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3.
World Neurosurg ; 159: e466-e478, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586256

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine factors associated with anxiety and depression among neurosurgeons after vaccination during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: An online survey was completed by neurosurgeons worldwide over 4 weeks. Depression in neurosurgeons was assessed by the 20-item self-reporting questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 534 responses were received and analyzed. Almost half of the respondents were from Asia (50.9%), followed by Europe (38.8%). The majority of the respondents were <40 years old (88%), and almost two thirds were trainees (62.2%). Half of the respondents worked in departments with <40 beds (50.7%), and the majority were practicing in the private sector (72.5%). Most of the respondents (85.8%) had COVID-19-positive colleagues in their department, and 64% had exposure to a COVID-19-positive colleague, family member, and/or patient. More than half of the respondents were exposed to infected patients and/or colleagues, and almost half (43.1%) underwent COVID-19 testing when exposed. Nearly half of the respondents underwent COVID-19 testing more than twice (52.4%). Of respondents, 83% had received at least the first dose of the vaccine. The odds of depression among vaccinated respondents were found to be significantly less than among unvaccinated respondents in the univariable model. CONCLUSIONS: Among health care workers, neurosurgeons are one of the groups indirectly affected by the pandemic. Adaptation to the new normal and advent of vaccines is speculated to control psychological distress among all groups of health care workers, including neurosurgeons. We found that odds of depression among vaccinated people were lower than among people who were not vaccinated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Neurosurgeons , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
World Neurosurg ; 150: e790-e793, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517507

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global burden of neurosurgical disease is substantial, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Medical conferences are important in connecting those from LMICs to those from high-income countries for support and serve as an educational and networking tool. In this study, we sought to quantitatively assess the incorporation of global neurosurgery topics in international conferences related to the neurosurgical specialty. METHODS: A database of major international neurosurgical conferences, from the conference of a group of 9 major neurosurgical societies, that had global neurosurgery featured from 2015 to 2020 was created. We then did a retrospective analysis to study the characteristics of these conferences ranging from geographic location to number to different components of the conferences. RESULTS: There was an increase in the number of conferences with global neurosurgery since 2015. This, in addition to the occurrence of 3 wholly global neurosurgery-related conferences in recent years, is promising and suggests growth in the field. However, 52.6% of conferences took place in North American or European countries, the majority of which were high-income countries. Furthermore, a majority of the presence of global neurosurgery was in the form of individual talks (54.5%) as opposed to plenaries or sessions. CONCLUSIONS: The preponderance of conferences in North America and Europe can pose barriers for those from LMICs including travel time, expenses, and visa problems. As global neurosurgery becomes an increasing part of the global health movement, we hope that these barriers are addressed. Conferences may become an even stronger tool to promote equity in neurosurgical education and practice.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic/trends , Global Health/trends , Internationality , Neurosurgeons/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Cohort Studies , Humans , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Retrospective Studies
5.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord ; 92: 41-45, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1472127

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The initial COVID-19 pandemic shutdown led to the canceling of elective surgeries throughout most of the USA and Canada. OBJECTIVE: This survey was carried out on behalf of the Parkinson Study Group (PSG) to understand the impact of the shutdown on deep brain stimulation (DBS) practices in North America. METHODS: A survey was distributed through RedCap® to the members of the PSG Functional Neurosurgical Working Group. Only one member from each site was asked to respond to the survey. Responses were collected from May 15 to June 6, 2020. RESULTS: Twenty-three sites participated; 19 (83%) sites were from the USA and 4 (17%) from Canada. Twenty-one sites were academic medical centers. COVID-19 associated DBS restrictions were in place from 4 to 16 weeks. One-third of sites halted preoperative evaluations, while two-thirds of the sites offered limited preoperative evaluations. Institutional policy was the main contributor for the reported practice changes, with 87% of the sites additionally reporting patient-driven surgical delays secondary to pandemic concerns. Pre-post DBS associated management changes affected preoperative assessments 96%; electrode placement 87%; new implantable pulse generator (IPG) placement 83%; IPG replacement 65%; immediate postoperative DBS programming 74%; and routine DBS programming 91%. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic related shutdown resulted in DBS practice changes in almost all North American sites who responded to this large survey. Information learned could inform development of future contingency plans to reduce patient delays in care under similar circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Deep Brain Stimulation/statistics & numerical data , Implantable Neurostimulators/statistics & numerical data , Movement Disorders/therapy , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Postoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Preoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Academic Medical Centers , Canada , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Neurologists/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgeons/statistics & numerical data , United States
6.
J Clin Neurosci ; 94: 18-23, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458265

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: While recent studies have focused on confirming satisfaction with telemedicine during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) era, we leveraged a novel survey instrument to identify associations between patient experience and telemedicine-specific factors such as device selection, audio/visual resolution, and connection stability. METHODS: Telemedicine visit data were gathered from our institution between June 22, 2020 and February 14, 2021. Each patient indicated their overall visit score, likelihood-to-recommend (LTR) score, and device used for the encounter. Remaining questions were randomly distributed to patients to ensure equal distribution across respondents. RESULTS: Over 34 weeks, there were 901 unique neurosurgical telemedicine visits linked to a post-visit survey at our institution. The LTR top box score percentage showed no significant change across 34 weeks (p = 0.218). After adjusting across available covariates, patients who experienced wait times exceeding 20 min were significantly less likely to report high overall scores (aOR: 0.12; 95% CI: 0.03-0.41; p = 0.001). Patients who indicated they were less able to understand the provider (aOR: 0.22; 95% CI: 0.07-0.66; p = 0.007), or who indicated the provider was not able to properly see them (aOR: 0.11; 95% CI: 0.03-0.43; p = 0.002) were associated with substantially lower overall scores. Visits with interrupted connectivity or those forced to move to a regular phone call were not important predictors of overall score. CONCLUSIONS: In the largest description of patient satisfaction with telemedicine in the neurosurgical setting during the COVID-19 era, we identified timely and high-quality physician-patient visualization and communication as among the most important predictors of patient satisfaction in virtual settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Communication , Humans , Neurosurgeons , Patient Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2
8.
World Neurosurg ; 154: e428-e436, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440405

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a detrimental effect on residents' operative training. Our aim was to identify the proportion of procedures performed by residents across 2 neurosurgical centers (1 in the United Kingdom and 1 in Germany) during the pandemic-affected months of March 2020-May 2020, inclusive, compared with March 2019-May 2019, inclusive. METHODS: All neurosurgical procedures performed at the United Kingdom and German institutions, between March 1, 2019 and May 31, 2019 (pre-COVID months) and March 1, 2020 and May 31, 2020 (COVID months), were extracted and operative notes evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed on SPSS version 22. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant reduction in operative volume in the United Kingdom center from the pre-COVID months to the COVID months (χ2(5) = 84.917; P < 0.001) but no significant difference in the operative volume in the German center (P = 0.61). A Mann-Whitney U test showed a statistically significant difference in the volume of residents operating in the COVID months compared with pre-COVID months in both United Kingdom and German centers (P < 0.001). The average number of procedures performed by residents in the United Kingdom center as the primary surgeon decreased from 82 to 72 per month (pre-COVID vs. COVID months), whereas German residents' operating volume increased from 68 to 89 per month (pre-COVID vs. COVID months). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly reduced the volume of operating by neurosurgical residents in the United Kingdom center, whereas residents in the German center performed more procedures compared with 2019. This finding may reflect variations in national practice on maintaining surgical activities and provision of critical care beds during the first wave of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Neurosurgery/education , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Education, Medical, Graduate , Female , Germany , Humans , Infant , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Neurosurgeons , Retrospective Studies , United Kingdom , Young Adult
9.
World Neurosurg ; 155: e576-e587, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386731

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) crisis led to many restrictions in daily life and protective health care actions in all hospitals to ensure basic medical supply. This questionnaire-based study among spinal surgeons in central Europe was generated to investigate the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and consecutively the differences in restrictions in spinal surgery units. METHODS: An online survey consisting of 32 questions on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the related restrictions on spinal surgery units was created. Surgical fellows and consultants from neurosurgical, orthopedic, and trauma departments were included in our questionnaire-based study with the help of Austrian, German, and Swiss scientific societies. RESULTS: In a total of 406 completed questionnaires, most participants reported increased preventive measurements at daily clinical work (split-team work schedule [44%], cancellation of elective and/or semielective surgeries [91%]), reduced occurrence of emergencies (91%), decreased outpatient work (45%) with increased telemedical care (73%) and a reduced availability of medical equipment (75%) as well as medical staff (30%). Although most physicians considered the political restrictive decisions to be not suitable, most considered the medical measures to be appropriate. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in comparable restrictive measures for spinal surgical departments in central Europe. Elective surgical interventions were reduced, providing additional resources reserved for severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2-positive patients. Although similar restrictions were introduced in most participants' departments, the supply of personal protective equipment and the outpatient care remained insufficient and should be re-evaluated intensively for future global health care crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurosurgeons/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Spinal Diseases/epidemiology , Spinal Diseases/surgery , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/trends
10.
Childs Nerv Syst ; 37(10): 3083-3087, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370385

ABSTRACT

With respect to the tremendous deficit in surgical care plaguing developing nations, it is critical that medical outreach models be organized in such a fashion that sustainable advancements can be durably imparted beyond the duration of targeted missions. Using a didactic framework focused on empowering host neurosurgeons with an enhanced surgical skillset, a mission was launched in Managua, Nicaragua, after previous success in Kiev, Ukraine, and Lima, Peru. Unfortunately, the failure to critically assess the internal and external state of affairs of the region's medical center compromised the outreach mission. Herein lies the visiting team's lessons from failure and insights on facilitating effective communication with host institutions, circumventing geopolitical instability, and utilizing digital collaboration and video-conferencing tools in the post-COVID-19 era to advance the surgical care of developing regions in a fashion that can be generationally felt.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery , Humans , Neurosurgeons , Nicaragua , SARS-CoV-2
11.
World Neurosurg ; 154: e781-e789, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347859

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility, patient/provider satisfaction, and perceived value of telehealth spine consultation after rapid conversion from traditional in-office visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Data were obtained for patients undergoing telehealth visits with spine surgeons in the first 3 weeks after government restriction of elective surgical care at 4 sites (March 23, 2020, to April 17, 2020). Demographic factors, technique-specific elements of the telehealth experience, provider confidence in diagnostic and therapeutic assessment, patient/surgeon satisfaction, and perceived value were collected. RESULTS: A total of 128 unique visits were analyzed. New (74 [58%]), preoperative (26 [20%]), and postoperative (28 [22%]) patients were assessed. A total of 116 (91%) visits had successful connection on the first attempt. Surgeons felt very confident 101 times (79%) when assessing diagnosis and 107 times (84%) when assessing treatment plan. The mean and median patient satisfaction was 89% and 94%, respectively. Patient satisfaction was significantly higher for video over audio-only visits (P < 0.05). Patient satisfaction was not significantly different with patient age, location of chief complaint (cervical or thoracolumbar), or visit type (new, preoperative, or postoperative). Providers reported that 76% of the time they would choose to perform the visit again in telehealth format. Sixty percent of patients valued the visit cost as the same or slightly less than an in-office consultation. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to demonstrate the feasibility and high patient/provider satisfaction of virtual spine surgical consultation, and appropriate reimbursement and balanced regulation for spine telehealth care is essential to continue this existing work.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Feasibility Studies , Neurosurgeons , Pandemics , Physical Examination/methods , Spinal Diseases/diagnosis , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Attitude of Health Personnel , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Postoperative Care , Preoperative Care
12.
J Clin Neurosci ; 91: 125-130, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300914

ABSTRACT

The advent of the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted all aspects of neurosurgery education, and it is now challenging to conduct routine sessions. Maintenance of essential standard education among novice neurosurgeons during the pandemic is of paramount importance. The aim of this study was the development of virtual modules and validation of its role to supplement the neurosurgery education program. We developed the virtual modules relevant to neuro-anatomy, neurosurgical procedures, instrumentation, and neurosurgical planning. These modules were virtually demonstrated to twenty-seven resident neurosurgeons through CiscoWebexonline platform. They provided their rating on the aptness of virtual modules for different neurosurgery applications on various parameters using 10 points Likert scale. The parameters included quality, learning, confidence building capacity, usefulness, and overall satisfaction. The results obtained for each module were analysed and the average score was used for the comparison. The highest rating on quality was obtained by the neurosurgical instrumentation module. The highest rating for learning and confidence building capacity was given to neurosurgical procedure animation. The usefulness and overall satisfaction were highly rated for neurosurgical planning module. The results show that developed virtual modules provide an effective method to supplement the neurosurgery education program in the current scenario involving physical distancing and shift rearrangements. These virtual modules help in limiting the visits to operation room, anatomy and surgical training labs, and allow residents to learn online at their pace.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery , Humans , Neurosurgeons , Neurosurgical Procedures , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Neurosurgery ; 89(3): 364-371, 2021 08 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270746

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine has received increased attention in recent years as a potential solution to expand clinical capability and patient access to care in many fields, including neurosurgery. Although patient and physician attitudes are rapidly shifting toward greater telemedicine use in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, there remains uncertainty about telemedicine's regulatory future. Despite growing evidence of telemedicine's utility, there remain a number of significant medicolegal barriers to its mass adoption and wider implementation. Herein, we examine recent progress in state and federal regulations in the United States governing telemedicine's implementation in quality of care, finance and billing, privacy and confidentiality, risk and liability, and geography and interstate licensure, with special attention to how these concern teleneurosurgical practice. We also review contemporary topics germane to the future of teleneurosurgery, including the continued expansion of reciprocity in interstate licensure, expanded coverage for homecare services for chronic conditions, expansion of Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services reimbursements, and protections of store-and-forward technologies. Additionally, we discuss recent successes in teleneurosurgery, stroke care, and rehabilitation as models for teleneurosurgical best practices. As telemedicine technology continues to mature and its expanse grows, neurosurgeons' familiarity with its benefits, limitations, and controversies will best allow for its successful adoption in our field to maximize patient care and outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Aged , Humans , Medicare , Neurosurgeons , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
14.
Neurology ; 96(20): e2558-e2560, 2021 05 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232452

ABSTRACT

Patients with traumatic brain injury may be dependent on the decision-making of their families. Restrictive visitation policies implemented during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic disproportionately affect these patients and their families. This narrative aims to illustrate this phenomenon and catalyze discussions regarding the need for careful evaluation of restrictive family visitation policies and exceptions that may be required for patients with brain injuries.


Subject(s)
Brain Injuries, Traumatic/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Care , Decision Making, Shared , Head Injuries, Penetrating/therapy , Visitors to Patients , Wounds, Gunshot/therapy , Adult , Critical Care/legislation & jurisprudence , Critical Care/psychology , Critical Care/standards , Glasgow Coma Scale , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Neurosurgeons , Palliative Care , Visitors to Patients/legislation & jurisprudence , Visitors to Patients/psychology
15.
World Neurosurg ; 153: e1-e10, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213564

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed health care delivery across the United States. Few analyses have specifically looked at quantifying the financial impact of the pandemic on practicing neurosurgeons. A survey analysis was performed to address this need. METHODS: A 19-question survey was distributed to practicing neurosurgeons in the United States and its territories. The questions evaluated respondents' assessments of changes in patient and procedural volume, salary and benefits, practice expenses, staffing, applications for government assistance, and stroke management. Responses were stratified by geographic region. RESULTS: The response rate was 5.1% (267/5224). Most respondents from each region noted a >50% decrease in clinic volume. Respondents from the Northeast observed a 76% decrease in procedure volume, which was significantly greater than that of other regions (P = 0.003). Northeast respondents were also significantly more likely to have been reassigned to nonneurosurgical clinical duties during the pandemic (P < 0.001). Most respondents also noted decreased salary and benefits but experienced no changes in overall practice expenses. Most respondents did not experience significant reductions in nursing or midlevel staffing. These trends were not significantly different between regions. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to decreases in patient and procedural volume and physician compensation despite stable practice expenses. Significantly more respondents in the Northeast region noted decreases in procedural volume and reassignment to nonneurosurgical COVID-related medical duties. Future analysis is necessary as the pandemic evolves and the long-term clinical and economic implications become clear.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/economics , Neurosurgeons/economics , Neurosurgery/economics , Personal Protective Equipment/economics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
16.
World Neurosurg ; 150: 153-160, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211169

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Present guidelines on reducing aerosol generation during neurosurgical procedures are futile. The aim of this article was to describe a novel device to contain aerosol within a small localized environment around the operative field-the negative pressure assisted microenvironment surgical hood (NEPA-MESH). METHODS: This device can be assembled using easily available materials-steel wires, image intensifier cover, surgical drape, and three-dimensional-printed self-locking copolyester double hoops. Large-bore pipes in continuity with a high-volume suction apparatus create a constant negative pressure microenvironment around the operative field. The CEM DT-9880 particle counter was used to estimate particle concentration inside the NEPA-MESH during various stages of a neurosurgical procedure as well as outside. The NEPA-MESH was tested in different craniotomies and endoscopic procedures. RESULTS: Mean particle concentration inside the NEPA-MESH and outside during drilling in various procedures was calculated and compared using unpaired t test. Significant reduction in particle concentrations was recorded for particles sized 0.3 µm (t = 17.55, P < 0.0001), 0.5 µm (t = 11.39, P < 0.0001), 1 µm (t = 6.36, P = 0.0002), 2.5 µm (t = 2.04, P = 0.074), 5.0 µm (t = 7.026, P = 0.0008), and 10 µm (t = 4.39, P = 0.0023). CONCLUSIONS: As definitive evidence demonstrating the presence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in aerosol particles is awaited, we describe a cost-effective strategy to reduce aerosol contamination. Significant reduction in particle concentrations was seen outside the NEPA-MESH compared with inside it during various stages of neurosurgical procedures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Neurosurgeons , Neurosurgery/methods , Personal Protective Equipment/economics , Aerosols , Air Pressure , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Craniotomy , Environmental Monitoring , Equipment Design , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/economics , Neuroendoscopy , Neurosurgery/economics , Surgical Drapes
17.
World Neurosurg ; 150: e182-e202, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169302

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has exerted a significant impact on health care workers. Recent studies have reported the detrimental effects of the pandemic on neurosurgery residents in North America, Asia, and Italy. However, the impact of the pandemic on neurosurgical training in Latin America and Spain has not yet been reported. In the present report, we describe effects of COVID-19 on training and working conditions of neurosurgery residents in these countries. METHODS: An electronic survey with 33 questions was sent to neurosurgery residents between September 7, 2020 and October 7, 2020. Statistical analysis was made in SPSS version 25. RESULTS: A total of 293 neurosurgery residents responded. The median age was 29.47 ± 2.6 years, and 79% (n = 231) were male. Of respondents, 36.5% (n = 107) were residents training from Mexico; 42% surveyed reported COVID symptoms and 2 (0.7%) received intensive care unit care; 61.4% of residents had been tested for COVID and 21.5% had a positive result; 84% of the respondents mentioned persisted with the same workload (≥70 hours per week) during the pandemic. Most residents from Mexico were assigned to management of patients with COVID compared with the rest of the countries (88% vs. 68.3%; P < 0.001), mainly in medical care (65.4% vs. 40.9%; P < 0.001), mechanical ventilators (16.8% vs. 5.9%; P = 0.003), and neurologic surgeries (94% vs. 83%; P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Our results offer a first glimpse of the changes imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic on neurosurgical work and training in Latin America and Spain, where health systems rely strongly on a resident workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/trends , Neurosurgery/education , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing , Critical Care , Female , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Latin America/epidemiology , Male , Neurosurgeons , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Ventilators, Mechanical , Workload , Young Adult
18.
Br J Neurosurg ; 35(5): 547-550, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147884

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a significant number of changes to elective and emergency neurosurgical practice.Materials and Methods: This paper reports the results of an online survey of Society of British Neurological Surgeons (SBNS) members undertaken between 10th and 24th of June 2020 regarding changes in consent practice in response to COVID-19, as well as the physical challenges experienced while operating under higher levels of personal protective equipment (PPE).Results: Despite the real and substantial risks associated with COVID-19, 23% of surgeons reported they were not made any changes to their usual consent process, and 54% of surgeons indicated that they made reference to COVID-19-associated risks in their written consent documentation. 93% of neurosurgeons reported physical difficulties operating using PPE; 62% reported visors/goggles fogging up, 55% experienced 'overheating', 62% reported fatigue, and 82% of surgeons reported difficulty communicating with the theatre staff.Conclusions: This survey highlights discrepancies in the consent practice between neurosurgeons which needs to be addressed at both local and national levels. The PPE being used in neurosurgical operations is not designed for use with specialist equipment (82% of respondents reported having to remove PPE to use the microscope) and the reported physical difficulties using PPE intraoperatively could significantly impact on both neurosurgeon performance and patient outcomes. This requires urgent attention by NHS procurement and management and should be urgently escalated to trust occupational health authorities as a workplace safety concern.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgeons , Humans , Neurosurgical Procedures , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
19.
World Neurosurg ; 148: 263-268, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144983

ABSTRACT

The mobilization of subspecialty departments in reaction to the unique demands of the onset of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in New York City was swift and left little time for reflection and commemoration. The early days of the pandemic brought unprecedented stressors on the medical system that necessitated a restructuring of hospitals, reallocation of health care workers, and a shift in care and education paradigms to meet patient care demands and public health needs. As the number of cases, intensive care unit patients, and deaths skyrocketed in New York City, many struggled with a somewhat paradoxical difficulty in perceiving the human value of what these numbers mean. Easily lost in the statistics are the stories and experiences of the physicians and trainees who were counted on to halt their own clinical practices and adapt their skillsets to tackle the pandemic. In this article, we present 10 brief narratives from the student members of the Neurosurgery Publication Group at Weill Cornell Medical College and members of the Weill Cornell Medicine Neurological Surgery Residency Program and Department of Neurological Surgery faculty. Reflecting on these individual experiences gives us an opportunity to simultaneously contribute to a history of New York City's reaction to COVID-19 and commemorate the individuals who were impacted by or succumbed to this disease.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Neurosurgeons , Neurosurgery/education , Students, Medical , Humans , New York City , SARS-CoV-2
20.
World Neurosurg ; 150: e645-e656, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142299

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Global use of telemedicine has increased rapidly during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to bridge the gap in existing health care services. Intercontinental trends in neurosurgeons' perception and practices of telemedicine have been sparingly reported. METHODS: We conducted an online anonymized and validated survey using a structured questionnaire to gain insight into neurosurgeons' experience with telemedicine across various continents and rated its usefulness on a 5-point Likert scale. RESULTS: We received 286 responses across 5 continents. There was a trend to support a major paradigm shift favoring teleconsultations during the COVID-19 pandemic in respondents from North America (P = 0.06). Signed prescriptions were e-mailed along with video-based teleconsultations preferentially in Europe and North America. In comparison, audio- or text-based teleconsultations along with unsigned prescriptions were prevalent in Asia and Africa (P = 0.0005). Acceptability and perceived usefulness for telemedicine during the pandemic were similar across the globe, regardless of neurosurgeons' experience (mean satisfaction score 3.72 ± 1.09; P = 0.62). A majority of neurosurgeons from Asia and South America complained of difficulties during teleconsultations owing to lack of appropriate infrastructure, internet connectivity/prescription-related issues, and potential risk of litigation (P = 0.0005). Approximately 46% of neurosurgeons, predominantly from Europe and North America, thought that telemedicine could play a vital role in clinical practice even after the COVID-19 pandemic subsides (mean satisfaction score 3.26 ± 1.16; P = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine in neurosurgery is a viable alternative to physical outpatient services during the COVID-19 pandemic and could potentially play a vital role after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery/trends , Pandemics , Remote Consultation/trends , Ambulatory Care , Humans , Internet , Neurosurgeons , Neurosurgery/economics , Neurosurgery/methods , Prescriptions , Remote Consultation/economics , Remote Consultation/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends
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