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1.
World Neurosurg ; 154: e370-e381, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440404

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has considerably affected surgical practice. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the pandemic on neurosurgical practice and the safety of the resumption of elective procedures through implementing screening protocols in a high-volume academic public center in Iran, as one of the countries severely affected by the pandemic. METHODS: This unmatched case-control study compared 2 populations of patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures between June 1, 2019 and September 1, 2019 and the same period in 2020. In the prospective part of the study, patients who underwent elective procedures were tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection postoperatively to evaluate the viability of our screening protocol. RESULTS: Elective and emergency procedures showed significant reduction during the pandemic (59.4%, n = 168 vs. 71.3%, n = 380) and increase (28.7%, n = 153 vs. 40.6%, n = 115, respectively; P = 0.003). The proportional distribution of neurosurgical categories remained unchanged during the pandemic. Poisson regression showed that the reduction in total daily admissions and some categories, including spine, trauma, oncology, and infection were significantly correlated with the pandemic. Among patients who underwent elective procedures, 0 (0.0%) and 26 (16.25%) had positive test results on days 30 and 60 postoperatively, respectively. Overall mortality was comparable between the pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 periods, yet patients with concurrent SARS-CoV-2 infection showed substantially higher mortality (65%). CONCLUSIONS: By implementing safety and screening protocols with proper resource allocation, the emergency care capacity can be maintained and the risk minimized of hospital-acquired SARS-CoV-2 infection, complications, and mortality among neurosurgical patients during the pandemic. Similarly, for elective procedures, according to available resources, hospital beds can be allocated for patients with a higher risk of delayed hospitalization and those who are concerned about the risk of hospital-acquired infection can be reassured.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19 Testing , Case-Control Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures/mortality , Feasibility Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Neurosurgical Procedures , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
2.
World Neurosurg ; 153: e481-e487, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303712

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social media has become ubiquitous in modern medicine. Academic neurosurgery has increased adoption to promote individual and departmental accomplishments, engage with patients, and foster collaboration. We sought to quantitatively evaluate the adoption of one of the most used social media platforms, Twitter, within academic neurosurgery. METHODS: A quantitative and qualitative analysis of Twitter use across 118 academic neurosurgery departments with residency programs in the United States was performed in March 2019 and March 2021. We collated Twitter handles, Doximity residency ranking (a peer-determined ranking system), geographic location, and Twitter demographics (tweets, followers, likes, and tweet content) from before and after the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Tweet content was characterized by reviewers over a predetermined 6-month period. Linear regression and parametric/nonparametric tests were used for analysis. RESULTS: Departmental accounts grew 3.7 accounts per year between 2009 and 2019 (R2 = 0.96), but 43 accounts (130%) were added between 2019 (n = 33) and 2021 (n = 76). This growth, coinciding with the COVID-19 pandemic, changed the model from linear to exponential growth (R2 = 0.97). The highest-ranking programs based on Doximity were significantly more likely to have an account (P < 0.001) and have more followers (P < 0.0001). Tweet content analysis revealed prioritization of faculty/resident activity (mean 49.9%) throughout the quartiles. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate rapid uptake in Twitter use among U.S. academic neurosurgical departments, accelerated by COVID-19. With the impact of COVID-19, it is clear that there will be continued rapid adoption of this platform within neurosurgery, and future studies should explore the outcomes of peer collaboration, patient engagement, and dissemination of medical information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/surgery , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgical Procedures , Social Media , Hospital Departments/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Information Dissemination/methods , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , United States
3.
J Clin Neurosci ; 88: 128-134, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1176834

ABSTRACT

Early COVID-19-targeted legislations reduced public activity and elective surgery such that local neurosurgical care greatly focused on emergent needs. This study examines neurosurgical trauma patients' dispositions through two neighboring trauma centers to inform resource allocation. We conducted a retrospective review of the trauma registries for two Level 1 Trauma Centers in Santa Clara County, one academic and one community center, between February 1st and April 15th, 2018-2020. Events before a quarantine, implemented on March 16th, 2020, and events from 2018 to 19 were used for reference. Encounters were characterized by injuries, services, procedures, and disposition. Categorical variables were analyzed by the χ2 test, proportions of variables by z-score test, and non-parametric variables by Fisher's exact test. A total of 1,336 traumas were identified, with 31% from the academic center and 69% from the community center. During the post-policy period, relative to matching periods in years prior, there was a decrease in number of TBI and spinal fractures (24% versus 41%, p < 0.001) and neurosurgical consults (27% versus 39%, p < 0.003), but not in number of neurosurgical admissions or procedures. There were no changes in frequency of neurosurgery consults among total traumas, patients triaged to critical care services, or patients discharged to temporary rehabilitation services. Neurosurgical services were similarly rendered between the academic and community hospitals. This study describes neurosurgical trauma management in a suburban healthcare network immediately following restrictive quarantine during a moderate COVID-19 outbreak. Our data shows that neurosurgery remains a resource-intensive subspeciality, even during restrictive periods when overall trauma volume is decreased.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery/trends , Pandemics , Quarantine , Trauma Centers/trends , Academic Medical Centers , Adult , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/epidemiology , Brain Injuries, Traumatic/surgery , California/epidemiology , Child , Community Health Centers , Female , Humans , Male , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Spinal Cord Injuries/epidemiology , Spinal Cord Injuries/surgery , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Wounds and Injuries/therapy
4.
Neurochirurgie ; 67(2): 99-103, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046196

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to relate the neurosurgical activity during a time of sanitary crisis such as experienced during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. METHODS: A monocentric retrospective analysis was made based on a prospectively gathered cohort of all patients requiring neurosurgical care between March 15th and May 12th, 2020. Local impact of SARS-CoV-2 was analysed regarding number of patients admitted in ICU. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty patients could benefit from neurosurgical care with a wide-ranging profile of clinical and surgical activities performed during the study that seemed similar to last year profile activity. Surgical indications were restricted to non-deferrable surgeries, leading to a drop in operative volume of 50%. Only 1.3% of patients required transfer to other units due to the impossibility of providing gold standard neurosurgical care in our centre. CONCLUSION: Despite the challenges represented by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, it was proven possible to ensure the routine neurosurgical continuity and provide high standards of neurosurgical care without compromising patients' access to the required treatments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Neurosurgery/standards , Neurosurgical Procedures , Patient Transfer , Registries , Retrospective Studies
5.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(1): 1-2, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030104
6.
7.
Childs Nerv Syst ; 37(4): 1313-1317, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-898010

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 pandemic has influenced all aspects of societies, with the healthcare being the most affected field. All specialties including neurosurgery are involved, and due to resource limitations, the number of elective surgeries in subspecialized filed has substantially decreased. Herein, we report our practice experience in pediatric neurosurgery in a tertiary hospital during pandemic, and the effects of pandemic on educational issues. METHODS: All the patients on whom any kind of neurosurgical operation was performed from March to June 2020 were retrospectively collected, and also from the same period in the previous year. RESULTS: A total of 111 patients underwent surgery in this period. This figure was 159 patients during the same period in 2019. The total number of surgical cases reduced by 31% compared to the last year. While ventriculoperitoneal shunts and supratentorial tumor were more frequent, there was a considerable reduction in subspecialized educational surgeries like neural tube defects and craniosynostoses. CONCLUSION: CVID-19 pandemic changed all scopes of medical practice and training. Considering the limitation in the available resources, the number of educational cases may decrease in subspecialized disciplines like pediatric neurosurgery. If pandemic continues, alternative measures should be taken to compensate for the shortcoming in technical and practical training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Developing Countries , Humans , Iran , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgical Procedures/education , Pediatrics/education , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(1): 82-86, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-873075

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is an international crisis placing tremendous strain on medical systems around the world. Like other specialties, neuroanesthesiology has been adversely affected and training programs have had to quickly adapt to the constantly changing environment. METHODS: An email-based survey was used to evaluate the effects of the pandemic on clinical workflow, clinical training, education, and trainee well-being. The impact of the International Council on Perioperative Neuroscience Training (ICPNT) accreditation was also assessed. RESULTS: Responses were received from 14 program directors (88% response rate) in 10 countries and from 36 fellows in these programs. Clinical training was adversely affected because of the cancellation of elective neurosurgery and other changes in case workflow, the introduction of modified airway and other protocols, and redeployment of trainees to other sites. To address educational demands, most programs utilized online platforms to organize clinical discussions, journal clubs, and provide safety training modules. Several initiatives were introduced to support trainee well-being during the pandemic. Feelings of isolation and despair among trainees varied from 2 to 8 (on a scale of 1 to 10). Fellows all reported concerns that their clinical training had been adversely affected by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic because of decreased exposure to elective subspecialty cases and limited opportunities to complete workplace-based assessments and training portfolio requirements. Cancellation of examination preparation courses and delayed examinations were cited as common sources of stress. Programs accredited by the ICPNT reported that international networking and collaboration was beneficial to reduce feelings of isolation during the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Neuroanesthesia fellowship training program directors introduced innovative ways to maintain clinical training, educational activity and trainee well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Accreditation/trends , Anesthesiology/education , Anesthesiology/trends , COVID-19 , Fellowships and Scholarships/trends , Neurology/education , Neurology/trends , Pandemics , Clinical Competence , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/trends
9.
Stroke Vasc Neurol ; 5(4): 323-330, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-852719

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and physical distancing guidelines have compelled stroke practices worldwide to reshape their delivery of care significantly. We aimed to illustrate how the stroke services were interrupted during the pandemic in China. METHODS: A 61-item questionnaire designed on Wenjuanxing Form was completed by doctors or nurses who were involved in treating patients with stroke from 1 February to 31 March 2020. RESULTS: A total of 415 respondents completed the online survey after informed consent was obtained. Of the respondents, 37.8%, 35.2% and 27.0% were from mild, moderate and severe epidemic areas, respectively. Overall, the proportion of severe impact (reduction >50%) on the admission of transient ischaemic stroke, acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) and intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) was 45.0%, 32.0% and 27.5%, respectively. Those numbers were 36.9%, 27.9% and 22.3%; 36.5%, 22.1% and 22.6%; and 66.4%, 47.5% and 41.1% in mild, moderate and severe epidemic areas, respectively (all p<0.0001). For AIS, thrombolysis was moderate (20%-50% reduction) or severely impacted (>50%), as reported by 54.4% of the respondents, while thrombectomy was 39.3%. These were 44.4%, 26.3%; 44.2%, 39.4%; and 78.2%, 56.5%, in mild, moderate and severe epidemic areas, respectively (all p<0.0001). For patients with acute ICH, 39.8% reported the impact was severe or moderate for those eligible for surgery who had surgery. Those numbers were 27.4%, 39.0% and 58.1% in mild, moderate and severe epidemic areas, respectively. For staff resources, about 20% (overall) to 55% (severe epidemic) of the respondents reported moderate or severe impact on the on-duty doctors and nurses. CONCLUSION: We found a significant reduction of admission for all types of patients with stroke during the pandemic. Patients were less likely to receive appropriate care, for example, thrombolysis/thrombectomy, after being admitted to the hospital. Stroke service in severe COVID-19 epidemic areas, for example, Wuhan, was much more severely impacted compared with other regions in China.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Cerebral Hemorrhage/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Ischemic Attack, Transient/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Patient Care Management , Stroke/surgery , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thrombolytic Therapy/statistics & numerical data
10.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 12(11): 1049-1052, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-809207

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Academic physicians aim to provide clinical and surgical care to their patients while actively contributing to a growing body of scientific literature. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has resulted in procedural-based specialties across the United States witnessing a sharp decline in their clinical volume and surgical cases. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of COVID-19 on neurosurgical, stroke neurology, and neurointerventional academic productivity. METHODS: The study compared the neurosurgical, stroke neurology, and neurointerventional academic output during the pandemic lockdown with the same time period in previous years. Editors from a sample of neurosurgical, stroke neurology, and neurointerventional journals provided the total number of original manuscript submissions, broken down by months, from the year 2016 to 2020. Manuscript submission was used as a surrogate metric for academic productivity. RESULTS: 8 journals were represented. The aggregated data from all eight journals as a whole showed that a combined average increase of 42.3% was observed on original submissions for 2020. As the average yearly percent increase using the 2016-2019 data for each journal exhibited a combined average increase of 11.2%, the rise in the yearly increase for 2020 in comparison was nearly fourfold. For the same journals in the same time period, the average percent of COVID-19 related publications from January to June of 2020 was 6.87%. CONCLUSION: There was a momentous increase in the number of original submissions for the year 2020, and its effects were uniformly experienced across all of our represented journals.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Efficiency , Neurology/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Research/statistics & numerical data , Stroke/physiopathology , Stroke/surgery , Universities/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Humans , Neurosurgery/trends , Periodicals as Topic , Publishing , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Research/trends , Universities/trends
12.
World Neurosurg ; 145: e53-e60, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-779766

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic poses major risks to health care workers in neurocritical care. Recommendations are in place to limit medical personnel attending to the neurosurgical patient as a protective measure and to conserve personal protective equipment. However, the complexity of the neurosurgical patient proves to be a challenge and an opportunity for innovation. The goal of our study was to determine if telemedicine delivered through smart glasses was feasible and effective in an alternative method of conducting ward round on neurocritical care patients during the pandemic. METHODS: A random pair of neurosurgery resident and specialist conducted consecutive virtual and physical ward rounds on neurocritical patients. A virtual ward round was first conducted remotely by a specialist who received real-time audiovisual information from a resident wearing smart glasses integrated with telemedicine. Subsequently, a physical ward round was performed together by the resident and specialist on the same patient. The management plans of both ward rounds were compared, and the intrarater reliability was measured. On study completion a qualitative survey was performed. RESULTS: Ten paired ward rounds were performed on 103 neurocritical care patients with excellent overall intrarater reliability. Nine out of 10 showed good to excellent internal consistency, and 1 showed acceptable internal consistency. Qualitative analysis indicated wide user acceptance and high satisfaction rate with the alternative method. CONCLUSIONS: Virtual ward rounds using telemedicine via smart glasses on neurosurgical patients in critical care were feasible, effective, and widely accepted as an alternative to physical ward rounds during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care/methods , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Pandemics , Smart Glasses , Telemedicine/methods , Delivery of Health Care , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Observer Variation , Reproducibility of Results
13.
World Neurosurg ; 143: e550-e560, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-765764

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The true incidence of perioperative coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has not been well elucidated in neurosurgical studies. We reviewed the effects of the pandemic on the neurosurgical case volume to study the incidence of COVID-19 in patients undergoing these procedures during the perioperative period and compared the characteristics and outcomes of this group to those of patients without COVID-19. METHODS: The neurosurgical and neurointerventional procedures at 2 tertiary care centers during the pandemic were reviewed. The case volume, type, and acuity were compared to those during the same period in 2019. The perioperative COVID-19 tests and results were evaluated to obtain the incidence. The baseline characteristics, including a modified Medically Necessary Time Sensitive (mMeNTS) score, and outcome measures were compared between those with and without COVID-19. RESULTS: A total of 405 cases were reviewed, and a significant decrease was found in total spine, cervical spine, lumbar spine, and functional/pain cases. No significant differences were found in the number of cranial or neurointerventional cases. Of the 334 patients tested, 18 (5.4%) had tested positive for COVID-19. Five of these patients were diagnosed postoperatively. The mMeNTS score, complications, and case acuity were significantly different between the patients with and without COVID-19. CONCLUSION: A small, but real, risk exists of perioperative COVID-19 in neurosurgical patients, and those patients have tended to have a greater complication rate. Use of the mMeNTS score might play a role in decision making for scheduling elective cases. Further studies are warranted to develop risk stratification and validate the incidence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , District of Columbia , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
15.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 12(10): 927-931, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-710047

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is currently known about the effects of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on neurointerventional (NI) procedural volumes or its toll on physician wellness. METHODS: A 37-question online survey was designed and distributed to physician members of three NI physician organizations. RESULTS: A total of 151 individual survey responses were obtained. Reduced mechanical thrombectomy procedures compared with pre-pandemic were observed with 32% reporting a greater than 50% reduction in thrombectomy volumes. In concert with most (76%) reporting at least a 25% reduction in non-mechanical thrombectomy urgent NI procedures and a nearly unanimous (96%) cessation of non-urgent elective cases, 68% of physicians reported dramatic reductions (>50%) in overall NI procedural volume compared with pre-pandemic. Increased door-to-puncture times were reported by 79%. COVID-19-positive infections occurred in 1% of physician respondents: an additional 8% quarantined for suspected infection. Sixty-six percent of respondents reported increased career stress, 56% increased personal life/family stress, and 35% increased career burnout. Stress was significantly increased in physicians with COVID-positive family members (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study designed to understand the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on NI physician practices, case volumes, compensation, personal/family stresses, and work-related burnout. Future studies examining these factors following the resumption of elective cases and relaxing of social distancing measures will be necessary to better understand these phenomena.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Physician's Role , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
17.
World Neurosurg ; 143: e344-e350, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-670848

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: New York City is the epicenter of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the United States. Traumatic brain injury accounts for a significant proportion of admissions to our trauma center. We sought to characterize the effect of the pandemic on neurotraumas, given the cancellation of nonessential activities during the crisis. METHODS: Retrospective and prospective reviews were performed from November 2019 to April 2020. General demographics, clinical status, mechanism of trauma, diagnosis, and treatment instituted were recorded. We dichotomized the data between pre-COVID-19 (before 1 March) and COVID-19 periods and compared the differences between the 2 groups. We present the timeline of events since the beginning of the crisis in relation to the number of neurotraumas. RESULTS: A total of 150 patients composed our cohort with a mean age of 66.2 years (standard deviation ±18.9), and 66% were male. More males sustained neurotrauma in the COVID-19 period compared with the pre-COVID-19 (60.4% vs. 77.6%, P = 0.03). The most common mechanism of trauma was mechanical fall, but it was observed less frequently compared with the pre-COVID-19 period (61.4% vs. 40.8; P = 0.03). Subdural hematoma, traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, and intracerebral contusion accounted for the most common pathologies in both periods. Nonoperative management was selected for most patients (79.2 vs. 87.8%, P = 0.201) in both periods. CONCLUSIONS: A decrease in the frequency of neurotraumas was observed during the COVID-19 crisis concomitant with the increase in COVID-19 patients in the city. This trend began after the cancellation of nonessential activities and implementation of social distancing recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Adult , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City , Psychological Distance , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
19.
World Neurosurg ; 141: e1017-e1026, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-645089

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus and subsequent pandemic have drastically transfigured health care delivery. Surgical specialties have seen severe alterations or reductions to practice, with neurosurgery being one example in which staff and resource reallocation has occurred to meet wider public health needs. This review summarizes the published evidence detailing early experiences and changes to neurosurgical practice in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted up until April 21, 2020 in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, by searching Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Central, and Web of Science Core Collection databases. Individual studies were qualitatively assessed to outline core themes detailing changes to practice. Iterative analysis allowed themes to be developed and applied to all studies included in the review. RESULTS: In total, 13 themes from 18 studies were identified, grouped into 3 overriding themes: logistics, human resources, and clinical delivery. Studies originated from 3 of the most affected countries (United States, China, and Italy), comprising expert opinions, letters to the editor, editorials, case reports, or perspective pieces. The commonest themes discussed include cancellation of elective operations, reduction in outpatient services, and pandemic rotas. CONCLUSIONS: This review summarizes the early responses of the neurosurgical community to the COVID-19 pandemic and presents a menu of interventions to be considered in future pandemic response, or in recurrent outbreaks of COVID-19. Whilst our review is limited by the low quality of evidence and rapid rate of change in our understanding of COVID-19, it provides a valuable summary of initial responses by the neurosurgical community to a global pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/surgery , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics
20.
Neurol India ; 68(3): 595-602, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639394

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented challenge for medical professionals throughout the world to tackle the rapidly changing scenario. The objective of this survey was to analyze the change in neurosurgical practice in India following the COVID-19 outbreak and assess its impact on practising neurosurgeons. Materials and Methods: Between May 7th and 23rd, 2020, a validated questionnaire was circulated amongst practising neurosurgeons across the country by social media and e-mails, regarding changes in the patterns of patients seen, adaptations made in their practice, effect on surgeries performed, financial burden, and impact on their personal lives. The responses were kept anonymous and were analyzed for correlations between the changes observed and independent factors such as hospital affiliations, teaching professions, and neurosurgical experience. Results: Our survey showed a drastic fall in the number of neurosurgical patients seen in the outpatient department (OPD) as well as the number of surgeries performed. A drop of 76.25% was seen in OPD patients (P = 0.000) and that of 70.59% in surgeries performed (P = 0.000). There was no uniformity among the neurosurgeons in the number of COVID-19 tests being done before elective/emergency surgery and in the use of protective gear while examining patients. Private practitioners were more affected financially as compared to those in the government sector. The pandemic has affected the research work of 53.23% of all respondents, with those in the teaching profession (70.96%) more affected than those in the non-teaching profession (24.67%). Conclusions: Evidence-based policies, screening COVID-19 tests with better sensitivity, and better-quality personal protective equipment kits in adequate numbers are required to protect our medical professionals from COVID-19. Mental health issues among neurosurgeons may also be an issue, this being a high risk speciality and should be closely watched for.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Mass Screening , Neurosurgeons/economics , Neurosurgeons/psychology , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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