Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 26
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0274357, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2029788

ABSTRACT

While the evidence is clear that 2020 voters shifted away from Election Day voting in favor of vote-by-mail and early voting, we know very little about how health risk versus party polarization around risk assessment influenced how and when to vote. We rely on individual-level observational data in the form of high-quality official voter administrative records from the State of New Mexico to ask how pandemic-related risk factors, especially voter age along with partisanship influenced voter decision-making. To identify causal factors, we use a difference-in-differences design and hazard model that compare 2020 general election and primary voter behavior to 2018 and 2016. We find that age and party were large factors in vote mode decisions in 2020, but not in 2016 or 2018. We consider the implications of our findings on how health risk and partisanship interact to influence decision-making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , New Mexico , Politics , Postal Service , Risk Factors
2.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0272089, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1974325

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To date, there are no studies of COVID-19 cases and deaths in the Navajo Nation, US. The primary objective of this manuscript is to understand whether counties with a higher proportion of Navajo (Diné) population also had higher cases and deaths of COVID-19 and whether these dropped with vaccination. METHOD: We undertook a cross-sectional analysis of county level data from March 16, 2020-May 11, 2021. Data were obtained from public repositories and the US Census for the Navajo Nation, including northeastern Arizona, southeastern Utah, and northwestern New Mexico. The primary outcome measure is the number of individuals with confirmed cases or deaths of COVID-19. A secondary outcome was COVID-19 vaccinations. RESULTS: The 11 counties in Navajo Nation have a wide variation in the percent Navajo population, the resources available (ICU beds and occupancy), and COVID-19 outcomes. Overall, there was a substantial increase in the number of cases from March 16 -July 16, 2020 (the height of the pandemic) with a doubling time of 10.12 days on Navajo Nation. The percent Navajo population was a strong predictor of COVID-19 cases and deaths per million population. COVID-19 vaccinations were inversely associated with COVID-19 cases and deaths in these counties. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic on the Navajo Nation is a story of resilience. Navajo Nation was one of the hardest hit areas of the United States, with peak cases and deaths due to COVID-19. With an aggressive vaccination effort, these cases and deaths were strikingly curtailed, showing the resilience of the Navajo (Diné) people.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Indians, North American , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , New Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , United States
4.
Sleep Med ; 99: 23-29, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1937202

ABSTRACT

Studies conducted during the COVID-19 Pandemic have reported increased rates of mental illnesses including depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) [1]. A common symptom of mental illness is change in Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, the phase of sleep associated with dreaming and nightmares. The COVID-19 pandemic offers a unique opportunity to evaluate the effects of systemic stress on nightmares. In this study, we investigate whether the COVID-19 pandemic affects nightmare frequency and content using a web-based survey within the state of New Mexico. The survey returned 197 responses showing an increase in the quantity of both bad dreams and nightmares. Furthermore, significant changes in nightmare themes were reported compared to relative rates prior to the pandemic (RR 1,42, p < 0.01; RR 5, p < 0.001). This novel data supports that increased stress from the COVID-19 pandemic has altered dream and nightmare content and frequency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dreams/physiology , Humans , New Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
6.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(3): 218-223, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1831524

ABSTRACT

With shortfalls of thousands of nurses throughout the United States, the need for nursing students to graduate and enter the workforce was critical even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Innovative nursing education models are needed to mitigate the staggering shortfall. For over 10 years, the New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium (NMNEC) has been recognized as a successful pathway for students to achieve nursing degrees. The NMNEC is a collaborative partnership between university and community college nursing programs who offer a common curriculum and share common academic policies. Students in the community college setting choose an associate degree program or a co-enrolled associate degree/bachelor of science in nursing program. The NMNEC currently includes 16 nursing program sites throughout the state. The development of the NMNEC including its infrastructure, leadership council, committees, and involvement of program directors has contributed to the strength. The outcomes of NMNEC's nursing graduates have been exceptional with strong progression and NCLEX pass percentages. Since NMNEC's inception, diversity and health equity have been strong components of the NMNEC model and curriculum. The NMNEC model provides equity to students at rural community colleges to achieve a bachelor of science degree while remaining in their home settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Health Equity , Students, Nursing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Curriculum , Health Promotion , Humans , New Mexico , Pandemics , United States
7.
Front Public Health ; 9: 744179, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775909

ABSTRACT

Outbreaks of wound botulism are rare, but clinicians and health departments should maintain suspicion for signs, symptoms, and risk factors of wound botulism among persons who inject drugs in order to initiate treatment quickly. This report describes an outbreak of three wound botulism cases among persons in two adjacent counties who injected drugs. Provisional information about these cases was previously published in the CDC National Botulism Surveillance Summary. All three cases in this outbreak were laboratory-confirmed, including one case with detection of botulinum toxin type A in a wound culture sample taken 43 days after last possible heroin exposure. Findings highlight the delay in diagnosis which led to prolonged hospitalization and the persistence of botulinum toxin in one patient.


Subject(s)
Botulism , Drug Users , Substance Abuse, Intravenous , Wound Infection , Botulism/diagnosis , Botulism/epidemiology , Botulism/etiology , Heroin/adverse effects , Humans , New Mexico , Substance Abuse, Intravenous/complications , Wound Infection/chemically induced , Wound Infection/epidemiology
8.
Am J Public Health ; 112(1): 116-123, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591384

ABSTRACT

Arguing for the importance of robust public participation and meaningful Tribal consultation to address the cumulative impacts of federal projects, we bridge interdisciplinary perspectives across law, public health, and Indigenous studies. We focus on openings in existing federal law to involve Tribes and publics more meaningfully in resource management planning, while recognizing the limits of this involvement when only the federal government dictates the terms of participation and analysis. We first discuss challenges and opportunities for addressing cumulative impacts and environmental justice through 2 US federal statutes: the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act. Focusing on a major federal planning process involving fracking in the Greater Chaco region of northwestern New Mexico, we examine how the Department of the Interior attempted Tribal consultation during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also highlight local efforts to monitor Diné health and well-being. For Diné people, human health is inseparable from the health of the land. But in applying the primary legal tools for analyzing the effects of extraction across the Greater Chaco region, federal agencies fragment categories of impact that Diné people view holistically. (Am J Public Health. 2022;112(1):116-123. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2021.306562).


Subject(s)
Community Participation , Decision Making , Environmental Policy/legislation & jurisprudence , Hydraulic Fracking/legislation & jurisprudence , Federal Government , Government Regulation , Humans , New Mexico/ethnology , Public Health
9.
J Prof Nurs ; 37(5): 928-934, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492501

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic created an upheaval for nursing faculty teaching students in both didactic and clinical settings. From the intense disruption, opportunities for creative endeavors emerged. Program directors from a consortium of 12 nursing schools met remotely for problem-solving and support. Rich text from minutes of nine program director meetings were analyzed. Aims of our project included identifying challenges that nurse educators encountered during the pandemic, demonstrating benefits of a university and community college partnership model, and informing nurse educators of innovative outcomes that originated from our project. Thematic analysis of meeting minutes revealed four categories: timing and urgency; collaboration, preparation, and teaching; altruism; and what we learned. Further themes were identified from each of the categories. Innovative outcomes were identified from the text including creation of website teaching resources and development of a computer based clinical checklist. Implications for future nursing education included that computer- based simulation will continue to be embedded in nursing curricula. Also, the need for nursing faculty to remain technologically savvy to deliver trailblazing online pedagogies will prominently continue. We conclude that the synergistic collaboration of nursing program directors can have momentous outcomes for support and success of nursing programs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , Computers , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , New Mexico , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Nutrients ; 13(7)2021 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302428

ABSTRACT

Harvest for Health is a home-based vegetable gardening intervention that pairs cancer survivors with Master Gardeners from the Cooperative Extension System. Initially developed and tested in Alabama, the program was adapted for the different climate, growing conditions, and population in New Mexico. This paper chronicles the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of "Southwest Harvest for Health". During the nine-month single-arm trial, 30 cancer survivor-Master Gardener dyads worked together to establish and maintain three seasonal gardens. Primary outcomes were accrual, retention, and satisfaction. Secondary outcomes were vegetable and fruit (V and F) intake, physical activity, and quality of life. Recruitment was diverse and robust, with 30 survivors of various cancers, aged 50-83, roughly one-third minority, and two-thirds females enrolled in just 60 days. Despite challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic, retention to the nine-month study was 100%, 93% reported "good-to-excellent" satisfaction, and 87% "would do it again." A median increase of 1.2 servings of V and F/day was documented. The adapted home-based vegetable gardening program was feasible, well-received, and resulted in increased V and F consumption among adult cancer survivors. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effectiveness of this program and to inform strategies to increase the successful implementation and further dissemination of this intervention.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors/education , Gardening/education , Horticultural Therapy/methods , Mentors , Vegetables , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Diet, Healthy/statistics & numerical data , Exercise , Female , Healthy Lifestyle , Horticultural Therapy/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New Mexico , Pilot Projects , Quality of Life
11.
Front Public Health ; 9: 689946, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1290084

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has required the professional healthcare workforce not only to adjust methods of delivering care safely but also act as a trusted sources of information during a time of uncertainty and rapid research and discovery. The Community Health Worker COVID-19 Impact Survey is a cross-sectional study developed to better understand the impact of COVID-19 on this sector of the healthcare workforce, including training needs of those working through the pandemic. The survey was distributed in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. This study focuses on Texas, and the data presented (n = 693) is a sub-set of qualitative data from the larger survey. Results of the content analysis described in this paper are intended to inform current COVID-19-related CHW training curriculum, in addition to future infectious disease prevention and preparedness response trainings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Arizona , Community Health Workers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , New Mexico , SARS-CoV-2 , Texas
12.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(6): e27888, 2021 06 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278298

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, US hospitals relied on static projections of future trends for long-term planning and were only beginning to consider forecasting methods for short-term planning of staffing and other resources. With the overwhelming burden imposed by COVID-19 on the health care system, an emergent need exists to accurately forecast hospitalization needs within an actionable timeframe. OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to leverage an existing COVID-19 case and death forecasting tool to generate the expected number of concurrent hospitalizations, occupied intensive care unit (ICU) beds, and in-use ventilators 1 day to 4 weeks in the future for New Mexico and each of its five health regions. METHODS: We developed a probabilistic model that took as input the number of new COVID-19 cases for New Mexico from Los Alamos National Laboratory's COVID-19 Forecasts Using Fast Evaluations and Estimation tool, and we used the model to estimate the number of new daily hospital admissions 4 weeks into the future based on current statewide hospitalization rates. The model estimated the number of new admissions that would require an ICU bed or use of a ventilator and then projected the individual lengths of hospital stays based on the resource need. By tracking the lengths of stay through time, we captured the projected simultaneous need for inpatient beds, ICU beds, and ventilators. We used a postprocessing method to adjust the forecasts based on the differences between prior forecasts and the subsequent observed data. Thus, we ensured that our forecasts could reflect a dynamically changing situation on the ground. RESULTS: Forecasts made between September 1 and December 9, 2020, showed variable accuracy across time, health care resource needs, and forecast horizon. Forecasts made in October, when new COVID-19 cases were steadily increasing, had an average accuracy error of 20.0%, while the error in forecasts made in September, a month with low COVID-19 activity, was 39.7%. Across health care use categories, state-level forecasts were more accurate than those at the regional level. Although the accuracy declined as the forecast was projected further into the future, the stated uncertainty of the prediction improved. Forecasts were within 5% of their stated uncertainty at the 50% and 90% prediction intervals at the 3- to 4-week forecast horizon for state-level inpatient and ICU needs. However, uncertainty intervals were too narrow for forecasts of state-level ventilator need and all regional health care resource needs. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time forecasting of the burden imposed by a spreading infectious disease is a crucial component of decision support during a public health emergency. Our proposed methodology demonstrated utility in providing near-term forecasts, particularly at the state level. This tool can aid other stakeholders as they face COVID-19 population impacts now and in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Delivery of Health Care , Health Planning/methods , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial , COVID-19/mortality , Equipment and Supplies , Forecasting , Hospitals , Humans , Length of Stay , Models, Statistical , New Mexico , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Surge Capacity
13.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 40(5): 802-811, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211720

ABSTRACT

The accessibility of pharmacies may be an overlooked contributor to persistent racial and ethnic disparities in the use of prescription medications and essential health care services within urban areas in the US. We examined the availability and geographic accessibility of pharmacies across neighborhoods based on their racial/ethnic composition in the thirty most populous US cities. In all cities examined, we found persistently fewer pharmacies located in Black and Hispanic/Latino neighborhoods than White or diverse neighborhoods throughout 2007-15. In 2015 there were disproportionately more pharmacy deserts in Black or Hispanic/Latino neighborhoods than in White or diverse neighborhoods, including those that are not federally designated Medically Underserved Areas. These disparities were most pronounced in Chicago, Illinois; Los Angeles, California; Baltimore, Maryland; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Dallas, Texas; Boston, Massachusetts; and Albuquerque, New Mexico. We also found that Black and Hispanic/Latino neighborhoods were more likely to experience pharmacy closures compared with other neighborhoods. Our findings suggest that efforts to increase access to medications and essential health care services, including in response to COVID-19, should consider policies that ensure equitable pharmacy accessibility across neighborhoods in US cities. Such efforts could include policies that encourage pharmacies to locate in pharmacy deserts, including increases to Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement rates for pharmacies most at risk for closure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmacies , African Americans , Aged , Baltimore , Boston , Chicago , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Illinois , Los Angeles , Massachusetts , Medicare , New Mexico , Philadelphia , SARS-CoV-2 , Texas , United States , Wisconsin
14.
NASN Sch Nurse ; 36(5): 276-283, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181004

ABSTRACT

When the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic led to school closures around the nation in March 2020, the role of the school nurse changed significantly, and it has continued to evolve as districts grapple with how to safely meet students' academic needs while also protecting the health of their communities. Nurses working for Santa Fe Public Schools in New Mexico have taken their new roles seriously and have been working closely with their district leaders, the New Mexico Department of Health, School Health Advocates, and the Public Education Department to facilitate evidence-based policies and procedures. Activities have included cohorting, contact tracing, resource development, education (of staff and families), planning and implementation of safety procedures, coordination of surveillance testing, and staff screening, along with finding new, COVID safe ways to provide standard school nursing services, including immunization administration, hearing and vision screening, teaching, and promoting wellness and mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Policy , Health Promotion/standards , Nursing Staff/psychology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , School Nursing/standards , Adolescent , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
15.
J Epidemiol Community Health ; 75(11): 1044-1049, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148170

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease pandemic has disproportionately affected poor and racial/ethnic minority individuals and communities, especially Indigenous Peoples. The object of this study is to understand the spatially varying associations between socioeconomic disadvantages and the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in New Mexico at the ZIP code level. METHODS: We constructed ZIP code-level data (n=372) using the 2014-2018 American Community Survey and COVID-19 data from the New Mexico Department of Health (as of 24 May 2020). The log-linear Poisson and geographically weighted Poisson regression are applied to model the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases (total population as the offset) in a ZIP code. RESULTS: The number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in a ZIP code is positively associated with socioeconomic disadvantages-specifically, the high levels of concentrated disadvantage and income inequality. It is also positively associated with the percentage of American Indian and Alaskan Native populations, net of other potential confounders at the ZIP code level. Importantly, these associations are spatially varying in that some ZIP codes suffer more from concentrated disadvantage than others. CONCLUSIONS: Additional attention for COVID-19 mitigation effort should focus on areas with higher levels of concentrated disadvantage, income inequality, and higher percentage of American Indian and Alaska Native populations as these areas have higher incidence of COVID-19. The findings also highlight the importance of plumbing in all households for access to clean and safe water, and the dissemination of educational materials aimed at COVID-19 prevention in non-English language including Indigenous languages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Income , Indigenous Peoples , Minority Groups , New Mexico/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors
17.
Drug Alcohol Depend ; 221: 108580, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1116565

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known regarding how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected patterns of drug use in the United States. Because drug seizures can serve as a proxy for drug availability, we examined shifts in drug seizures in the US during the pandemic. METHODS: We examined trends in seizures of marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, and fentanyl within five High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas-Washington/Baltimore, Chicago, Ohio, New Mexico, and North Florida. Trends were examined for number and total weight of seizures from March 2019 through September 2020 using Joinpoint regression. RESULTS: Significant decreases in seizures involving marijuana (ß = -0.03, P = 0.005) and methamphetamine (ß = -0.02, P = 0.026) were detected through April 2020, and then seizures of marijuana (ß = 0.10, P = 0.028) and methamphetamine (ß = 0.11, P = 0.010) significantly increased through September 2020. The number of seizures involving marijuana and methamphetamine peaked in August 2020, exceeding the highest pre-COVID-19 number of seizures. Fentanyl seizures increased overall (ß = 0.05, P < .001), but did not significantly drop during the start of COVID-19, and significant changes were not detected for cocaine or heroin. We also detected a significant increase in weight of marijuana seized from April through September 2020 (ß = 0.40, P = .001). The weight of marijuana seized in August 2020 exceeded the highest pre-COVID-19 weight. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic was associated with an immediate decrease in marijuana and methamphetamine seizures, and then increases throughout 2020 with some months exceeding the number (and weights) of seizures from the previous year. More research is warranted to determine the extent to which these seizures reflect changes in drug use.


Subject(s)
Drug Trafficking/trends , Illicit Drugs/supply & distribution , Law Enforcement , Baltimore , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cannabis , Chicago , Cocaine/supply & distribution , District of Columbia , Fentanyl/supply & distribution , Florida , Heroin/supply & distribution , Humans , Methamphetamine/supply & distribution , New Mexico , Ohio
18.
Am J Forensic Med Pathol ; 42(1): 1-8, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066484

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has spread worldwide, infiltrating, infecting, and devastating communities in all locations of varying demographics. An overwhelming majority of published literature on the pathologic findings associated with COVID-19 is either from living clinical cohorts or from autopsy findings of those who died in a medical care setting, which can confound pure disease pathology. A relatively low initial infection rate paired with a high biosafety level enabled the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator to conduct full autopsy examinations on suspected COVID-19-related deaths. Full autopsy examination on the first 20 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2-positive decedents revealed that some extent of diffuse alveolar damage in every death due to COVID-19 played some role. The average decedent was middle-aged, male, American Indian, and overweight with comorbidities that included diabetes, ethanolism, and atherosclerotic and/or hypertensive cardiovascular disease. Macroscopic thrombotic events were seen in 35% of cases consisting of pulmonary thromboemboli and coronary artery thrombi. In 2 cases, severe bacterial coinfections were seen in the lungs. Those determined to die with but not of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection had unremarkable lung findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Lung/pathology , Adult , Age Distribution , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Autopsy , Body Mass Index , Brain Edema/pathology , Cardiomegaly/pathology , Comorbidity , Coronary Thrombosis/pathology , Databases, Factual , Fatty Liver/pathology , Female , Forensic Pathology , Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental/pathology , Hepatomegaly/pathology , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Nephrosclerosis/pathology , New Mexico/epidemiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pleural Effusion/diagnostic imaging , Pleural Effusion/pathology , Pulmonary Edema/diagnostic imaging , Pulmonary Edema/pathology , Sex Distribution , Streptococcus pneumoniae/isolation & purification , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Vitreous Body/chemistry , Whole Body Imaging
19.
Public Health Rep ; 136(1): 39-46, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-961218

ABSTRACT

Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) at the University of New Mexico is a telementoring program that uses videoconferencing technology to connect health care providers in underserved communities with subject matter experts. In March 2020, Project ECHO created 10 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) telementoring programs to meet the public health needs of clinicians and teachers living in underserved rural and urban regions of New Mexico. The newly created COVID-19 programs include 7 weekly sessions (Community Health Worker [in English and Spanish], Critical Care, Education, First-Responder Resiliency, Infectious Disease Office Hours, and Multi-specialty) and 3 one-day special sessions. We calculated the total number of attendees, along with the range and standard deviation, per session by program. Certain programs (Critical Care, Infectious Disease Office Hours, Multi-specialty) recorded the profession of attendees when available. The Project ECHO research team collected COVID-19 infection data by county from March 11 through May 31, 2020. During that same period, 9765 health care and general education professionals participated in the COVID-19 programs, and participants from 31 of 35 (89%) counties in New Mexico attended the sessions. Our initial evaluation of these programs demonstrates that an interprofessional clinician group and teachers used the Project ECHO network to build a community of practice and social network while meeting their educational and professional needs. Because of Project ECHO's large reach, the results of the New Mexico COVID-19 response suggest that the rapid use of ECHO telementoring could be used for other urgent national public health problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Community Health Services/organization & administration , Health Personnel/education , Inservice Training/organization & administration , Mentoring/organization & administration , Rural Population , Community Health Services/standards , Community Health Workers/education , Evidence-Based Practice , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Medically Underserved Area , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , New Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Urban Population , Videoconferencing
20.
J Infect Dis ; 222(10): 1620-1628, 2020 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-863292

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Convalescent plasma (CP) is a potentially important therapy for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, knowledge regarding neutralizing antibody (NAb) titers in donor plasma and their impact in patients with acute COVID-19 remains largely undetermined. We measured NAb titers in CP and in patients with acute COVID-19 before and after transfusion through the traditional Food and Drug Administration investigational new drug pathway. METHODS: We performed a single-arm interventional trial measuring NAb and total antibody titers before and after CP transfusion over a 14-day period in hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. RESULTS: NAb titers in the donor CP units were low (<1:40 to 1:160) and had no effect on recipient neutralizing activity 1 day after transfusion. NAb titers were detected in 6 of 12 patients on enrollment and in 11 of 12 at ≥2 time points. Average titers peaked on day 7 and declined toward day 14 (P = .004). Nab titers and immunoglobulin G levels were correlated in donor plasma units (ρ = 0.938; P < .001) and in the cumulative patient measures (ρ = 0.781; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: CP infusion did not alter recipient NAb titers. Prescreening of CP may be necessary for selecting donors with high titers of neutralizing activity for infusion into patients with COVID-19. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NCT04434131.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Blood Donors , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , New Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA, Viral/genetics , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL