties, lithium exerts antisuicidal, antiviral, immunomodulatory, and neuroprotective effects. The goal of the review is to describe the experimental and clinical studies on the last three properties of lithium. Antiviral effects of lithium pertain mostly to DNA viruses, especially herpes viruses. The therapeutic effects of lithium in systemic and topical administration on labial and genital herpes were demonstrated in clinical studies. There is also some evidence, mostly in experimental studies, that lithium possesses antiviral activity against RNA viruses, including coronaviruses. The immunomodulatory effect of lithium can mitigate "low-grade inflammatory" conditions in bipolar illness. The neuroprotective properties of lithium make this ion a plausible candidate for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. A favorable effect of lithium was shown in experimental models of neurodegenerative disorders. On the clinical level, some preventive action against dementia and moderately therapeutic activity in Alzheimer's disease, and mild cognitive impairment were observed. Despite promising results of lithium obtained in animal models of Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, they have not been confirmed in clinical studies. A suggestion for common mechanisms of antiviral, immunomodulatory, and neuroprotective effects of lithium is advanced.


Subject(s)
Bipolar Disorder , Neuroprotective Agents , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Bipolar Disorder/drug therapy , Lithium/pharmacology , Lithium/therapeutic use , Lithium Compounds/therapeutic use , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use
2.
Biomolecules ; 11(11)2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488477

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has escalated the occurrence of hypoxia including thrombotic stroke worldwide, for which nitric oxide (NO) therapy seems very promising and translatable. Therefore, various modes/routes of NO-delivery are now being tested in different clinical trials for safer, faster, and more effective interventions against ischemic insults. Intravenous (IV) infusion of S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), the major endogenous molecular pool of NO, has been reported to protect against mechanical cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (IR); however, it has been never tested in any kind of "clinically" relevant thromboembolic stroke models with or without comorbidities and in combination with the thrombolytic reperfusion therapy. Moreover, "IV-effects" of higher dose of GSNO following IR-injury have been contradicted to augment stroke injury. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that nebulization of low-dose GSNO will not alter blood pressure (BP) and will mitigate stroke injury in diabetic mice via enhanced cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO2). GSNO-nebulization (200 µg/kgbwt) did not alter BP, but augmented the restoration of CBF, improved behavioral outcomes and reduced stroke injury. Moreover, GSNO-nebulization increased early reoxygenation of brain tissue/PbtO2 as measured at 6.5 h post-stroke following thrombolytic reperfusion, and enervated unwanted effects of late thrombolysis in diabetic stroke. We conclude that the GSNO-nebulization is safe and effective for enhancing collateral microvascular perfusion in the early hours following stroke. Hence, nebulized-GSNO therapy has the potential to be developed and translated into an affordable field therapy against ischemic events including strokes, particularly in developing countries with limited healthcare infrastructure.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Complications/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Hemorrhage/prevention & control , S-Nitrosoglutathione/administration & dosage , Stroke/complications , Thrombolytic Therapy/adverse effects , Animals , Behavior, Animal , Blood Pressure , Blood-Brain Barrier , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hemorrhage/complications , Hypoxia , Infusions, Intravenous , Laser-Doppler Flowmetry , Male , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Microcirculation , Nebulizers and Vaporizers , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Perfusion , Reperfusion Injury/drug therapy , Risk , Stress, Mechanical
3.
Molecules ; 26(20)2021 Oct 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480881

ABSTRACT

We performed an in silico, in vitro, and in vivo assessment of a potassium 2-[2-(2-oxo-4-phenylpyrrolidin-1-yl) acetamido]ethanesulfonate (compound 1) as a potential prodrug for cognitive function improvement in ischemic brain injury. Using in silico methods, we predicted the pharmacological efficacy and possible safety in rat models. In addition, in silico data showed neuroprotective features of compound 1, which were further supported by in vitro experiments in a glutamate excitotoxicity-induced model in newborn rat cortical neuron cultures. Next, we checked whether compound 1 is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier in intact and ischemic animals. Compound 1 improved animal behavior both in intact and ischemic rats and, even though the concentration in intact brains was low, we still observed a significant anxiety reduction and activity escalation. We used molecular docking and molecular dynamics to support our hypothesis that compound 1 could affect the AMPA receptor function. In a rat model of acute focal cerebral ischemia, we studied the effects of compound 1 on the behavior and neurological deficit. An in vivo experiment demonstrated that compound 1 significantly reduced the neurological deficit and improved neurological symptom regression, exploratory behavior, and anxiety. Thus, here, for the first time, we show that compound 1 can be considered as an agent for restoring cognitive functions.


Subject(s)
Ischemic Stroke/drug therapy , Pyrrolidines/chemistry , Pyrrolidines/pharmacology , Animals , Behavior, Animal/drug effects , Brain Ischemia , Cognition/drug effects , Cognition/physiology , Disease Models, Animal , Glutamic Acid/pharmacology , Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery , Ischemic Stroke/physiopathology , Male , Molecular Docking Simulation , Neurons/drug effects , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Primary Cell Culture , Pyrrolidines/chemical synthesis , Rats , Rats, Wistar , Stroke
4.
Molecules ; 26(14)2021 Jul 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323315

ABSTRACT

Ebselen is the leader of selenorganic compounds, and starting from its identification as mimetic of the key antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase, several papers have appeared in literature claiming its biological activities. It was the subject of several clinical trials and it is currently in clinical evaluation for the treatment of COVID-19 patients. Given our interest in the synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of selenorganic derivatives with this review, we aimed to collect all the papers focused on the biological evaluation of ebselen and its close analogues, covering the timeline between 2016 and most of 2021. Our analysis evidences that, even if it lacks specificity when tested in vitro, being able to bind to every reactive cysteine, it proved to be always well tolerated in vivo, exerting no sign of toxicity whatever the administered doses. Besides, looking at the literature, we realized that no review article dealing with the synthetic approaches for the construction of the benzo[d][1,2]-selenazol-3(2H)-one scaffold is available; thus, a section of the present review article is completely devoted to this specific topic.


Subject(s)
Azoles/chemistry , Azoles/chemical synthesis , Azoles/pharmacology , Organoselenium Compounds/chemistry , Organoselenium Compounds/chemical synthesis , Organoselenium Compounds/pharmacology , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Biomimetics/methods , Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Glutathione Peroxidase/metabolism , Glutathione Peroxidase/pharmacology , Humans , Isoindoles , Molecular Structure , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Selenium/chemistry , Selenoproteins/chemical synthesis , Selenoproteins/pharmacology
5.
Plant J ; 107(5): 1299-1319, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282039

ABSTRACT

Caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) are specialized plant metabolites we encounter in our daily life. Humans consume CQAs in mg-to-gram quantities through dietary consumption of plant products. CQAs are considered beneficial for human health, mainly due to their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Recently, new biosynthetic pathways via a peroxidase-type p-coumaric acid 3-hydroxylase enzyme were discovered. More recently, a new GDSL lipase-like enzyme able to transform monoCQAs into diCQA was identified in Ipomoea batatas. CQAs were recently linked to memory improvement; they seem to be strong indirect antioxidants via Nrf2 activation. However, there is a prevalent confusion in the designation and nomenclature of different CQA isomers. Such inconsistencies are critical and complicate bioactivity assessment since different isomers differ in bioactivity and potency. A detailed explanation regarding the origin of such confusion is provided, and a recommendation to unify nomenclature is suggested. Furthermore, for studies on CQA bioactivity, plant-based laboratory animal diets contain CQAs, which makes it difficult to include proper control groups for comparison. Therefore, a synthetic diet free of CQAs is advised to avoid interferences since some CQAs may produce bioactivity even at nanomolar levels. Biotransformation of CQAs by gut microbiota, the discovery of new enzymatic biosynthetic and metabolic pathways, dietary assessment, and assessment of biological properties with potential for drug development are areas of active, ongoing research. This review is focused on the chemistry, biosynthesis, occurrence, analytical challenges, and bioactivity recently reported for mono-, di-, tri-, and tetraCQAs.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Antioxidants/chemistry , Cognitive Dysfunction/prevention & control , Neuroprotective Agents/chemistry , Phytochemicals/chemistry , Plants, Medicinal/chemistry , Quinic Acid/analogs & derivatives , Acyltransferases/genetics , Acyltransferases/metabolism , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/metabolism , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/metabolism , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Biosynthetic Pathways , Brachypodium/enzymology , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Ipomoea batatas/enzymology , Mixed Function Oxygenases/genetics , Mixed Function Oxygenases/metabolism , Neuroprotective Agents/metabolism , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Phytochemicals/metabolism , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Plant Proteins/genetics , Plant Proteins/metabolism , Quinic Acid/chemistry , Quinic Acid/metabolism , Quinic Acid/pharmacology , Terminology as Topic
6.
Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol ; 43(3): 309-318, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242073

