Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Neuron ; 109(20): 3193-3195, 2021 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472107

ABSTRACT

In an interview with Neuron, Greg Stuart discusses the COVID-19 pandemic effects on the Australian research landscape and recounts how early influencers shaped him as both a neuroscientist and mentor.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Medical Laboratory Science/methods , Mentors/education , Neurosciences/education , Neurosciences/methods , Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Male
2.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 83(4): 1563-1601, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468319

ABSTRACT

Neurological disorders significantly impact the world's economy due to their often chronic and life-threatening nature afflicting individuals which, in turn, creates a global disease burden. The Group of Twenty (G20) member nations, which represent the largest economies globally, should come together to formulate a plan on how to overcome this burden. The Neuroscience-20 (N20) initiative of the Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics (SBMT) is at the vanguard of this global collaboration to comprehensively raise awareness about brain, spine, and mental disorders worldwide. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of the various brain initiatives worldwide and highlight the need for cooperation and recommend ways to bring down costs associated with the discovery and treatment of neurological disorders. Our systematic search revealed that the cost of neurological and psychiatric disorders to the world economy by 2030 is roughly $16T. The cost to the economy of the United States is $1.5T annually and growing given the impact of COVID-19. We also discovered there is a shortfall of effective collaboration between nations and a lack of resources in developing countries. Current statistical analyses on the cost of neurological disorders to the world economy strongly suggest that there is a great need for investment in neurotechnology and innovation or fast-tracking therapeutics and diagnostics to curb these costs. During the current COVID-19 pandemic, SBMT, through this paper, intends to showcase the importance of worldwide collaborations to reduce the population's economic and health burden, specifically regarding neurological/brain, spine, and mental disorders.


Subject(s)
Global Burden of Disease , International Cooperation , Mental Disorders , Nervous System Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Burden of Disease/organization & administration , Global Burden of Disease/trends , Global Health/economics , Global Health/trends , Humans , Mental Disorders/economics , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Nervous System Diseases/economics , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Neurosciences/methods , Neurosciences/trends , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(2): 100-106, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117146

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted many aspects of neuroscience research. At the 2020 Society of Neuroscience in Anesthesiology and Critical Care (SNACC) Annual Meeting, the SNACC Research Committee met virtually to discuss research challenges encountered during the COVID-19 pandemic along with possible strategies for facilitating research activities. These challenges and recommendations are included in this Consensus Statement. The objectives are to: (1) provide an overview of the disruptions and challenges to neuroscience research caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and; (2) put forth a set of consensus recommendations for strengthening research sustainability during and beyond the current pandemic. Specific recommendations are highlighted for adapting laboratory and human subject study activities to optimize safety. Complementary research activities are also outlined for both laboratory and clinical researchers if specific investigations are impossible because of regulatory or societal changes. The role of virtual platforms is discussed with respect to fostering new collaborations, scheduling research meetings, and holding conferences such that scientific collaboration and exchange of ideas can continue. Our hope is for these recommendations to serve as a valuable resource for investigators in the neurosciences and other research disciplines for current and future research disruptions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Neurosciences/methods , Research , Consensus , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical
4.
Neuron ; 109(4): 571-575, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087172

ABSTRACT

Recent research resolves the challenging problem of building biophysically plausible spiking neural models that are also capable of complex information processing. This advance creates new opportunities in neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering, which we discussed at an online focus meeting.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Engineering/trends , Models, Neurological , Neural Networks, Computer , Neurosciences/trends , Biomedical Engineering/methods , Forecasting , Humans , Neurons/physiology , Neurosciences/methods
5.
Nature ; 589(7843): 630-632, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1049956
8.
J Psychiatr Res ; 130: 215-217, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713999

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by SARS-CoV-2, is a disaster due to not only its psychosocial impact but it also to its direct effects on the brain. The latest evidence suggests it has neuroinvasive mechanisms, in addition to neurological manifestations, and as seen in past pandemics, long-term sequelae are expected. Specific and well-structured interventions are necessary, and that's why it's important to ensure a continuity between primary care, emergency medicine, and psychiatry. Evidence shows that 2003 SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) survivors developed persistent psychiatric comorbidities after the infection, in addition to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. A proper stratification of patients according not only to psychosocial factors but also an inflammatory panel and SARS-Cov-2's direct effects on the central nervous system (CNS) and the immune system, may improve outcomes. The complexity of COVID-19's pathology and the impact on the brain requires appropriate screening that has to go beyond the psychosocial impact, taking into account how stress and neuroinflammation affects the brain. This is a call for a clinical multidisciplinary approach to treat and prevent Sars-Cov-2 mental health sequelae.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/psychology , Neurosciences/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , COVID-19 , Encephalitis/complications , Encephalitis/prevention & control , Encephalitis/psychology , Humans , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Physiological
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL