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1.
Neuron ; 109(19): 3022-3024, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482840

ABSTRACT

In this Neuron Q&A, Xiang Yu talks about the stress and anxiety brought to the lab by the pandemic, the new opportunities for teaching and scientific conferences it created, the value of the individual, and the social responsibility of science for humanity and society to shape a brighter future.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences/trends , Beijing , COVID-19 , China , History, 21st Century , Pandemics , Research Support as Topic
2.
Neuron ; 109(19): 3034-3035, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482839

ABSTRACT

In this meeting report, I applaud the Neuromatch community, which runs virtual summer schools and conferences in response to the pandemic. Its members love science, aim to advance our understanding of the brain, and work extremely hard to include everyone.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences/education , Videoconferencing , COVID-19 , Neurosciences/trends , Pandemics , Teaching
3.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 83(4): 1563-1601, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468319

ABSTRACT

Neurological disorders significantly impact the world's economy due to their often chronic and life-threatening nature afflicting individuals which, in turn, creates a global disease burden. The Group of Twenty (G20) member nations, which represent the largest economies globally, should come together to formulate a plan on how to overcome this burden. The Neuroscience-20 (N20) initiative of the Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics (SBMT) is at the vanguard of this global collaboration to comprehensively raise awareness about brain, spine, and mental disorders worldwide. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of the various brain initiatives worldwide and highlight the need for cooperation and recommend ways to bring down costs associated with the discovery and treatment of neurological disorders. Our systematic search revealed that the cost of neurological and psychiatric disorders to the world economy by 2030 is roughly $16T. The cost to the economy of the United States is $1.5T annually and growing given the impact of COVID-19. We also discovered there is a shortfall of effective collaboration between nations and a lack of resources in developing countries. Current statistical analyses on the cost of neurological disorders to the world economy strongly suggest that there is a great need for investment in neurotechnology and innovation or fast-tracking therapeutics and diagnostics to curb these costs. During the current COVID-19 pandemic, SBMT, through this paper, intends to showcase the importance of worldwide collaborations to reduce the population's economic and health burden, specifically regarding neurological/brain, spine, and mental disorders.


Subject(s)
Global Burden of Disease , International Cooperation , Mental Disorders , Nervous System Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Burden of Disease/organization & administration , Global Burden of Disease/trends , Global Health/economics , Global Health/trends , Humans , Mental Disorders/economics , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Nervous System Diseases/economics , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Neurosciences/methods , Neurosciences/trends , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Neuron ; 109(19): 3013-3014, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457252
5.
Neuron ; 109(19): 3031-3033, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457251

ABSTRACT

In this Neuron Q&A, Alejandro Schinder highlights the value of basic science in paving the way for the rapid development of vaccines and diagnostic tools. He discusses the special challenges faced in lower-income countries and how his lab has created resources for helping each other navigate lockdown and maintain good spirits.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences/trends , COVID-19 , Congresses as Topic , Efficiency , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Pandemics , Students
6.
Neuron ; 109(19): 3028-3030, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457250

ABSTRACT

In an interview with Neuron, Inbal Goshen discusses a challenging year, managing a research program through her own serious health scare, and a global pandemic. She offers advice for young scientists and expresses admiration for a role model she never met in person.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences/trends , COVID-19 , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Mentors , Pandemics , Teaching , Work-Life Balance
7.
Neuron ; 109(19): 3015-3017, 2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457247

ABSTRACT

Indira Raman reflects on what science has offered through the pandemic and social upheaval of last year. In this Neuron Q&A, she highlights how the scientific method can enrich all aspects of our lives and inform our worldview.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences/education , Neurosciences/trends , COVID-19 , History, 21st Century , Humans , Pandemics , Research , Work-Life Balance
8.
Neuron ; 109(4): 571-575, 2021 02 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087172

ABSTRACT

Recent research resolves the challenging problem of building biophysically plausible spiking neural models that are also capable of complex information processing. This advance creates new opportunities in neuroscience and neuromorphic engineering, which we discussed at an online focus meeting.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Engineering/trends , Models, Neurological , Neural Networks, Computer , Neurosciences/trends , Biomedical Engineering/methods , Forecasting , Humans , Neurons/physiology , Neurosciences/methods
9.
Nature ; 589(7843): 630-632, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1049956
10.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 16(12): e1008485, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992643

ABSTRACT

The increased democratization of the creation, implementation, and attendance of academic conferences has been a serendipitous benefit of the movement toward virtual meetings. The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has accelerated the transition to online conferences and, in parallel, their democratization, by necessity. This manifests not just in the mitigation of barriers to attending traditional physical conferences but also in the presentation of new, and more importantly attainable, opportunities for young scientists to carve out a niche in the landscape of academic meetings. Here, we describe an early "proof of principle" of this democratizing power via our experience organizing the Canadian Computational Neuroscience Spotlight (CCNS; crowdcast.io/e/CCNS), a free 2-day virtual meeting that was built entirely amid the pandemic using only virtual tools. While our experience was unique considering the obstacles faced in creating a conference during a pandemic, this was not the only factor differentiating both our experience and the resulting meeting from other contemporary online conferences. Specifically, CCNS was crafted entirely by early career researchers (ECRs) without any sponsors or partners, advertised primarily using social media and "word of mouth," and designed specifically to highlight and engage trainees. From this experience, we have distilled "10 simple rules" as a blueprint for the design of new virtual academic meetings, especially in the absence of institutional support or partnerships, in this unprecedented environment. By highlighting the lessons learned in implementing our meeting under these arduous circumstances, we hope to encourage other young scientists to embrace this challenge, which would serve as a critical next step in further democratizing academic meetings.


Subject(s)
Neurosciences/education , Neurosciences/trends , Social Media , Telecommunications , Brain/pathology , COVID-19 , Canada , Computational Biology , Congresses as Topic , Humans , International Cooperation , Internet , Oscillometry , Pandemics , Universities
11.
World Neurosurg ; 139: 344-354, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-438350

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has recently been designated a pandemic by the World Health Organization, affecting 2.7 million individuals globally as of April 25, 2020, with more than 187,000 deaths. An increasing body of evidence has supported central nervous system involvement. METHODS: We conducted a review of the reported data for studies concerning COVID-19 pathophysiology, neurological manifestations, and neuroscience provider recommendations and guidelines. RESULTS: Central nervous system manifestations range from vague nonfocal complaints to severe neurological impairment associated with encephalitis. It is unclear whether the neurological dysfunction results from direct viral injury or systemic disease. The virus could affect brainstem pathways that lead to indirect respiratory dysfunction, in addition to direct pulmonary injury. Necessary adaptations in patient management, triage, and diagnosis are evolving in light of the ongoing scientific and clinical findings. CONCLUSIONS: The present review has consolidated the current body of data regarding the neurological impact of coronaviruses, discussed the reported neurological manifestations of COVID-19, and highlighted the recommendations for patient management. Specific recommendations pertaining to clinical practice for neurologists and neurosurgeons have also been provided.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Neurosciences/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
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