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Depression affects people feeling to be anxious, worried, and restless. They also lose interest in activities, concentrating and appetite, they finally may attempt suicide. Depression is the second chronic disease, as a source of the global burden of disease, after heart disease. Its prevalence elevated seven times during the COVID-19. AIM: The current study was designed to evaluate camphor neuroprotective role against rats' ciprofloxacin-induced depression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Depression was induced by administration of ciprofloxacin (50 mg/kg; orally) for 21 days. Wister albino male rats were divided into five groups. Group I (normal control): rats were given normal saline. Group II: rats received camphor (10 mg/kg; i.p.) for 21 days. Group III (depression control): rats received ciprofloxacin only. Groups IV and V: rats received camphor (5 and 10 mg/kg; i.p.) for 21 days concurrent with ciprofloxacin. Behavior tests as forced swimming test, activity cage, and rotarod were estimated. Oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarkers as malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), catalase, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) besides inflammatory biomarkers as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) as well as neurotransmitters were determined. Finally, histopathological examination was done. RESULTS: Camphor increased catalase and Nrf-2 activities, decreased NO, MDA, TNF-α, TLR4 serum levels, and elevating brain contents of serotonin, dopamine, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) and P190-RHO GTP protein with normal neuronal cells of the frontal cortex. CONCLUSION: Camphor has neuroprotective effect via modulation of Nrf-2 and TLR4 against ciprofloxacin-induced depression in rats.


Subject(s)
Camphor/pharmacology , Ciprofloxacin/adverse effects , Depression , NF-E2-Related Factor 2/metabolism , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Toll-Like Receptor 4/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Ciprofloxacin/pharmacology , Depression/chemically induced , Depression/drug therapy , Depression/metabolism , Male , Rats , Rats, Wistar , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism
7.
Brain ; 144(10): 2915-2932, 2021 11 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238183

ABSTRACT

Neurodegenerative proteinopathies are characterized by progressive cell loss that is preceded by the mislocalization and aberrant accumulation of proteins prone to aggregation. Despite their different physiological functions, disease-related proteins like tau, α-synuclein, TAR DNA binding protein-43, fused in sarcoma and mutant huntingtin, all share low complexity regions that can mediate their liquid-liquid phase transitions. The proteins' phase transitions can range from native monomers to soluble oligomers, liquid droplets and further to irreversible, often-mislocalized aggregates that characterize the stages and severity of neurodegenerative diseases. Recent advances into the underlying pathogenic mechanisms have associated mislocalization and aberrant accumulation of disease-related proteins with defective nucleocytoplasmic transport and its mediators called karyopherins. These studies identify karyopherin abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and synucleinopathies including Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, that range from altered expression levels to the subcellular mislocalization and aggregation of karyopherin α and ß proteins. The reported findings reveal that in addition to their classical function in nuclear import and export, karyopherins can also act as chaperones by shielding aggregation-prone proteins against misfolding, accumulation and irreversible phase-transition into insoluble aggregates. Karyopherin abnormalities can, therefore, be both the cause and consequence of protein mislocalization and aggregate formation in degenerative proteinopathies. The resulting vicious feedback cycle of karyopherin pathology and proteinopathy identifies karyopherin abnormalities as a common denominator of onset and progression of neurodegenerative disease. Pharmacological targeting of karyopherins, already in clinical trials as therapeutic intervention targeting cancers such as glioblastoma and viral infections like COVID-19, may therefore represent a promising new avenue for disease-modifying treatments in neurodegenerative proteinopathies.


Subject(s)
Karyopherins/metabolism , Neurodegenerative Diseases/metabolism , Proteostasis Deficiencies/metabolism , Animals , Brain/drug effects , Brain/metabolism , Humans , Karyopherins/genetics , Neurodegenerative Diseases/drug therapy , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use , Proteostasis Deficiencies/drug therapy
8.
Molecules ; 25(22)2020 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917015

ABSTRACT

Flavonoids are phytochemical compounds present in many plants, fruits, vegetables, and leaves, with potential applications in medicinal chemistry. Flavonoids possess a number of medicinal benefits, including anticancer, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral properties. They also have neuroprotective and cardio-protective effects. These biological activities depend upon the type of flavonoid, its (possible) mode of action, and its bioavailability. These cost-effective medicinal components have significant biological activities, and their effectiveness has been proved for a variety of diseases. The most recent work is focused on their isolation, synthesis of their analogs, and their effects on human health using a variety of techniques and animal models. Thousands of flavonoids have been successfully isolated, and this number increases steadily. We have therefore made an effort to summarize the isolated flavonoids with useful activities in order to gain a better understanding of their effects on human health.


Subject(s)
Flavonoids/chemistry , Flavonoids/pharmacology , Alzheimer Disease/drug therapy , Alzheimer Disease/prevention & control , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/chemistry , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antifungal Agents/chemistry , Antifungal Agents/pharmacology , Antimalarials/chemistry , Antimalarials/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cardiovascular System/drug effects , Flavonoids/economics , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/chemistry , Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology , Mice , Nervous System/drug effects , Neurons/drug effects , Neuroprotective Agents/chemistry , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Leaves/chemistry , Plants/chemistry , Polyphenols/chemistry , Polyphenols/pharmacology , Quercetin/chemistry , Quercetin/pharmacology , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Rats, Wistar , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/prevention & control
9.
Drug Discov Today ; 26(6): 1473-1481, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1086904

ABSTRACT

The novel respiratory virus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), emerged during late 2019 and spread rapidly across the world. It is now recognised that the nervous system can be affected in COVID-19, with several studies reporting long-term cognitive problems in patients. The metabolic pathway of tryptophan degradation, known as the kynurenine pathway (KP), is significantly activated in patients with COVID-19. KP metabolites have roles in regulating both inflammatory/immune responses and neurological functions. In this review, we speculate on the effects of KP activation in patients with COVID-19, and how modulation of this pathway might impact inflammation and reduce neurological symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognition , Inflammation/metabolism , Kynurenine/metabolism , Sulfonamides/pharmacology , Thiazoles/pharmacology , Tryptophan/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/psychology , Cognition/drug effects , Cognition/physiology , Humans , Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase/antagonists & inhibitors , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Signal Transduction
11.
Eur J Pharmacol ; 889: 173629, 2020 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023556

ABSTRACT

The absence of a specific treatment for SARS-CoV-2 infection led to an intense global effort in order to find new therapeutic interventions and improve patient outcomes. One important feature of COVID-19 pathophysiology is the activation of immune cells, with consequent massive production and release of inflammatory mediators that may cause impairment of several organ functions, including the brain. In addition to its classical role as a neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has immunomodulatory properties, downregulating the inflammatory response by central and peripheral mechanisms. In this review, we describe the roles of 5-HT in the regulation of systemic inflammation and the potential benefits of the use of specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors as a coadjutant therapy to attenuate neurological complications of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Inflammation/drug therapy , Nervous System Diseases/drug therapy , Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use , Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Nervous System Diseases/complications , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors/pharmacology
12.
Neuromolecular Med ; 23(1): 184-198, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-871558

ABSTRACT

Ergothioneine (ET) is a naturally occurring antioxidant that is synthesized by non-yeast fungi and certain bacteria. ET is not synthesized by animals, including humans, but is avidly taken up from the diet, especially from mushrooms. In the current study, we elucidated the effect of ET on the hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cell line. Endothelial cells are exposed to high levels of the cholesterol oxidation product, 7-ketocholesterol (7KC), in patients with cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and this process is thought to mediate pathological inflammation. 7KC induces a dose-dependent loss of cell viability and an increase in apoptosis and necrosis in the endothelial cells. A relocalization of the tight junction proteins, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5, towards the nucleus of the cells was also observed. These effects were significantly attenuated by ET. In addition, 7KC induces marked increases in the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1ß IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), as well as COX2 enzymatic activity, and these were significantly reduced by ET. Moreover, the cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of ET were significantly reduced by co-incubation with an inhibitor of the ET transporter, OCTN1 (VHCL). This shows that ET needs to enter the endothelial cells to have a protective effect and is unlikely to act via extracellular neutralizing of 7KC. The protective effect on inflammation in brain endothelial cells suggests that ET might be useful as a nutraceutical for the prevention or management of neurovascular diseases, such as stroke and vascular dementia. Moreover, the ability of ET to cross the blood-brain barrier could point to its usefulness in combatting 7KC that is produced in the CNS during neuroinflammation, e.g. after excitotoxicity, in chronic neurodegenerative diseases, and possibly COVID-19-related neurologic complications.


Subject(s)
Antioxidants/pharmacology , COVID-19/complications , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Ergothioneine/pharmacology , Ketocholesterols/toxicity , Nervous System Diseases/prevention & control , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacokinetics , Apoptosis/drug effects , Biological Transport , Blood-Brain Barrier , Brain/blood supply , Brain/cytology , Cell Line , Cholesterol/metabolism , Claudin-5 , Cyclooxygenase 2/biosynthesis , Cyclooxygenase 2/genetics , Cytokines/biosynthesis , Cytokines/genetics , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Ergothioneine/pharmacokinetics , Humans , Microvessels/cytology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacokinetics , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/metabolism , Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III/metabolism , Organic Cation Transport Proteins , RNA, Messenger/biosynthesis , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Symporters , Zonula Occludens-1 Protein
13.
Cell Mol Neurobiol ; 42(3): 489-500, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706891

ABSTRACT

The world faces an exceptional new public health concern caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), subsequently termed the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) by the World Health Organization (WHO). Although the clinical symptoms mostly have been characterized, the scientific community still doesn´t know how SARS-CoV-2 successfully reaches and spreads throughout the central nervous system (CNS) inducing brain damage. The recent detection of SARS-CoV-2 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in frontal lobe sections from postmortem examination has confirmed the presence of the virus in neural tissue. This finding reveals a new direction in the search for a neurotherapeutic strategy in the COVID-19 patients with underlying diseases. Here, we discuss the COVID-19 outbreak in a neuroinvasiveness context and suggest the therapeutic use of high doses of melatonin, which may favorably modulate the immune response and neuroinflammation caused by SARS-CoV-2. However, clinical trials elucidating the efficacy of melatonin in the prevention and clinical management in the COVID-19 patients should be actively encouraged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Central Nervous System/virology , Melatonin/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , Brain/drug effects , Brain/pathology , Brain/virology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/pathology , Central Nervous System/drug effects , Central Nervous System/pathology , Central Nervous System Agents/pharmacology , Central Nervous System Agents/therapeutic use , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/drug therapy , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/pathology , Humans , Melatonin/pharmacology , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology , Neuroprotective Agents/therapeutic use
14.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 20(1): 241, 2020 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-692710

ABSTRACT

Several flavonoids have been recognized as nutraceuticals, and myricetin is a good example. Myricetin is commonly found in plants and their antimicrobial and antioxidant activities is well demonstrated. One of its beneficial biological effects is the neuroprotective activity, showing preclinical activities on Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington diseases, and even in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Also, myricetin has revealed other biological activities, among them as antidiabetic, anticancer, immunomodulatory, cardiovascular, analgesic and antihypertensive. However, few clinical trials have been performed using myricetin as nutraceutical. Thus, this review provides new insights on myricetin preclinical pharmacological activities, and role in selected clinical trials.


Subject(s)
Dietary Supplements , Flavonoids/chemistry , Flavonoids/pharmacology , Anti-Infective Agents/chemistry , Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/chemistry , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/chemistry , Hypoglycemic Agents/pharmacology , Molecular Structure , Neuroprotective Agents/chemistry , Neuroprotective Agents/pharmacology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL