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2.
World Neurosurg ; 150: e790-e793, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1517507

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global burden of neurosurgical disease is substantial, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Medical conferences are important in connecting those from LMICs to those from high-income countries for support and serve as an educational and networking tool. In this study, we sought to quantitatively assess the incorporation of global neurosurgery topics in international conferences related to the neurosurgical specialty. METHODS: A database of major international neurosurgical conferences, from the conference of a group of 9 major neurosurgical societies, that had global neurosurgery featured from 2015 to 2020 was created. We then did a retrospective analysis to study the characteristics of these conferences ranging from geographic location to number to different components of the conferences. RESULTS: There was an increase in the number of conferences with global neurosurgery since 2015. This, in addition to the occurrence of 3 wholly global neurosurgery-related conferences in recent years, is promising and suggests growth in the field. However, 52.6% of conferences took place in North American or European countries, the majority of which were high-income countries. Furthermore, a majority of the presence of global neurosurgery was in the form of individual talks (54.5%) as opposed to plenaries or sessions. CONCLUSIONS: The preponderance of conferences in North America and Europe can pose barriers for those from LMICs including travel time, expenses, and visa problems. As global neurosurgery becomes an increasing part of the global health movement, we hope that these barriers are addressed. Conferences may become an even stronger tool to promote equity in neurosurgical education and practice.


Subject(s)
Congresses as Topic/trends , Global Health/trends , Internationality , Neurosurgeons/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Cohort Studies , Humans , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Retrospective Studies
5.
No Shinkei Geka ; 49(5): 1093-1104, 2021 Sep.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456522

ABSTRACT

Although surgical site infections(SSIs)are usually controllable, their occasional occurrence is unavoidable. SSIs in neurosurgery comprise surgical-wound infections and surgical-organ/space infections. Data from the Japan Nosocomial Infections Surveillance revealed an overall infection rate of 1.1% during the first half of 2020. Responses to two questionnaire-based surveys on SSI prevention and complications related to cranial implant/artificial bone revealed the real world situation in neurosurgery. In 2020, neurosurgical information was added to the practical guidelines concerning the proper use of prophylactic antibacterial drug for SSIs. COVID-19 hygiene control protocols may have reduced the incidence of SSIs. It may be prudent to continue this stringent hygiene control after the COVID-19 pandemic has abated. Information of medical material on SSI is presented in this article, including the Plus suture®, DuraGen®, DuraSeal®, Adherus®, ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene(SKULPIO®, CRANIOFIT-PE®), Bioglide® and Bactiseal® shunt systems, and olanexidine. Minimizing SSIs requires proper knowledge on infection control, taking care while performing neurosurgical procedures, and compassion for the patients. In addition, information and material must be updated over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurosurgery , Humans , Neurosurgical Procedures/adverse effects , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Wound Infection/epidemiology , Surgical Wound Infection/prevention & control
7.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(10): 2846-2850, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441256

ABSTRACT

In order to maintain manual dexterity and surgical skills, trainees are encouraged to partake in regular simulation. Current options for intraocular surgical simulation require specialist microscopic equipment which is expensive and requires access to simulation facilities. A set of core simulation exercises and basic surgical skills of performing the corneal incisions, capsulorhexis, improving the manual dexterity, and suturing were identified, discussed, and agreed among authors before designing this simulation exercise. In this paper, we propose a smartphone-based, low-cost, low-tech model with corresponding exercises for intraocular simulation that can be used at home for the above-mentioned surgical skill set. This model provides an easy, portable, and reproducible method of simulation and can serve as an adjunct to patient-facing surgical training, especially in the current pandemic, where the excess to the simulation facilities or setup of these facilities may be difficult.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Microsurgery , Capsulorhexis , Humans , Neurosurgical Procedures , Sutures
8.
World Neurosurg ; 154: e370-e381, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440404

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has considerably affected surgical practice. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the pandemic on neurosurgical practice and the safety of the resumption of elective procedures through implementing screening protocols in a high-volume academic public center in Iran, as one of the countries severely affected by the pandemic. METHODS: This unmatched case-control study compared 2 populations of patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures between June 1, 2019 and September 1, 2019 and the same period in 2020. In the prospective part of the study, patients who underwent elective procedures were tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection postoperatively to evaluate the viability of our screening protocol. RESULTS: Elective and emergency procedures showed significant reduction during the pandemic (59.4%, n = 168 vs. 71.3%, n = 380) and increase (28.7%, n = 153 vs. 40.6%, n = 115, respectively; P = 0.003). The proportional distribution of neurosurgical categories remained unchanged during the pandemic. Poisson regression showed that the reduction in total daily admissions and some categories, including spine, trauma, oncology, and infection were significantly correlated with the pandemic. Among patients who underwent elective procedures, 0 (0.0%) and 26 (16.25%) had positive test results on days 30 and 60 postoperatively, respectively. Overall mortality was comparable between the pre-COVID-19 and COVID-19 periods, yet patients with concurrent SARS-CoV-2 infection showed substantially higher mortality (65%). CONCLUSIONS: By implementing safety and screening protocols with proper resource allocation, the emergency care capacity can be maintained and the risk minimized of hospital-acquired SARS-CoV-2 infection, complications, and mortality among neurosurgical patients during the pandemic. Similarly, for elective procedures, according to available resources, hospital beds can be allocated for patients with a higher risk of delayed hospitalization and those who are concerned about the risk of hospital-acquired infection can be reassured.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19 Testing , Case-Control Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures/mortality , Feasibility Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Neurosurgical Procedures , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
9.
World Neurosurg ; 155: e576-e587, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386731

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2) crisis led to many restrictions in daily life and protective health care actions in all hospitals to ensure basic medical supply. This questionnaire-based study among spinal surgeons in central Europe was generated to investigate the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and consecutively the differences in restrictions in spinal surgery units. METHODS: An online survey consisting of 32 questions on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the related restrictions on spinal surgery units was created. Surgical fellows and consultants from neurosurgical, orthopedic, and trauma departments were included in our questionnaire-based study with the help of Austrian, German, and Swiss scientific societies. RESULTS: In a total of 406 completed questionnaires, most participants reported increased preventive measurements at daily clinical work (split-team work schedule [44%], cancellation of elective and/or semielective surgeries [91%]), reduced occurrence of emergencies (91%), decreased outpatient work (45%) with increased telemedical care (73%) and a reduced availability of medical equipment (75%) as well as medical staff (30%). Although most physicians considered the political restrictive decisions to be not suitable, most considered the medical measures to be appropriate. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in comparable restrictive measures for spinal surgical departments in central Europe. Elective surgical interventions were reduced, providing additional resources reserved for severe acute respiratory coronavirus 2-positive patients. Although similar restrictions were introduced in most participants' departments, the supply of personal protective equipment and the outpatient care remained insufficient and should be re-evaluated intensively for future global health care crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neurosurgeons/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Spinal Diseases/epidemiology , Spinal Diseases/surgery , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Ambulatory Care/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/trends
10.
World Neurosurg ; 155: e142-e149, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356487

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease identified in 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed neurosurgery protocols to provide ongoing care for patients while ensuring the safety of health care workers. In Brazil, the rapid spread of the disease led to new challenges in the health system. Neurooncology practice was one of the most affected by the pandemic due to restricted elective procedures and new triage protocols. We aim to characterize the impact of the pandemic on neurosurgery in Brazil. METHODS: We analyzed 112 different types of neurosurgical procedures, with special detail in 11 neurooncology procedures, listed in the Brazilian Hospital Information System records in the DATASUS database between February and July 2019 and the same period in 2020. Linear regression and paired t-test analyses were performed and considered statistically significant at P < 0.05. RESULTS: There was an overall decrease of 21.5% (28,858 cases) in all neurosurgical procedures, impacting patients needing elective procedures (-42.46%) more than emergency surgery (-5.93%). Neurooncology procedures decreased by 14.89%. Nonetheless, the mortality rate during hospitalization increased by 21.26%. Linear regression analysis in hospitalizations (Slope = 0.9912 ± 0.07431; CI [95%] = 0.8231-1.159) and total cost (Slope = 1.03 ± 0.03501; CI [95%] = 0.9511-1.109) in the 11 different types of neurooncology procedures showed a P < 0.0001. The mean cost per type of procedure showed an 11.59% increase (P = 0.0172) between 2019 and 2020. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has increased mortality, decreased hospitalizations, and therefore decreased overall costs, despite increased costs per procedure for a variety of neurosurgical procedures. Our study serves as a stark example of the effect of the pandemic on neurosurgical care in settings of limited resources and access to care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Developing Countries , Hospital Information Systems/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/economics , Developing Countries/economics , Health Personnel/economics , Health Personnel/trends , Hospital Information Systems/economics , Humans , Neurosurgical Procedures/economics , Personal Protective Equipment/economics , Personal Protective Equipment/trends
14.
15.
World Neurosurg ; 154: e118-e129, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337002

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Neurosurgical patients are at a higher risk of having a severe course of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The objective of this study was to determine morbidity, hospital course, and mortality of neurosurgical patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in a multicenter health care system. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was conducted to identify all hospitalized neurosurgical patients positive for COVID-19 from March 11, 2020 to November 2, 2020 at Mayo Clinic and the Mayo Clinic Health System. RESULTS: Eleven hospitalized neurosurgical patients (0.68%) were positive for COVID-19. Four patients (36.6%) were men and 7 (63.3%) were women. The mean age was 65.7 years (range, 35-81 years). All patients had comorbidities. The mean length of stay was 13.4 days (range, 4-30 days). Seven patients had a central nervous system malignancy (4 metastases, 1 meningioma, 1 glioblastoma, and 1 schwannoma). Three patients presented with cerebrovascular complications, comprising 2 spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhages and 1 ischemic large-vessel stroke. One patient presented with an unstable traumatic spinal burst fracture. Four patients underwent neurosurgical/neuroendovascular interventions. Discharge disposition was to home in 5 patients, rehabilitation facility in 3, and hospice in 3. Five patients had died at follow-up, 3 within 30 days from COVID-19 complications and 2 from progression of their metastatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 is rare among the inpatient neurosurgical population. In all cases, patients had multiple comorbidities. All symptomatic patients from the respiratory standpoint had complications during their hospitalization. Deaths of 3 patients who died within 30 days of hospitalization were all related to COVID-19 complications. Neurosurgical procedures were performed only if deemed emergent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Central Nervous System Neoplasms/surgery , Cerebrovascular Disorders/complications , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Neurosurgical Procedures/mortality , Pandemics , Patient Readmission/statistics & numerical data , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Spinal Fractures/surgery , Treatment Outcome
17.
World Neurosurg ; 154: e547-e554, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331292

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: After the official announcement of the coronavirus disease-19 pandemic on March 11, 2020, the disease impacted most aspects of health care delivery, especially postgraduate education and training. METHOD: A cross-sectional, online questionnaire-based assessment was performed. The study participants involved neurosurgery residents and program directors (PDs) across the country between May 16 and May 27, 2020. RESULTS: Approximately 74 of 95 (77.9%) of the residents experienced an impact on their training calendar. Before the pandemic, 51 residents (53.3%) were involved in 2-3 surgeries per week, but during the pandemic, 66 (69.5%) were attending 0-1 case per week. Fifty-three residents (55.8%) agreed that academic sessions were affected despite the helpful effort of online teaching sessions. Thirty-four (35.8%) residents graded their anxiety during coronavirus disease-19 times as high. Ten PDs (58.8%) confirmed spending 3-5 hours per week on educational activities normally, whereas during the pandemic, 15 PDs (88.2%) reduced their educational hours to 0-2 hours per week. CONCLUSION: Our study showed that educational activities significantly decreased and shifted toward virtual teaching methods. Operative volume showed a substantial reduction for both junior and senior residents. Academic and clinical teaching was the main concern for PDs, and they faced challenges interviewing newly matched residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/education , Pandemics , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Saudi Arabia , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
18.
World Neurosurg ; 155: e34-e40, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331291

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the COVID-19 pandemic surpasses 1 year, it is prudent to reflect on the challenges faced and the management strategies employed to tackle this overwhelming health care crisis. We undertook this study to validate our institutional protocols, which were formulated to cater to the change in volume and pattern of neurosurgical cases during the raging pandemic. METHODS: All admitted patients scheduled to undergo major neurosurgical intervention during the lockdown period (15 March 2020 to 15 September 2020) were included in the study. The data involving surgery outcomes, disease pattern, anesthesia techniques, patient demographics, as well as COVID-19 status, were analyzed and compared with similar retrospective data of neurosurgical patients operated during the same time period in the previous year (15 March 2019 to 15 September 2019). RESULTS: Barring significant increase in surgery for stroke (P = 0.008) and hydrocephalus (P <0.001), the overall case load of neurosurgery during the study period in 2020 was 42.75% of that in 2019 (P < 0.001), attributable to a significant reduction in elective spine surgeries (P < 0.001). However, no significant difference was observed in the overall incidence of emergency and essential surgeries undertaken during the 2 time periods (P = 0.482). There was an increased incidence in the use of monitored anesthesia care techniques during emergency and essential neurosurgical procedures by the anesthesia team in 2020 (P < 0.001). COVID-19 patients had overall poor outcomes (P = 0.003), with significant increase in mortality among those subjected to general anesthesia vis-a-vis monitored anesthesia care (P = 0.014). CONCLUSIONS: Despite a significant decrease in neurosurgical workload during the COVID-19 lockdown period in 2020, the volume of emergency and essential surgeries did not change much compared with the previous year. Surgery in COVID-19 patients is best avoided, unless critical, as the outcome in these patients is not favorable. The employment of monitored anesthesia care techniques like awake craniotomy and regional anesthesia facilitate a better outcome in the ongoing COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/trends , Health Resources/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/trends , Clinical Protocols , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
20.
World Neurosurg ; 154: e320-e324, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309404

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increasing restrictions over trainees' working hours and the recent coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic warrant new educational methods of surgical skills. We assessed a novel video-recording system for neuroendovascular skill education, developed with the installation of a hybrid operating room (OR) at our institution. METHODS: A single-plane angiography unit with a large flat display (FlexVision XL; Philips Medical Systems) was installed in our OR. All media sources in the OR, including live fluoroscopy and ceiling-mounted camcorders, were connected to a video switcher. This video switcher laid up to 8 video images into one big image, which was transferred to the large display and the professional-use Blu-ray recorder. The recording was performed continuously during the procedure. This recording system was evaluated retrospectively with a questionnaire administered to the 5 trainees. RESULTS: Using this system, 68 interventional procedures were recorded. Among the potential merits, the trainees assigned the greatest value to the simultaneous recording of the operator's hand motions and the fluoroscopy images. Among the potential limitations of the system, the prolonged time and the increased volume of the video data bothered the trainees the most. The recorded video looked like a live demonstration. CONCLUSIONS: Our "selfie" video recording system was useful for skill training of neuroendovascular interventions.


Subject(s)
Endovascular Procedures/education , Neurosurgery/education , Neurosurgical Procedures/education , Operating Rooms , Video Recording , Angiography , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Education, Medical, Graduate , Fluoroscopy , Humans , Internship and Residency , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
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