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1.
PLoS One ; 17(1): e0262352, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606851

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 infection has been hypothesized to precipitate venous and arterial clotting events more frequently than other illnesses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We demonstrate this increased risk of blood clots by comparing rates of venous and arterial clotting events in 4400 hospitalized COVID-19 patients in a large multisite clinical network in the United States examined from April through June of 2020, to patients hospitalized for non-COVID illness and influenza during the same time period and in 2019. RESULTS: We demonstrate that COVID-19 increases the risk of venous thrombosis by two-fold compared to the general inpatient population and compared to people with influenza infection. Arterial and venous thrombosis were both common occurrences among patients with COVID-19 infection. Risk factors for thrombosis included male gender, older age, and diabetes. Patients with venous or arterial thrombosis had high rates of admission to the ICU, re-admission to the hospital, and death. CONCLUSION: Given the ongoing scientific discussion about the impact of clotting on COVID-19 disease progression, these results highlight the need to further elucidate the role of anticoagulation in COVID-19 patients, particularly outside the intensive care unit setting. Additionally, concerns regarding clotting and COVID-19 vaccines highlight the importance of addressing the alarmingly high rate of clotting events during actual COVID-19 infection when weighing the risks and benefits of vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Thrombosis/pathology , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , New Jersey , Retrospective Studies , Thrombosis/mortality , United States
2.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 149(1): 130e-138e, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583939

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the first documented case of coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), the greater New York City area quickly became the epicenter of the global pandemic, with over 500,000 cases and 50,000 deaths. This unprecedented crisis affected all aspects of health care, including plastic surgery residency training. The purpose of this study was to understand the specific impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on plastic surgery residencies. METHODS: A survey of all plastic surgery residency training programs in the greater New York City area was conducted. The impact to training during the peak months of infection (March and April of 2020) was evaluated using resident education as measured by case numbers, need for redeployment, and staff wellness as primary outcome variables. RESULTS: A total of 11 programs were identified in the region, and seven programs completed the survey, with a response rate 63.6 percent. When comparing productivity in March and April of 2019 to March and April of 2020, a total decrease in surgical volume of 64.8 percent (range, 19.7 to 84.8 percent) and an average of 940 (range, 50 to 1287) cancelled clinic visits per month were observed. These decreases directly correlated with the local county's COVID-19 incidence rates (p = 0.70). A total of 83 percent of programs required redeployment to areas of need, and correlation between local incidence of COVID-19 and the percentage of residents redeployed to non-plastic surgical clinical environments by a given program (ρ = 0.97) was observed. CONCLUSION: As the first COVID-19 wave passes the greater New York area and spreads to the rest of the country, the authors hope their experience will shed light on the effects of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and inform other programs on what to expect and how they can try and prepare for future public health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/standards , Pandemics , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Surgery, Plastic/education , Humans , New Jersey/epidemiology , New York City/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Microbiol Spectr ; 9(3): e0188221, 2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522930

ABSTRACT

Emergence of SARS-CoV-2 with high transmission and immune evasion potential, the so-called variants of concern (VOC), is a major concern. We describe the early genomic epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 recovered from vaccinated health care professionals (HCP). Our postvaccination COVID-19 symptoms-based surveillance program among HCPs in a 17-hospital network identified all vaccinated HCPs who tested positive for COVID-19 after routine screening or after self-reporting. From 1 January 2021 to 30 April 2021, 23,687 HCPs received either mRNA-1273 or BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. All available postvaccination SARS-CoV-2 samples and a random collection from nonvaccinated patients during the similar time frame were subjected to VOC screening and whole-genome sequencing (WGS). Sixty-two percent (23,697/37,500) of HCPs received at least one vaccine dose, with 60% (22,458) fully vaccinated. We detected 138 (0.58%, 138/23,697) COVID-19 cases, 105 among partially vaccinated and 33 (0.15%, 33/22,458) among fully vaccinated. Five partially vaccinated required hospitalization, four with supplemental oxygen. VOC screening from 16 fully vaccinated HCPs identified 6 (38%) harboring N501Y and 1 (6%) with E484K polymorphisms; percentage of concurrent nonvaccinated samples was 37% (523/1,404) and 20% (284/1,394), respectively. There was an upward trend from January to April for E484K/Q (3% to 26%) and N501Y (1% to 49%). WGS analysis from vaccinated and nonvaccinated individuals indicated highly congruent phylogenies. We did not detect an increased frequency of any receptor-binding domain (RBD)/N-terminal domain (NTD) polymorphism between groups (P > 0.05). Our results support robust protection by vaccination, particularly among recipients of both doses. Despite VOCs accounting for over 40% of SARS-CoV-2 from fully vaccinated individuals, the genomic diversity appears to proportionally represent VOCs among nonvaccinated populations. IMPORTANCE A number of highly effective vaccines have been developed and deployed to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. The emergence and epidemiological dominance of SARS-CoV-2 mutants with high transmission potential and immune evasion properties, the so-called variants of concern (VOC), continue to be a major concern. Whether these VOCs alter the efficacy of the administered vaccines is of great concern and a critical question to study. We describe the initial genomic epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 recovered from partial/fully vaccinated health care professionals and probe specifically for VOC enrichment. Our findings support the high level of protection provided by full vaccination despite a steep increase in the prevalence of polymorphisms associated with increased transmission potential (N501Y) and immune evasion (E484K) in the nonvaccinated population. Thus, we do not find evidence of VOC enrichment among vaccinated groups. Overall, the genomic diversity of SARS-CoV-2 recovered postvaccination appears to proportionally represent the observed viral diversity within the community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epidemiologic Studies , Genomics , Health Personnel , Molecular Epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccination , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Female , Genotype , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation , New Jersey , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Whole Genome Sequencing , Young Adult
4.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(12): 1115-1123, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522398

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to present: (1) physiatric care delivery amid the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, (2) challenges, (3) data from the first cohort of post-COVID-19 inpatient rehabilitation facility patients, and (4) lessons learned by a research consortium of New York and New Jersey rehabilitation institutions. DESIGN: For this clinical descriptive retrospective study, data were extracted from post-COVID-19 patient records treated at a research consortium of New York and New Jersey rehabilitation inpatient rehabilitation facilities (May 1-June 30, 2020) to characterize admission criteria, physical space, precautions, bed numbers, staffing, employee wellness, leadership, and family communication. For comparison, data from the Uniform Data System and eRehabData databases were analyzed. The research consortium of New York and New Jersey rehabilitation members discussed experiences and lessons learned. RESULTS: The COVID-19 patients (N = 320) were treated during the study period. Most patients were male, average age of 61.9 yrs, and 40.9% were White. The average acute care length of stay before inpatient rehabilitation facility admission was 24.5 days; mean length of stay at inpatient rehabilitation facilities was 15.2 days. The rehabilitation research consortium of New York and New Jersey rehabilitation institutions reported a greater proportion of COVID-19 patients discharged to home compared with prepandemic data. Some institutions reported higher changes in functional scores during rehabilitation admission, compared with prepandemic data. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic acutely affected patient care and overall institutional operations. The research consortium of New York and New Jersey rehabilitation institutions responded dynamically to bed expansions/contractions, staff deployment, and innovations that facilitated safe and effective patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/rehabilitation , Facilities and Services Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Needs and Demand/statistics & numerical data , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Subacute Care/statistics & numerical data , Acute Disease , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Databases, Factual , Female , Functional Status , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , New Jersey , New York , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Subacute Care/methods , Treatment Outcome
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(22)2021 11 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512365

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 created an unprecedented global public health crisis during 2020-2021. The severity of the fast-spreading infection, combined with uncertainties regarding the physical and biological processes affecting transmission of SARS-CoV-2, posed enormous challenges to healthcare systems. Pandemic dynamics exhibited complex spatial heterogeneities across multiple scales, as local demographic, socioeconomic, behavioral and environmental factors were modulating population exposures and susceptibilities. Before effective pharmacological interventions became available, controlling exposures to SARS-CoV-2 was the only public health option for mitigating the disease; therefore, models quantifying the impacts of heterogeneities and alternative exposure interventions on COVID-19 outcomes became essential tools informing policy development. This study used a stochastic SEIR framework, modeling each of the 21 New Jersey counties, to capture important heterogeneities of COVID-19 outcomes across the State. The models were calibrated using confirmed daily deaths and SQMC optimization and subsequently applied in predictive and exploratory modes. The predictions achieved good agreement between modeled and reported death data; counterfactual analysis was performed to assess the effectiveness of layered interventions on reducing exposures to SARS-CoV-2 and thereby fatality of COVID-19. The modeling analysis of the reduction in exposures to SARS-CoV-2 achieved through concurrent social distancing and face-mask wearing estimated that 357 [IQR (290, 429)] deaths per 100,000 people were averted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Masks , New Jersey , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 568-572, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503696

ABSTRACT

The Institute of Medicine recommends residency programs be implemented for new graduates across all settings, yet hospitals have not consistently hardwired this into their organizations. The value proposition is in recruitment, retention, and the conservation of resources. New Jersey's experiences using the US Department of Labor apprenticeship model for nurse residency programs provides a strategy that can be implemented on a statewide basis.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing , Internship, Nonmedical/standards , Personnel Loyalty , COVID-19 , Evidence-Based Practice , Humans , Internship, Nonmedical/economics , New Jersey
7.
Nursing ; 51(7): 44-47, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393335

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Prone positioning is a recommended therapy for patients with COVID-19 who develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. This article describes the creation, operation, and evolution of the pronation therapy team at the author's Veterans Affairs facility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitals, Veterans/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Positioning/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , New Jersey/epidemiology , Prone Position , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology
8.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(7): e2117074, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310420

ABSTRACT

Importance: Black and Latinx communities have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, yet little work has sought to understand their perspectives. Objective: To explore the experiences of Black and Latinx communities during the pandemic to better understand their perspectives on COVID-19 mitigation behaviors (eg, mask wearing), testing, and vaccines. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this community-engaged qualitative study conducted with 18 community-based organizations and 4 health care organizations between November 19, 2020, and February 5, 2021, in New Jersey counties severely affected by the pandemic, group and individual interviews were used to purposively sample 111 Black and Latinx individuals. A total of 13 group interviews were organized by race/ethnicity and language: 4 English-speaking groups with Black participants (n = 34), 3 Spanish-speaking groups with Latinx participants (n = 24), and 4 English-speaking groups with Black and Latinx participants (n = 36). To understand the views of health care workers from these communities, 2 additional groups (n = 9) were convened and supplemented with individual interviews. Main Outcomes and Measures: Description of Black and Latinx participants' experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic and their perspectives on mitigation behaviors, testing, and vaccines. Results: The study included 111 participants (87 women [78.4%]; median age, 43 years [range, 18-93 years]). Participants described the devastating effects of the pandemic on themselves, loved ones, and their community. Their experiences were marked by fear, illness, loss, and separation. These experiences motivated intense information seeking, mitigation behaviors, and testing. Nevertheless, vaccine skepticism was high across all groups. Participants did not trust the vaccine development process and wanted clearer information. Black participants expressed that they did not want to be subjects of experiments. Conclusions and Relevance: The remaining unknowns about new vaccines need to be acknowledged and described for Black and Latinx communities to make informed decisions. Ultimately, scientists and public officials need to work transparently to address unanswered questions and work collaboratively with trusted community leaders and health professionals to foster partnered approaches, rather than focusing on marketing campaigns, to eliminate vaccine skepticism.


Subject(s)
African Americans , Attitude/ethnology , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Pandemics , Trust , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Information Seeking Behavior , Male , Mass Screening , Middle Aged , New Jersey , Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
9.
N Engl J Med ; 384(5): 400-401, 2021 Feb 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298876
10.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1239, 2021 06 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286816

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) sickened over 20 million residents in the United States (US) by January 2021. Our objective was to describe state variation in the effect of initial social distancing policies and non-essential business (NEB) closure on infection rates early in 2020. METHODS: We used an interrupted time series study design to estimate the total effect of all state social distancing orders, including NEB closure, shelter-in-place, and stay-at-home orders, on cumulative COVID-19 cases for each state. Data included the daily number of COVID-19 cases and deaths for all 50 states and Washington, DC from the New York Times database (January 21 to May 7, 2020). We predicted cumulative daily cases and deaths using a generalized linear model with a negative binomial distribution and a log link for two models. RESULTS: Social distancing was associated with a 15.4% daily reduction (Relative Risk = 0.846; Confidence Interval [CI] = 0.832, 0.859) in COVID-19 cases. After 3 weeks, social distancing prevented nearly 33 million cases nationwide, with about half (16.5 million) of those prevented cases among residents of the Mid-Atlantic census division (New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania). Eleven states prevented more than 10,000 cases per 100,000 residents within 3 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: The effect of social distancing on the infection rate of COVID-19 in the US varied substantially across states, and effects were largest in states with highest community spread.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physical Distancing , Humans , New Jersey , New York/epidemiology , Pennsylvania , Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
11.
Nursing ; 51(7): 44-47, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280142

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Prone positioning is a recommended therapy for patients with COVID-19 who develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. This article describes the creation, operation, and evolution of the pronation therapy team at the author's Veterans Affairs facility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitals, Veterans/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Patient Positioning/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , New Jersey/epidemiology , Prone Position , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology
12.
Front Public Health ; 9: 674035, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268318

ABSTRACT

Research Objective: Initiatives to address social determinants of health (SDOH) and measure health-related social needs (HRSN) within clinic settings are increasing. However, few have focused on the specific needs of Asian Americans (AA). We examine the prevalence of HRSN during a period spanning the COVID-19 pandemic to inform strategies to improve cancer screening and primary care among AA patients. Methods: We implemented a self-administered HRSN screening tool in English and Chinese, traditional (T) or simplified (S) text, within a hospital-affiliated, outpatient primary care practice predominantly serving AA in New Jersey. HRSN items included food insecurity, transportation barriers, utility needs, interpersonal violence, housing instability, immigration history, and neighborhood perceptions on cohesion and trust. We conducted medical chart reviews for a subset of participants to explore the relationship between HRSN and history of cancer screening. Results: Among 236 participants, most were Asian (74%), non-US born (79%), and privately insured (57%). One-third responded in Chinese (37%). Half reported having ≥1 HRSN. Interpersonal violence was high across all participants. Transportation needs were highest among Chinese-T participants, while food insecurity and housing instability were higher among Chinese-S participants. Lower-income patients had higher odds of having ≥2 HRSN (OR:2.53, 95% CI: 1.12, 5.98). Older age and public insurance/uninsured were significantly associated with low neighborhood perceptions. Conclusions: We observed higher than anticipated reports of HRSN among primary care patients in a suburban, hospital-affiliated practice serving AA. Low neighborhood perceptions, particularly among Chinese-S participants, highlight the importance of addressing broader SDOH among insured, suburban AA patients. These study findings inform the need to augment HRSN identification to adequately address social needs that impact health outcomes and life course experiences for Asian patients. As HRSN measuring efforts continue, and COVID-19's impact on the health of minority communities emerge, it will be critical to develop community-specific referral pathways to connect AA to resources for HRSN and continue to address more upstream social determinants of health for those who are disproportionately impacted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Aged , Asian Americans , Early Detection of Cancer , Humans , Neoplasms/diagnosis , New Jersey , Pandemics , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Child Abuse Negl ; 118: 105136, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252567

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has had a major impact on child abuse and neglect (CAN) in the U.S. leading to a change in the number of reported screened-in CAN investigations, missed prevention cases, and missed CAN cases. OBJECTIVES: To estimate the deficit number of CAN investigations and resultant estimated number of missed prevention and CAN cases due to the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S. from March 2020 to December 2020. METHODS: Secondary data analyses of administrative child welfare data from January 2013 to December 2020 from New York City, Florida, New Jersey and Wisconsin were conducted. Spline regression modeling controlling for autocorrelation was utilized to explore any significant changes once the pandemic began in March 2020 in the number of screened-in CAN investigations. The seven-year monthly average of screen-in CAN investigations for March through December from 2013 to 2019 was calculated and compared to the numbers of CAN investigations for March 2020 to December 2020. The resultant number of missed prevention cases and CAN cases was estimated for the four jurisdictions and used to approximate the number of missed prevention cases and CAN cases in the U.S., as well as the projected estimation of national lifetime economic costs. RESULTS: Prior to the pandemic, there were insignificant monthly increases of 0.7 CAN investigations in NYC and 6.2 CAN investigations in Florida, a significant monthly increase 4.2 CAN investigations in New Jersey and an insignificant monthly decrease in 0.6 CAN investigations in Wisconsin. Once the pandemic began, there were significant monthly decreases (p < .001) in each of the four jurisdictions, including 1425.6 fewer CAN investigations in NYC, 3548.0 fewer CAN investigations in Florida, 963.0 fewer CAN investigations in New Jersey and 529.1 fewer CAN investigations in Wisconsin. There were an estimated 60,791 fewer CAN investigations in these four jurisdictions from March 2020 to December 2020 of which there were approximately 18,540 missed prevention and CAN cases suggesting up to $4.2 billion in lifetime economic costs. It was estimated that were 623,137 children not investigated for CAN in the U.S. during the same 10-month period. This suggests that there were an estimated 85,993 children were missed for prevention services and about 104,040 children were missed for CAN with a potential lifetime economic impact of up to $48.1 billion in the U.S. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a precipitous drop in CAN investigations where almost 200,000 children are estimated to have been missed for prevention services and CAN in a 10-month period. There are opportunities for the child welfare jurisdictions to work with partner education, public health, social service and other providers to strategically approach this very grave issue in order to mitigate its impact on this very vulnerable population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Child Abuse/psychology , Child Abuse/trends , Child Welfare/psychology , Child Welfare/trends , Child , Family/psychology , Florida/epidemiology , Humans , Male , New Jersey/epidemiology , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Wisconsin/epidemiology
14.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10875, 2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243310

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 virus is responsible for the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which has spread to populations throughout the continental United States. Most state and local governments have adopted some level of "social distancing" policy, but infections have continued to spread despite these efforts. Absent a vaccine, authorities have few other tools by which to mitigate further spread of the virus. This begs the question of how effective social policy really is at reducing new infections that, left alone, could potentially overwhelm the existing hospitalization capacity of many states. We developed a mathematical model that captures correlations between some state-level "social distancing" policies and infection kinetics for all U.S. states, and use it to illustrate the link between social policy decisions, disease dynamics, and an effective reproduction number that changes over time, for case studies of Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Washington states. In general, our findings indicate that the potential for second waves of infection, which result after reopening states without an increase to immunity, can be mitigated by a return of social distancing policies as soon as possible after the waves are detected.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Policy , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Databases, Factual , Humans , Massachusetts/epidemiology , New Jersey/epidemiology , Physical Distancing , Public Policy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Washington/epidemiology
15.
Orthopedics ; 44(3): 180-186, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239042

ABSTRACT

In an attempt to preserve essential equipment and health care system capacity and slow the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, Governor Murphy suspended all elective surgeries performed in New Jersey from March 27, 2020, through May 25, 2020. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of postoperative COVID-19 infection following nonelective hip and knee surgery during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in New Jersey during this time. A retrospective cohort of 149 patients who underwent nonelective hip and knee surgery from March 27, 2020, through May 25, 2020, at 2 institutions was identified. The cohort was divided into hip fracture and non-fracture patients to compare the postoperative experience of these patient populations. The primary outcome was the incidence of postoperative COVID-19 infection diagnosed via severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 nasopharyngeal real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, discharge disposition, postoperative complications, and mortality rate. A total of 149 patients underwent nonelective hip and knee surgeries, including 76 hip fracture cases and 73 nonelective hip and knee arthroplasty cases. A postoperative diagnosis of COVID-19 was made for 5 (6.6%) of 76 hip fracture patients, and 2 of the 5 died secondary to COVID-19. There were no infections in the arthroplasty cohort. This study describes a low incidence of COVID-19 infection after nonelective hip and knee surgery during the surge of the COVID-19 pandemic in New Jersey. Patients who underwent hip fracture surgery had an increased incidence of postoperative COVID-19 infection. [Orthopedics. 2021;44(3):180-186.].


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19/etiology , Fracture Fixation , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Hip Fractures/surgery , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , New Jersey/epidemiology , Pandemics , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
16.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251799, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234589

ABSTRACT

Public parks serve an important societal function as recreational spaces for diverse communities of people, with well documented physical and mental health benefits. As such, parks may be crucial for how people have handled effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly the increasingly limited recreational opportunities, widespread financial uncertainty, and consequent heightened anxiety. Despite the documented benefits of parks, however, many states have instituted park shutdown orders due to fears that public parks could facilitate SARS-CoV-2 transmission. Here we use geotagged social media data from state, county, and local parks throughout New Jersey to examine whether park visitation increased when the COVID-19 pandemic began and whether park shutdown orders were effective at deterring park usage. We compare park usage during four discrete stages of spring 2020: (1) before the pandemic began, (2) during the beginning of the pandemic, (3) during the New Jersey governor's state-wide park shutdown order, and (4) following the lifting of the shutdown. We find that park visitation increased by 63.4% with the onset of the pandemic. The subsequent park shutdown order caused visitation in closed parks to decline by 76.1% while parks that remained open continued to experience elevated visitation levels. Visitation then returned to elevated pre-shutdown levels when closed parks were allowed to reopen. Altogether, our results indicate that parks continue to provide crucial services to society, particularly in stressful times when opportunities for recreation are limited. Furthermore, our results suggest that policies targeting human behavior can be effective and are largely reversible. As such, we should continue to invest in public parks and to explore the role of parks in managing public health and psychological well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Parks, Recreational/statistics & numerical data , Public Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Exercise , Humans , New Jersey/epidemiology , Pandemics , Physical Distancing , Quarantine/psychology , Recreation/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Media
17.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 994-997, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225582

ABSTRACT

Spike protein mutations E484K and N501Y carried by SARS-CoV-2 variants have been associated with concerning changes of the virus, including resistance to neutralizing antibodies and increased transmissibility. While the concerning variants are fast spreading in various geographical areas, identification and monitoring of these variants are lagging far behind, due in large part to the slow speed and insufficient capacity of viral sequencing. In response to the unmet need for a fast and efficient screening tool, we developed a single-tube duplex molecular assay for rapid and simultaneous identification of E484K and N501Y mutations from nasopharyngeal swab (NS) samples within 2.5 h from sample preparation to report. Using this tool, we screened a total of 1135 clinical NS samples collected from COVID patients at 8 hospitals within the Hackensack Meridian Health network in New Jersey between late December 2020 and March 2021. Our data revealed dramatic increases in the frequencies of both E484K and N501Y over time, underscoring the need for continuous epidemiological monitoring.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Genotype , Humans , Nasopharynx/virology , New Jersey/epidemiology , RNA, Viral/chemistry , RNA, Viral/genetics , Sensitivity and Specificity , Whole Genome Sequencing
19.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 37(3): E5-E9, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219254

ABSTRACT

The nursing professional development practitioner's call to action at a large, acute care academic facility during the novel coronavirus pandemic required adaptability and resiliency. When rapid, unprecedented challenges altered nursing professional development workflow, a department of 16 practitioners split into three teams. The teams achieved goals by meeting the demand for education and training of frontline staff during the surge in novel coronavirus patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurse Practitioners/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , New Jersey/epidemiology , Nursing Evaluation Research
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(8)2021 04 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215361

ABSTRACT

We read, with tremendous gratitude, Dr. Oleske and Dr. Bogden's comment in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health titled, "Blood Lead Concentrations in Newark Children" [...].


Subject(s)
Lead , Public Health , Child , Humans , New Jersey , Schools, Medical
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