Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 26
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(12): e2138464, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1567894

ABSTRACT

Importance: Persons experiencing homelessness (PEH) are at higher risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection and severe illness due to COVID-19 because of a limited ability to physically distance and a higher burden of underlying health conditions. Objective: To describe and assess a hotel-based protective housing intervention to reduce incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection among PEH in Chicago, Illinois, with increased risk of severe illness due to COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study analyzed PEH who were provided protective housing in individual hotel rooms in downtown Chicago during the COVID-19 pandemic from April 2 through September 3, 2020. Participants were PEH at increased risk for severe COVID-19, defined as (1) aged at least 60 years regardless of health conditions, (2) aged at least 55 years with any underlying health condition posing increased risk, or (3) aged less than 55 years with any underlying health condition posing substantially increased risk (eg, HIV/AIDS). Exposures: Participants were housed in individual hotel rooms to reduce the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection; on-site health care workers provided daily symptom monitoring, regular SARS-CoV-2 testing, and care for chronic health conditions. Additional on-site services included treatment of mental health and substance use disorders and social services. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome measured was SARS-CoV-2 incidence, with SARS-Cov2 infection defined as a positive upper respiratory specimen using any polymerase chain reaction diagnostic assay authorized for emergency use by the Food and Drug Administration. Secondary outcomes were blood pressure control, glycemic control as measured by hemoglobin A1c, and housing placements at departure. Results: Of 259 participants from 16 homeless shelters in Chicago, 104 (40.2%) were aged at least 65 years, 190 (73.4%) were male, 185 (71.4%) were non-Hispanic Black, and 49 (18.9%) were non-Hispanic White. There was an observed reduction in SARS-CoV-2 incidence during the study period among the protective housing cohort (54.7 per 1000 people [95% CI, 22.4-87.1 per 1000 people]) compared with citywide rates for PEH residing in shelters (137.1 per 1000 people [95% CI, 125.1-149.1 per 1000 people]; P = .001). There was also an adjusted change in systolic blood pressure at a rate of -5.7 mm Hg (95% CI, -9.3 to -2.1 mm Hg) and hemoglobin A1c at a rate of -1.4% (95% CI, -2.4% to -0.4%) compared with baseline. More than half of participants (51% [n = 132]) departed from the intervention to housing of some kind (eg, supportive housing). Conclusions and Relevance: This cohort study found that protective housing was associated with a reduction in SARS-CoV-2 infection among high-risk PEH during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Chicago. These findings suggest that with appropriate wraparound supports (ie, multisector services to address complex needs), such housing interventions may reduce the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection, improve noncommunicable disease control, and provide a pathway to permanent housing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Homeless Persons , Housing , Noncommunicable Diseases , Program Evaluation , Adult , Aged , Blood Pressure , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing , Chicago , Chronic Disease , Female , Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism , Health Status Disparities , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Problems
2.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e051107, 2021 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403077

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Multimorbidity refers to the presence of two or more chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in a given individual. It is associated with premature mortality, lower quality of life (QoL) and greater use of healthcare resources. The burden of multimorbidity could be huge in the low and middle-income countries (LMICs), including Ethiopia. However, there is limited evidence on the magnitude of multimorbidity, associated risk factors and its effect on QoL and functionality. In addition, the evidence base on the way health systems are organised to manage patients with multimorbidity is sparse. The knowledge gleaned from this study could have a timely and significant impact on the prevention, management and survival of patients with NCD multimorbidity in Ethiopia and in LMICs at large. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study has three phases: (1) a cross-sectional quantitative study to determine the magnitude of NCD multimorbidity and its effect on QoL and functionality, (2) a qualitative study to explore organisation of care for patients with multimorbidity, and (3) a longitudinal quantitative study to investigate disease progression and patient outcomes over time. A total of 1440 patients (≥40 years) on chronic care follow-up will be enrolled from different facilities for the quantitative studies. The quantitative data will be collected from multiple sources using the KoBo Toolbox software and analysed by STATA V.16. Multiple case study designs will be employed to collect the qualitative data. The qualitative data will be coded and analysed by Open Code software thematically. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical clearance has been obtained from the College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University (protocol number 003/2021). Subjects who provide written consent will be recruited in the study. Confidentiality of data will be strictly maintained. Findings will be disseminated through publications in peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations.


Subject(s)
Noncommunicable Diseases , Ambulatory Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Humans , Multimorbidity , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Outpatients , Quality of Life
3.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 143, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374656

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disrupted health systems worldwide, gravely threatening continuity of care for non-communicable diseases (NCDs), particularly in low-resource settings. We describe our efforts to maintain the continuity of care for patients with NCDs in rural western Kenya during the COVID-19 pandemic, using a five-component approach: 1) Protect: protect staff and patients; 2) Preserve: ensure medication availability and clinical services; 3) Promote: conduct health education and screenings for NCDs and COVID-19; 4) Process: collect process indicators and implement iterative quality improvement; and 5) Plan: plan for the future and ensure financial risk protection in the face of a potentially overwhelming health and economic catastrophe. As the pandemic continues to evolve, we must continue to pursue new avenues for improvement and expansion. We anticipate continuing to learn from the evolving local context and our global partners as we proceed with our efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Humans , Kenya , Rural Health Services/organization & administration
4.
Nutrients ; 13(8)2021 Aug 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360798

ABSTRACT

Throughout the 20th and 21st centuries, the incidence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), also known as chronic diseases, has been increasing worldwide. Changes in dietary and physical activity patterns, along with genetic conditions, are the main factors that modulate the metabolism of individuals, leading to the development of NCDs. Obesity, diabetes, metabolic associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD), and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are classified in this group of chronic diseases. Therefore, understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of these diseases leads us to develop more accurate and effective treatments to reduce or mitigate their prevalence in the population. Given the global relevance of NCDs and ongoing research progress, this article reviews the current understanding about NCDs and their related risk factors, with a focus on obesity, diabetes, MAFLD, and CVDs, summarizing the knowledge about their pathophysiology and highlighting the currently available and emerging therapeutic strategies, especially pharmacological interventions. All of these diseases play an important role in the contamination by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, as well as in the progression and severity of the symptoms of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Therefore, we briefly explore the relationship between NCDs and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Metabolic Diseases/therapy , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/physiopathology , Chronic Disease , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , Metabolic Diseases/physiopathology , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
5.
Glob Heart ; 16(1): 44, 2021 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1285508

ABSTRACT

During the COVI9-19 pandemic, Pakkred hospital in Thailand implemented innovative practices to ensure the continuation of essential medical services for non-communicable disease patients. These practices included decentralized care, telemedicine, home blood pressure monitoring, community delivery of medicines, and facility infrastructure changes. Despite the decrease in hospital visits by hypertension patients during the pandemic, our results suggest that this package of interventions may have contributed to sustained hypertension and diabetes control rates in Pakkred district.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Hypertension/therapy , Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory/methods , Community Health Workers , Continuity of Patient Care , Health Facilities , Health Facility Environment , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Organizational Innovation , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Thailand , Ventilation
7.
Biochimie ; 187: 94-109, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252495

ABSTRACT

Despite the development of a number of vaccines for COVID-19, there remains a need for prevention and treatment of the virus SARS-CoV-2 and the ensuing disease COVID-19. This report discusses the key elements of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 that can be readily treated: viral entry, the immune system and inflammation, and the cytokine storm. It is shown that the essential nutrients zinc, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), vitamin D and magnesium provide the ideal combination for prevention and treatment of COVID-19: prevention of SARS-CoV-2 entry to host cells, prevention of proliferation of SARS-CoV-2, inhibition of excessive inflammation, improved control of the regulation of the immune system, inhibition of the cytokine storm, and reduction in the effects of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and associated non-communicable diseases. It is emphasized that the non-communicable diseases associated with COVID-19 are inherently more prevalent in the elderly than the young, and that the maintenance of sufficiency of zinc, ω-3 PUFAs, vitamin D and magnesium is essential for the elderly to prevent the occurrence of non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, lung diseases and cancer. Annual checking of levels of these essential nutrients is recommended for those over 65 years of age, together with appropriate adjustments in their intake, with these services and supplies being at government cost. The cost:benefit ratio would be huge as the cost of the nutrients and the testing of their levels would be very small compared with the cost savings of specialists and hospitalization.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Fatty Acids, Omega-3/therapeutic use , Magnesium/therapeutic use , Noncommunicable Diseases/prevention & control , Vitamin D/therapeutic use , Zinc/therapeutic use , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/prevention & control , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Inflammation/therapy , Lung Diseases/prevention & control , Lung Diseases/therapy , Neoplasms/prevention & control , Neoplasms/therapy , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Nutritional Status , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamins/therapeutic use
10.
Ciênc. Saúde Colet ; 26(3): 987-1000, mar. 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1138612

ABSTRACT

Abstract The objective was to identify the impact of social distance in the management of noncommunicable diseases (NCD) in the adult population from the state of Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. This is an ambispective, population-based cohort study. Descriptive analysis and Poisson regression models were used and the results were reported as prevalence ratio and 95% confidence intervals. From a total of 1,288 participants, 43.1% needed medical care and 28.5% reported impaired management of NCDs during social distance. Female sex, age between 18 and 30 years old, living in the Serra region (central region of the state), people with depression and multimorbidity were more likely to have impaired management of NCDs. Being physically active reduced the probability of having impaired management of NCD by 15%. Reduced monthly income was associated with the difficulty in accessing prescription medicine and avoidance of seeking in-person medical assistance. Depression was associated with difficulties in accessing medications, while avoidance of seeking in-person medical assistance was more likely for people with multimorbidity, arthritis/arthrosis/fibromyalgia, heart disease, and high cholesterol.


Resumo O objetivo foi identificar o impacto do distanciamento social no manejo das doenças crônicas não transmissíveis (DCNT) na população adulta do estado do Rio Grande do Sul, sul do Brasil. Este é um estudo de coorte ambispectivo de base populacional. Foi utilizada análise descritiva e modelos de regressão de Poisson, os resultados são apresentados em razão de prevalência e intervalos de confiança de 95%. De um total de 1.288 participantes, 43,1% necessitaram de cuidados médicos e 28,5% relataram manejo prejudicado de DCNT durante o distanciamento social. Sexo feminino, idade entre 18 e 30 anos, residente na região da Serra (região central do estado), pessoas com depressão e multimorbidade apresentaram maior chance de manejo prejudicado das DCNT. Ser fisicamente ativo reduziu a probabilidade de ter gerenciamento prejudicado de DCNT em 15%. A redução da renda mensal esteve associada à dificuldade de acesso a medicamentos prescritos e a deixar de buscar atendimento médico presencial. A depressão foi associada a dificuldades de acesso a medicamentos, enquanto deixar de buscar assistência médica pessoalmente foi mais provável para pessoas com multimorbidade, artrite/artrose/fibromialgia, doenças cardíacas e colesterol alto.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Young Adult , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Socioeconomic Factors , Brazil/epidemiology , Exercise , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Poisson Distribution , Sex Factors , Regression Analysis , Cohort Studies , Age Factors , Depression/psychology , Multimorbidity , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Income , Middle Aged
12.
Age Ageing ; 50(2): 317-325, 2021 02 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1114821

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is little evidence about the utilisation of healthcare services and disease recognition in the older population, which was urged to self-isolate during the COVID-19 lockdown. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to describe the utilisation of physician consultations, specialist referrals, hospital admissions and the recognition of incident diseases in Germany for this age group during the COVID-19 lockdown. DESIGN: Cross-sectional observational study. SETTING: 1,095 general practitioners (GPs) and 960 specialist practices in Germany. SUBJECTS: 2.45 million older patients aged 65 or older. METHODS: The number of documented physician consultations, specialist referrals, hospital admissions and incident diagnoses during the imposed lockdown in 2020 was descriptively analysed and compared to 2019. RESULTS: Physician consultations decrease slightly in February (-2%), increase before the imposed lockdown in March (+9%) and decline in April (-18%) and May (-14%) 2020 compared to the same periods in 2019. Volumes of hospital admissions decrease earlier and more intensely than physician consultations (-39 versus -6%, respectively). Overall, 15, 16 and 18% fewer incident diagnoses were documented by GPs, neurologists and diabetologists, respectively, in 2020. Diabetes, dementia, depression, cancer and stroke were diagnosed less frequently during the lockdown (-17 to -26%), meaning that the decrease in the recognition of diseases was greater than the decrease in physician consultations. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that organisational changes were adopted quickly by practice management but also raise concerns about the maintenance of routine care. Prospective studies should evaluate the long-term effects of lockdowns on patient-related outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delayed Diagnosis , Delivery of Health Care , Noncommunicable Diseases , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/methods , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delayed Diagnosis/adverse effects , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Organizational Innovation , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Intern Med ; 289(4): 450-462, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102058

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an ongoing global pandemic affecting all levels of health systems. This includes the care of patients with noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) who bear a disproportionate burden of both COVID-19 itself and the public health measures enacted to combat it. In this review, we summarize major COVID-19-related considerations for NCD patients and their care providers, focusing on cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, haematologic, oncologic, traumatic, obstetric/gynaecologic, operative, psychiatric, rheumatologic/immunologic, neurologic, gastrointestinal, ophthalmologic and endocrine disorders. Additionally, we offer a general framework for categorizing the pandemic's disruptions by disease-specific factors, direct health system factors and indirect health system factors. We also provide references to major NCD medical specialty professional society statements and guidelines on COVID-19. COVID-19 and its control policies have already resulted in major disruptions to the screening, treatment and surveillance of NCD patients. In addition, it differentially impacts those with pre-existing NCDs and may lead to de novo NCD sequelae. Likely, there will be long-term effects from this pandemic that will continue to affect practitioners and patients in this field for years to come.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Noncommunicable Diseases , Patient Care Management , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Humans , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Organizational Innovation , Patient Care Management/organization & administration , Patient Care Management/trends , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Glob Health Promot ; 28(2): 83-86, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083250

ABSTRACT

There has been a rise in non-communicable diseases (NCD) in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), driven by westernization, urbanization and unhealthy lifestyles. The prevalence of NCDs and their risk factors vary considerably in SSA between countries and the various sub-populations. A study documented the prevalence of stroke ranging from 0.07 to 0.3%, diabetes mellitus from 0 to 16%, hypertension from 6 to 48%, obesity from 0.4 to 43%, and current smoking from 0.4 to 71%. The numbers of these NCD cases are predicted to rise over the next decade. However, in the context of a global pandemic such as COVID-19, with the rising cases, lockdowns and deaths recorded worldwide, many people living with NCDs may find accessing care more difficult. The majority of the available resources on the subcontinent have been diverted to focus on the ongoing pandemic. This has caused interruptions in care, complication management, drug pick-up alongside the almost neglected silent NCD epidemic, with major consequences for the health system post the COVID-19 era. We explore the issues surrounding the continuity of care and offer some solutions for Sub-Saharan Africa.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , Noncommunicable Diseases , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Humans , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy
15.
Postgrad Med ; 132(sup4): 18-27, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1072240

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic as a result of the SARS-CoV2 virus has seen over 16 m people infected and over 650,000 deaths, with men at double the risk of both developing the severe form of the disease and mortality. There are both biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) factors, compounded by socio-economic factors and ethnicity, that impact on the aftermath of what has occurred over the short time that this novel coronavirus has been circulating the world. The potential life-long morbidity as a result of the infection and as a consequence of highly invasive critical care treatment needs to be factored into the rehabilitation of survivors. There are also many men whose lives will have been severely affected both physically and emotionally by the pandemic without ever contracting the disease, with the widespread disruption to normal existence and its impact on their social world and the economy. The implications of the closure of many healthcare services over the initial lockdown will also have both a shorter- and longer-term impact on other diseases due to missed early diagnosis and disrupted treatment regimes. Getting effective public health messages out to the population is critical and this current pandemic is demonstrating that there needs to be a more focused view on men's health behavior. Without effective public support for preventative action, the more likely the disease will continue its path unabated. This review explores the wider ramifications of the disease both for those men who have survived the disease and those that have been affected by the wider social effects of the pandemic. The pandemic should be a wake-up call for all involved in the planning and delivery of health and social care for the greater attention to the central role of sex and gender.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Noncommunicable Diseases , Public Health , Sex Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/rehabilitation , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Male , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Psychology , Public Health/methods , Public Health/trends , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors
16.
Curr Med Res Opin ; 37(3): 385-391, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066084

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) remains pandemic with considerable morbidity and mortality around the world. The aim of this study was to identify the predictors for clinical deterioration in patients with COVID-19 who did not show clinical deterioration upon hospital admission. METHODS: Two hundred fifty-seven patients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to Guangzhou Eighth People's Hospital between 23 January and 21 March 2020 were retrospectively enrolled. Demographic data, symptoms, laboratory values, comorbidities and treatments were all collected. The study endpoint was clinical deterioration within 20 days from hospital admission. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression methods were used to explore the risk factors associated with clinical deterioration. RESULTS: A total of 49 (19%) patients showed clinical deterioration after admission. Compared with patients that did not experience clinical deterioration, clinically deteriorated patients had more dyspnea, cough and myalgia (65.3% versus 29.3%) symptoms and more had comorbidities (89.8% versus 36.1%). Clinical and laboratory characteristics at admission that were associated with clinical deterioration included senior age, diabetes, hypertension, myalgia, higher temperature, systolic blood pressure, C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin, activated partial thromboplastin time, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, direct bilirubin, plasma creatinine, lymphocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, decreased albumin and bicarbonate concentration. Medical history of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, calcium channel blockers and metformin were also risk factors. CONCLUSION: The four best predictors for clinical deterioration were CRP, procalcitonin, age and albumin. A "best" multivariable prediction model, resulting from using a variable selection procedure, included senior age, presentation with myalgia, and higher level of CRP and serum creatinine (bias-corrected c-statistic = 0.909). Sensitivity and specificity corresponding to a cut point of CRP ≥18.45 mg/L for predicting clinical deterioration were 85% and 74%, respectively.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Clinical Deterioration , Noncommunicable Diseases , Procalcitonin/analysis , Serum Albumin/analysis , Age Factors , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sensitivity and Specificity
17.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(1): e25652, 2021 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A reduction in the number of face-to-face medical examinations conducted for patients with noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic has led to health care professionals quickly adopting different strategies to communicate with and monitor their patients. Such strategies include the increased use of digital health tools. However, patient preferences, privacy concerns, a lack of regulations, overregulation, and insufficient evidence on the efficacy of digital health tools may have hampered the potential positive benefits of using such tools to manage NCDs. OBJECTIVE: This viewpoint aims to discuss the views of an advisory board of patient and caregiver association members. Specifically, we aim to present this advisory board's view on the role of digital health tools in managing patients with NCDs during and after the COVID-19 pandemic, and to identify future directions based on patients' perspectives. METHODS: As an initiative under the NCD Partnership (PARTners in Ncds Engage foR building Strategies to improve Healthy ageing In Patients) model of Upjohn, a web-based advisory board of patient and caregiver advocates was held on July 28, 2020, to bring together key stakeholders from public and private sectors. RESULTS: The following key themes emerged: (1) technology developers should understand that the goals of patients may differ from those of health care professionals and other stakeholders; (2) patients, health care professionals, caregivers, and other end users need to be involved in the development of digital health tools at the earliest phase possible, to guarantee usability, efficacy, and adoption; (3) digital health tools must be better tailored to people with complex conditions, such as multimorbidity, older age, and cognitive or sensory impairment; and (4) some patients do not want or are unable to use digital health care tools, so adequate alternatives should always be available. CONCLUSIONS: There was consensus that public-private partnership models, such as the Upjohn NCD Partnership, can be effective models that foster innovation by integrating multiple perspectives (eg, patients' perspectives) into the design, development, and implementation of digital and nondigital health tools, with the main overall objective of improving the life of patients with NCDs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Disease Management , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Age Factors , Aged , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Privacy , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(1): 343-350, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039333

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Greater COVID-19 related mortality has been reported among persons with various non-communicable diseases (NCDs). We performed an ecological study to determine the association of state-level cases and deaths with NCD risk factors and healthcare and social indices. METHODS: We obtained cumulative national and state-level data on COVID-19 cases and deaths from publicly available database www.covid19india.org from February to end November 2020. To identify association with major NCD risk factors, NCDs, healthcare related and social variables we obtained data from public sources. Association was determined using univariate and multivariate statistics. RESULTS: More than 9.5 million COVID-19 cases and 135,000 deaths have been reported in India towards end of November 2020. There is significant positive correlation (Pearson r) of state-level COVID-19 cases and deaths per million, respectively, with NCD risk factors- obesity (0.64, 0.52), hypertension (0.28, 0.16), diabetes (0.66, 0.46), NCD epidemiological transition index (0.58, 0.54) and ischemic heart disease mortality (0.22, 0.33). Correlation is also observed with indices of healthcare access and quality (0.71, 0.61), urbanization (0.75, 0.73) and human (0.61, 0.56) and sociodemographic (0.70, 0.69) development. Multivariate adjusted analyses shows strong correlation of COVID-19 burden and deaths with NCD risk factors (r2 = 0.51, 0.43), NCDs (r2 = 0.32, 0.16) and healthcare (r2 = 0.52, 0.38). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 disease burden and mortality in India is ecologically associated with greater state-level burden of NCDs and risk factors, especially obesity and diabetes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cost of Illness , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , India/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Obesity/diagnosis , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/therapy , Risk Factors
19.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(1): e25652, 2021 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1034869

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A reduction in the number of face-to-face medical examinations conducted for patients with noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic has led to health care professionals quickly adopting different strategies to communicate with and monitor their patients. Such strategies include the increased use of digital health tools. However, patient preferences, privacy concerns, a lack of regulations, overregulation, and insufficient evidence on the efficacy of digital health tools may have hampered the potential positive benefits of using such tools to manage NCDs. OBJECTIVE: This viewpoint aims to discuss the views of an advisory board of patient and caregiver association members. Specifically, we aim to present this advisory board's view on the role of digital health tools in managing patients with NCDs during and after the COVID-19 pandemic, and to identify future directions based on patients' perspectives. METHODS: As an initiative under the NCD Partnership (PARTners in Ncds Engage foR building Strategies to improve Healthy ageing In Patients) model of Upjohn, a web-based advisory board of patient and caregiver advocates was held on July 28, 2020, to bring together key stakeholders from public and private sectors. RESULTS: The following key themes emerged: (1) technology developers should understand that the goals of patients may differ from those of health care professionals and other stakeholders; (2) patients, health care professionals, caregivers, and other end users need to be involved in the development of digital health tools at the earliest phase possible, to guarantee usability, efficacy, and adoption; (3) digital health tools must be better tailored to people with complex conditions, such as multimorbidity, older age, and cognitive or sensory impairment; and (4) some patients do not want or are unable to use digital health care tools, so adequate alternatives should always be available. CONCLUSIONS: There was consensus that public-private partnership models, such as the Upjohn NCD Partnership, can be effective models that foster innovation by integrating multiple perspectives (eg, patients' perspectives) into the design, development, and implementation of digital and nondigital health tools, with the main overall objective of improving the life of patients with NCDs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Disease Management , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Age Factors , Aged , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Privacy , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...